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By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Contributing writer | May 22, 1991
Like St. Paul, a tentmaker, Ken Miller has to earn a living before he can preach the Gospel. For him, that means selling gasoline -- and cigarettes, candy, soda and all the other items carried by his service station's ministore.While he "hates to promote bad habits," thecharismatic preacher from North Laurel knows he needs his secular job -- cigarette sales included -- to support his wife, Tony, and five children.On a busy afternoon, Miller, a sandy-haired man in a white Exxon shirt with "Manager" written in red on the pocket, greets his customers, punches the cash register, makes change at the Crofton Exxon station.
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NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Contributing writer | May 22, 1991
Like St. Paul, a tentmaker, Ken Miller has to earn a living before he can preach the Gospel. For him, that means selling gasoline -- and cigarettes, candy, soda and all the other items carried by his service station's ministore.While he "hates to promote bad habits," thecharismatic preacher from North Laurel knows he needs his secular job -- cigarette sales included -- to support his wife, Tony, and five children.On a busy afternoon, Miller, a sandy-haired man in a white Exxon shirt with "Manager" written in red on the pocket, greets his customers, punches the cash register, makes change at the Crofton Exxon station.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter | April 6, 2007
Scientists say Earth's climate has warmed 1.4 degrees Fahrenheit in the last century. But Ken Miller of Glen Burnie asks, "What baseline for calibration was used then and now? I am sure they are different. How can we believe this is right?" Climatologist Robert Henson says three major groups here and abroad track temperatures in different ways, using the longest, most reliable data sets each can find. They differ on what the global temperature is, but they agree closely on the increase.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2007
BUNGALOWS GWYNN OAK 2006 Windsor Place-- $189,900 The property -- three bedrooms, one bath, 832 square feet Taxes -- $1,966 Features -- Located in the Windsor Terrace neighborhood in Baltimore County, this 1935 bungalow has an above-ground swimming pool and a new privacy fence. The kitchen, windows and bath also have been updated. BALTIMORE CITY 3109 Louise Ave. -- $229,900 The property -- three bedrooms, two baths, 1,240 square feet Taxes -- $2,991 Features -- This updated bungalow, originally built in 1926, has new paint and Berber carpet, refinished hardwood floors, finished basement, hot tub, a patio with a fenced backyard and a one-car garage.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 30, 1990
KENNEDYVILLE -- Farmers are a curious breed. They're always keeping an eye on their neighbor's fields and his farming practices. But this year, farmers around this rural Kent County community are paying more attention then ever to Gary Miller's corn crop.Gary Miller and his three brothers run 3-M's Farm, a grain-growing operation that spreads over 3,000 acres of some of the flattest land in all of Maryland. But it's just a small patch of their farm -- a 400-acre cornfield that butts up against Turner's Creek -- that captured the attention of farmers throughout the county and around much of the rest of the state this year.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 18, 1997
NEW YORK - New York City's diet of culture and entertainment is so rich that many residents are hard pressed to sample even a small part of the exhibitions, concerts, readings, walking tours and must-try restaurants that vie for attention. And now they have Philadelphia to consider.Philadelphia has begun a television advertising campaign in the New York market to woo people within driving distance to visit the city and its countryside. Each colorful spot features a different celebrity: the comedian Bill Cosby, the actor Kevin Bacon, the fashion designer Nicole Miller, the basketball player Julius Erving, and the filmmaker Ken Burns.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gus Sentementes and Gina Davis and Gus Sentementes,Sun reporters | March 13, 2008
For a recent assignment in art class at Woodlawn High School, 15-year-old Tyisha M. Brown drew a stress ball and filled it with words such as "family" and "friends" to represent troubles in her life, a classmate recalled yesterday. "We could draw anything we wanted to show how we felt," said Briana Baldwin, 16. "She showed a lot of emotion in her work. You could see a lot of emotions in that ball." Baldwin said students and teachers wondered why Brown suddenly stopped coming to class a few weeks ago. Some, she said, assumed that Brown's grandmother, with whom she was living in Woodlawn, had sent her to stay with her mother in the Park Heights area.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1998
Military identification cards and the equipment used to create them have been stolen from the Army's personnel office at Fort Meade, investigators and military sources said yesterday.The equipment could create bogus cards that would be approved by the gatehouses of military bases around the world. In the past, blank ID cards stolen from military bases have been used in rings that cashed stolen checks at military bases.The missing equipment includes a mug-shot camera, a box of 200 blank ID cards, a laminating machine and a device that imprints a three-dimensional hologram on the laminated card -- all that's needed to create an ID that could give the user access to unrestricted areas of military installations.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb | January 15, 1991
The Baltimore Road Runners Club kicked off its 1991 championship series Sunday with a 10-mile run through the Loch Raven watershed.The number of entries increased for the third straight year. In 1989, the field grew by 20 to 120, and last year, the field grew by another 20. There were 160 entries in Sunday's field.Robert Yara and Marge Rosasco won the open divisions of the race -- Yara by 16 seconds over Jack Peach and Rosasco by 1 minute, 14 seconds over Stacey Nicholson.Dave Lowe, who won the masters in 58:20, finishing 14th overall, hopes to pick up where he left off in last year's championship.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb and Michael Reeb,Staff Writer | April 13, 1993
Applications for the 1993 New York City Marathon -- to be run Nov. 14 -- will be accepted after May 19.Applicants should send a self-addressed, No. 10 envelope and a $5 non-refundable check or money order to: Marathon Entries, P.O. Box 1388 GPO, New York, N.Y. 10116. Checks should be made payable to the New York Road Runners Club.All requests must be postmarked May 19 or later. Twenty-five thousand entrants will be chosen: 12,000 on a first-come, first-serve basis, 8,000 for international entrants and 5,000 in a lottery held in July.
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb | April 9, 1991
Pat Santarone has passed his rake to Paul Zwaska, his successor as Baltimore Orioles groundskeeper, but Sunday at Memorial Stadium, the message was the same: Keep off the grass. That didn't matter to the 895 finishers in the third annual Oriole Advocates Home Run 8K, who came around the warning track for the finish along the first-base line.In the lead was Brad Uhlfelder, who had a 150-yard lead on Gerry Clapper en route to his 25 minute, 15-second finish in the Home Run."He's as hot as a firecracker," fifth-place finisher Ken Miller said about Uhlfelder, who won the Maryvale race and the St. Patrick's Day 5K this spring.
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