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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 5, 1997
"The Advocate's Devil" would be just another run-of-the-mill, Sunday-night network movie, except for one thing: Ken Olin.Olin's starring performance as a high-profile defense attorney who has hit a patch of bad luck isn't of the flashy or knockout variety that tends to get noticed by critics. Instead, it's one of those almost invisible acting efforts that make you forget about the actor and believe in the character instantly -- the kind you almost always seem to get with Paul Newman.Olin's character, Abe Ringel, is not an easy guy to believe in or, possibly, even care about.
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By DAVID ZURAWIK | November 25, 2007
Don't come looking for good tidings, joy and phony holiday sentiment in this list. It is a weird group, but these are my favorites, for better or worse - and all are available on DVD. 1. Truman Capote's A Christmas Memory. Set in the Great Depression and narrated by the author himself, this touching and classy 1966 production for ABC tells the story of an outcast boy and his eccentric aunt as they set out to bake fruitcakes for the holiday - even for people who are mean to them. 2. Thirtysomething - "Mike Van Dyke."
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 26, 1996
It might be hard to imagine a gritty, urban cop drama looking grittier or more urban than "NYPD Blue" or "Homicide." But that's the case with "EZ Streets," a new series starring Ken Olin and Jason Gedrick that premieres tomorrow night on CBS."EZ Streets" is set in a "mythical American city" but it uses filmed exteriors and street scenes from Detroit and Chicago that look like Dresden after World War II or Beirut today. It is an urban landscape so grim and bleak that it makes "Blade Runner" seem positively sunny.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 17, 2002
I feel like I should be more excited about Breaking News, Bravo's new prime-time drama about life backstage at an all-news cable channel. It has a hard-charging, fast-paced and intelligent pilot, as well as impressive talent both in front of and behind the camera. Yet, whereas watching the first five hours of HBO's The Wire or the first four of Showtime's Street Time back to back on preview cassettes seemed like a critic's holiday, screening the first six hours of Breaking News was mostly work by Episode Two. Maybe it's just that I know too much about television news after covering it for 25 years - like the fact that all the talk about the public's right to know by these characters is a load of bull - to suspend disbelief enough to buy into the drama even a little bit. I truly think, though, that it's not just me. I suspect one of the reasons that so many newsroom dramas (such as ABC's The Beast)
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | November 25, 2007
Don't come looking for good tidings, joy and phony holiday sentiment in this list. It is a weird group, but these are my favorites, for better or worse - and all are available on DVD. 1. Truman Capote's A Christmas Memory. Set in the Great Depression and narrated by the author himself, this touching and classy 1966 production for ABC tells the story of an outcast boy and his eccentric aunt as they set out to bake fruitcakes for the holiday - even for people who are mean to them. 2. Thirtysomething - "Mike Van Dyke."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | September 3, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Were Michael (Ken Olin) and Hope (Mel Harris) going to stay together or finally split? It remained to be seen in the ambiguous final episode of ABC's "thirtysomething."With the apparent collapse of a movie deal that would have better resolved things, it's still an open question. But you can watch the final segment again tonight (at 10, Channel 13) for any clues to make you feel more comfortable.It was an odd way to end a popular series, and many viewers hoped a movie finale might better tie up loose ends in the story.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 17, 2002
I feel like I should be more excited about Breaking News, Bravo's new prime-time drama about life backstage at an all-news cable channel. It has a hard-charging, fast-paced and intelligent pilot, as well as impressive talent both in front of and behind the camera. Yet, whereas watching the first five hours of HBO's The Wire or the first four of Showtime's Street Time back to back on preview cassettes seemed like a critic's holiday, screening the first six hours of Breaking News was mostly work by Episode Two. Maybe it's just that I know too much about television news after covering it for 25 years - like the fact that all the talk about the public's right to know by these characters is a load of bull - to suspend disbelief enough to buy into the drama even a little bit. I truly think, though, that it's not just me. I suspect one of the reasons that so many newsroom dramas (such as ABC's The Beast)
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By New York Times | December 28, 1990
Taylor Hackford is trading in New Visions for new visions.tTC After some two and a half years devoted to the producing side of his producer and director personality, Hackford, whose credits as producer and director include such films as "An Officer and a Gentleman," "Against All Odds," "Everybody's All American" and Bamba," is writing finis to the story of his New Visions Pictures company and returning to directing.But the company, which functioned as a small studio, leaves a legacy. There is Richard Pearce's "Long Walk Home," a story of the 1955 bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala., starring Sissy Spacek as a prosperous housewife and Whoopi Goldberg as her maid.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | April 15, 1994
In "White Fang 2: Myth of the White Wolf," the Native Americans appear to have been dressed by that great medicine man Ralph Lauren of the tribe Polo. Really, they're all in these exquisitely color-coordinated, distressed-cotton plaid outfits that suggest the designer's new Double-R line of rough 'n' ready outdoor wear.Possibly, that suggests the level of authenticity in the new Disney movie, which is less than zero. Only the mountains are real, and if they could have shot it in Orlando with the plastic Matterhorn as a backdrop, they would have.
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By Michael Hill | September 25, 1990
"Goodnight Sweet Wife: A Murder in Boston" would have been a better movie if it had gone one way or the other, become an exploitative film that took us into the innards of yet another sicko American family, or a socially relevant commentary on the resonance of racism in American society.But, like so many products of executive producer Arnold Shapiro -- he does "Rescue 911," a show that exploits emergencies and personal tragedies but also gives useful lifesaving tips -- "Goodnight Sweet Wife" tries to walk down both sides of the street.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 5, 1997
"The Advocate's Devil" would be just another run-of-the-mill, Sunday-night network movie, except for one thing: Ken Olin.Olin's starring performance as a high-profile defense attorney who has hit a patch of bad luck isn't of the flashy or knockout variety that tends to get noticed by critics. Instead, it's one of those almost invisible acting efforts that make you forget about the actor and believe in the character instantly -- the kind you almost always seem to get with Paul Newman.Olin's character, Abe Ringel, is not an easy guy to believe in or, possibly, even care about.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 26, 1996
It might be hard to imagine a gritty, urban cop drama looking grittier or more urban than "NYPD Blue" or "Homicide." But that's the case with "EZ Streets," a new series starring Ken Olin and Jason Gedrick that premieres tomorrow night on CBS."EZ Streets" is set in a "mythical American city" but it uses filmed exteriors and street scenes from Detroit and Chicago that look like Dresden after World War II or Beirut today. It is an urban landscape so grim and bleak that it makes "Blade Runner" seem positively sunny.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | September 3, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Were Michael (Ken Olin) and Hope (Mel Harris) going to stay together or finally split? It remained to be seen in the ambiguous final episode of ABC's "thirtysomething."With the apparent collapse of a movie deal that would have better resolved things, it's still an open question. But you can watch the final segment again tonight (at 10, Channel 13) for any clues to make you feel more comfortable.It was an odd way to end a popular series, and many viewers hoped a movie finale might better tie up loose ends in the story.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 23, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- As if the show's cancellation in May wasn't enough, there was more bad news yesterday for "thirtysomething" fans.Contrary to previous announcements, ABC will not tie up loose ends from the series with one or more made-for-TV movies involving the characters, said Robert A. Iger, president of ABC Entertainment."
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
A pair of long-anticipated weddings arrive among several season-ending episodes, and the residents of "Full House" bring that series to a conclusion after eight seasons.* "Full House" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- An hour-long episode full of flashbacks brings the popular family series to a conclusion. Michelle (Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen), a baby when the series began, suffers amnesia after falling off a horse and Danny (Bob Saget) suffers guilt for urging her into an equestrian meet.
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