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Kennedy Assassination

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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
Seeing footage of CBS newsman Walter Cronkite, his voice catching as he announces Preisdent John F. Kennedy's death, sends a chill through Diane Scharper, a poet and author who teaches writing at Towson University. "Even now, it brings tears to your eyes," said Scharper, who was a student at the College of Notre Dame when Kennedy was shot in November 1963. She and her advisor, Sister Kathleen Marie Engers, had been in a workroom just off a small theater on campus when they learned the news.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Georges R. Garinther, a retired Army civilian engineer who studied ordnance noise and once examined the acoustics of the John F. Kennedy assassination, died March 9 of complications from heart disease and Alzheimer's disease at his daughter's Havre de Grace home. He was 79. An Army publication described Mr. Garinther as "an international authority on the effects of impulse noise on the hearing of soldiers and on the measurement and analysis of impulse and steady-state noise" when he retired in 1996 from the Aberdeen Proving Ground's Human Engineering Lab. "His job was to save the hearing of soldiers and allow them to communicate better," said a son, Geoff Garinther, a Lutherville resident.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In many a history of the Kennedy assassination during the past 50 years, mention has been made of the Boston Symphony Orchestra concert that was going on that awful Friday afternoon, and how the ensemble changed the program to play the Funeral March from Beethoven's "Eroica. " I have long wondered what that concert must have been like, how the audience responded when conductor Erich Leinsdorf broke the news, how the performance sounded. Audio from that event surfaced almost a year ago on -- where else?
NEWS
November 24, 2013
The recent articles about America of Nov. 22, 1963 and the assassination of President John F. Kennedy have been wonderful; it was such an important time in American history. However, one very universal memory has been left out from the baby boomers just getting out of school on the East Coast on that day. We typically found out about the shooting as we were leaving school, at the locker room or school bus, and we all remember going home to a mother in tears in front of an old black and white television.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 20, 2013
The assassination of President John F. Kennedy came up one day several years ago, in a jarring way, and at a moment when I least expected it. I was fishing with Bill Burton and Calvert Bregel, two of my older, wiser friends. We were knee-deep in the Gunpowder River, in northern Baltimore County. "You know what?" Calvert said, looking downstream and squinting, as if to dislodge a memory. "I haven't been here in a long time, but I think there used to be a nice covered bridge over this river.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | February 13, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Although Oliver Stone's soon-to-shoot drama on the John F. Kennedy assassination, based on Jim Garrison's conspiracy theories, is grabbing all the attention, five other projects on the same subject are on the way -- 28 years after the event.Stone's yet-untitled film begins shooting in April on locations in Dallas and New Orleans. Scripted by Stone, it is based on the books of former New Orleans district attorney Garrison. Now a Louisiana circuit judge, Garrison has long maintained that Kennedy was the victim of a CIA conspiracy, with Lee Harvey Oswald set up to take the fall.
FEATURES
By David Williams and David Williams,Contributing Writer | November 15, 1993
Catonsville resident Gus Russo's interest in the assassination of John F. Kennedy has led him to prominence this month. He'll be interviewed by Dan Rather and his work featured on PBS's "Frontline."With the 30th anniversary of Kennedy's assassination, Mr. Russo has found himself in demand by the media as they scramble to untangle the knot of conflicting theories surrounding the country's most classic mystery. Mr. Russo's resistance to entrenching himself behind any single theory or conclusion has earned him a growing reputation for level-headed insight on the most controversial details of the case -- Dan Rather's producer called him "the voice of reason among thousands" of arguing experts.
NEWS
By Harrison E. Livingstone | March 23, 1992
SHOW BUSINESS has discovered the John F. Kennedy assassination.Everybody is getting into the act. We have all sorts of phony theories that help hucksters sell themselves as expert witnesses, write and promote books and films and generally muck up the story of an American tragedy.To those of us who have spent years in serious study of the assassination, the hype is extremely frustrating. We know what's wheat and what's chaff, what's based on solid evidence and what's created from thin air to promote someone's half-cocked theory.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2007
The biggest mistake, by far, that well-intentioned laypeople make in concluding there was a conspiracy in the Kennedy assassination, and the biggest argument, by far, that conspiracy theorists use in their books to support their position of a conspiracy, is to maintain that such and such a group `had a motive' to kill Kennedy and, therefore, must have done it." - VINCENT BUGLIOSI, writing in his new book "Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy"
NEWS
June 8, 2008
Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years By David Talbot Free Press / 479 pages / $15 Published in paperback to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the Robert F. Kennedy assassination, the book focuses on the relationship between Bobby and John F. Kennedy. The book is based on interviews with more than 150 people as well as government documents, and tells, among other things, of JFK's efforts to prevent war with the Soviet Union and Bobby Kennedy's secret quest to solve his brother's murder.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
In many a history of the Kennedy assassination during the past 50 years, mention has been made of the Boston Symphony Orchestra concert that was going on that awful Friday afternoon, and how the ensemble changed the program to play the Funeral March from Beethoven's "Eroica. " I have long wondered what that concert must have been like, how the audience responded when conductor Erich Leinsdorf broke the news, how the performance sounded. Audio from that event surfaced almost a year ago on -- where else?
NEWS
November 22, 2013
Marylanders had a special affinity for John F. Kennedy, who we memorialize this week on the 50th anniversary of his assassination on Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas. That affinity is more than the fact that Kennedy was a Democrat in a state weighted toward Democrats. Maryland's heritage of progressive public policy (it was the first state to declare religious tolerance) shares much with the Kennedy vision, known generally under the rubric the New Frontier. Maryland has produced its own visionaries, such as Charles Carroll of Carrollton, signer of the Declaration of Independence; Francis Scott Key, composer of our national anthem; and Frederick Douglass, the slave who became a renowned abolitionist.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 20, 2013
The assassination of President John F. Kennedy came up one day several years ago, in a jarring way, and at a moment when I least expected it. I was fishing with Bill Burton and Calvert Bregel, two of my older, wiser friends. We were knee-deep in the Gunpowder River, in northern Baltimore County. "You know what?" Calvert said, looking downstream and squinting, as if to dislodge a memory. "I haven't been here in a long time, but I think there used to be a nice covered bridge over this river.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2013
Seeing footage of CBS newsman Walter Cronkite, his voice catching as he announces Preisdent John F. Kennedy's death, sends a chill through Diane Scharper, a poet and author who teaches writing at Towson University. "Even now, it brings tears to your eyes," said Scharper, who was a student at the College of Notre Dame when Kennedy was shot in November 1963. She and her advisor, Sister Kathleen Marie Engers, had been in a workroom just off a small theater on campus when they learned the news.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
Kenneth O'Donnell, aide to President John F. Kennedy, stepped into a small cubicle at Parkland Hospital, where Vice President Lyndon Baines Johnson nervously waited with his wife and several aides to learn the condition of the president. Kennedy had been shot as his motorcade made its way through downtown Dallas on a sun-splashed November autumn afternoon. "He's gone," O'Donnell said to Johnson, who through an assassin's hand had become the 36th president of the United States. It was 1:30 p.m. Central Standard Time, Nov. 22, 1963.
NEWS
June 8, 2008
Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years By David Talbot Free Press / 479 pages / $15 Published in paperback to coincide with the 40th anniversary of the Robert F. Kennedy assassination, the book focuses on the relationship between Bobby and John F. Kennedy. The book is based on interviews with more than 150 people as well as government documents, and tells, among other things, of JFK's efforts to prevent war with the Soviet Union and Bobby Kennedy's secret quest to solve his brother's murder.
NEWS
By David Hanners and David Hanners,Dallas Morning News | September 19, 1993
DALLAS -- The public will get its first taste of Lyndon B. Johnson's often-fiery telephone conversations in the days after the Kennedy assassination when the long-secret tapes are released this week.The Lyndon B. Johnson Library said Friday that transcripts of about 275 phone calls from November and December 1963 would be made available Wednesday, both in Austin and at the National Archives in Washington.Lewis Gould, a University of Texas history professor who helped review the tapes, said Friday that, although they contain a few historical tidbits, "Johnson's personality is going to impress people, more than any clues to the Kennedy assassination."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 21, 2007
The biggest mistake, by far, that well-intentioned laypeople make in concluding there was a conspiracy in the Kennedy assassination, and the biggest argument, by far, that conspiracy theorists use in their books to support their position of a conspiracy, is to maintain that such and such a group `had a motive' to kill Kennedy and, therefore, must have done it." - VINCENT BUGLIOSI, writing in his new book "Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy"
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