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Ken Mehlman

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By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2010
In another context, Gloria Steinem had the perfect comeback. Told that she didn't look her age, the glamorous feminist said, "This is what 50 looks like. " Well, this is what gay looks like: Ken Mehlman. The former Republican national chairman, who grew up in Pikesville, publically came out last week and instantly set the punditry class abuzz. Not so much over the idea that a single, 43-year-old man who recently moved to New York's Chelsea neighborhood turned out to be gay — welcome to the cabaret, ol' chum!
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2011
Ken Mehlman has been an open member of the club for less than a year, but he's already made its "who's who" list. The Baltimore native who served as a campaign manager for President George W. Bush in 2004 and chaired the Republican National Committee from 2005 to 2007 told the world he was gay in an interview with The Atlantic in August. Now he's made New York Observer's list of The New Power Gays : NYC's Top 50. Writes one reader, annoyed that Mehlman remained in the closet as the party he led pursued an anti-gay agenda: "We could have used your help 8 years ago. Thanks anyway.
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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 2005
LIVONIA, Mich. - Clever sound bites didn't earn Ken Mehlman his job as head of the Republican National Committee. He ground his way to the top less glamorously - by mastering the nuts and bolts of campaign mechanics and staying rock-solid loyal to President Bush. Still, Mehlman had a snappy retort ready after Democratic Chairman Howard Dean recently characterized the Republicans as "pretty much a white, Christian party." Mehlman responded by telling the Fox News Channel: "A lot of the folks who attended my bar mitzvah would be surprised to learn that."
NEWS
August 30, 2010
Ken Mehlman probably should not expect a fond embrace from the gay community, at least not right away. The Pikesville native outed himself last week in the Atlantic magazine and pledged to lobby for same-sex marriage. But the memories of his days as campaign manager for George W. Bush — and the Republican president's gay-bashing reelection strategy — live painfully on. In the interview, Mr. Mehlman explains that he only recently recognized his identity. "It has taken 43 years for me to get comfortable with this part of my life," says the former Republican National Committee chairman who now makes astronomical wages as an executive vice-president for a major private equity firm in Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2011
Ken Mehlman has been an open member of the club for less than a year, but he's already made its "who's who" list. The Baltimore native who served as a campaign manager for President George W. Bush in 2004 and chaired the Republican National Committee from 2005 to 2007 told the world he was gay in an interview with The Atlantic in August. Now he's made New York Observer's list of The New Power Gays : NYC's Top 50. Writes one reader, annoyed that Mehlman remained in the closet as the party he led pursued an anti-gay agenda: "We could have used your help 8 years ago. Thanks anyway.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | February 18, 2006
Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele lost his communications director this week, marking the second top-level staffer to leave his U.S. Senate campaign since the beginning of the year. Leonardo Alcivar, who served since October as Steele's spokesman, resigned Wednesday. A veteran of New York politics who worked for Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, Alcivar was a much-heralded addition to Steele's team, helping launch the lieutenant governor's campaign. The latest departure comes just a week after Steele, a Republican, offended an audience of Baltimore Jewish leaders when he compared embryonic stem cell research to the experiments of Nazi doctors, a statement that made national news and prompted a swift apology from Steele.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun Reporter | October 15, 2006
Whistling Past Dixie: How Democrats Can Win Without the South Thomas F. Schaller Simon & Schuster / 336 pages / $26 Southern voters have been an important component of Republican and Democratic presidential victories for more than four decades. Since the 1964 passage of the Civil Rights Act, GOP presidential candidates have actively courted white Sutherners and convinced them that the party supports their economic and moral positions. Employing what has come to be known as a "Southern Strategy," party nominees have regularly carried such states as Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and South Carolina as presidents from Richard Nixon to Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush won the White House.
NEWS
August 30, 2010
Ken Mehlman probably should not expect a fond embrace from the gay community, at least not right away. The Pikesville native outed himself last week in the Atlantic magazine and pledged to lobby for same-sex marriage. But the memories of his days as campaign manager for George W. Bush — and the Republican president's gay-bashing reelection strategy — live painfully on. In the interview, Mr. Mehlman explains that he only recently recognized his identity. "It has taken 43 years for me to get comfortable with this part of my life," says the former Republican National Committee chairman who now makes astronomical wages as an executive vice-president for a major private equity firm in Manhattan.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | August 29, 2012
Former Gov. Robert Ehrlich's chief of staff said this evening that he supports same-sex marriage, becoming one of the highest profile Republicans in the state to add his voice to the pro-gay marriage cause. Chip DiPaula wrote in an email to gay marriage supporters that "freedom is not a Democratic or Republican value. It is an American value. " DiPaula noted that former Vice President Dick Cheney and former RNC chair Ken Mehlman also support the cause. Cheney's daughter is gay and Mehlmen is set to appear next month at a star-studded fundraiser for Maryland's same-sex marriage law. The state is set to have an ususally crowded ballot in November.
NEWS
October 22, 2005
On Thursday, October 20, 2005, HAROLD GREENWALD, beloved husband of Lillian Greenwald (nee Schofer), dear father of Dr. Senna Greenwald of Rockville, MD and Judy Mehlman of Pikesville, MD, beloved father-in-law of Arthur Mehlman, adored grandfather of Ken Mehlman of Washington, D.C., Bruce and Amy Mehlman of Potomac, MD, loving great-grandfather of Jake, Mike, and Julia Mehlman, devoted brother of the late Betty Lieberman, Katharine (Kitty) Wolberg, Ethel Rackmales, Jack and Joseph Greenwald.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2010
In another context, Gloria Steinem had the perfect comeback. Told that she didn't look her age, the glamorous feminist said, "This is what 50 looks like. " Well, this is what gay looks like: Ken Mehlman. The former Republican national chairman, who grew up in Pikesville, publically came out last week and instantly set the punditry class abuzz. Not so much over the idea that a single, 43-year-old man who recently moved to New York's Chelsea neighborhood turned out to be gay — welcome to the cabaret, ol' chum!
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun Reporter | October 15, 2006
Whistling Past Dixie: How Democrats Can Win Without the South Thomas F. Schaller Simon & Schuster / 336 pages / $26 Southern voters have been an important component of Republican and Democratic presidential victories for more than four decades. Since the 1964 passage of the Civil Rights Act, GOP presidential candidates have actively courted white Sutherners and convinced them that the party supports their economic and moral positions. Employing what has come to be known as a "Southern Strategy," party nominees have regularly carried such states as Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and South Carolina as presidents from Richard Nixon to Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush won the White House.
NEWS
By JENNIFER SKALKA and JENNIFER SKALKA,SUN REPORTER | February 18, 2006
Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele lost his communications director this week, marking the second top-level staffer to leave his U.S. Senate campaign since the beginning of the year. Leonardo Alcivar, who served since October as Steele's spokesman, resigned Wednesday. A veteran of New York politics who worked for Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, Alcivar was a much-heralded addition to Steele's team, helping launch the lieutenant governor's campaign. The latest departure comes just a week after Steele, a Republican, offended an audience of Baltimore Jewish leaders when he compared embryonic stem cell research to the experiments of Nazi doctors, a statement that made national news and prompted a swift apology from Steele.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 27, 2005
LIVONIA, Mich. - Clever sound bites didn't earn Ken Mehlman his job as head of the Republican National Committee. He ground his way to the top less glamorously - by mastering the nuts and bolts of campaign mechanics and staying rock-solid loyal to President Bush. Still, Mehlman had a snappy retort ready after Democratic Chairman Howard Dean recently characterized the Republicans as "pretty much a white, Christian party." Mehlman responded by telling the Fox News Channel: "A lot of the folks who attended my bar mitzvah would be surprised to learn that."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 9, 2005
NEW YORK -- Encouraged by New York Republican leaders and some White House officials, Jeanine F. Pirro, the Westchester County district attorney, announced yesterday that she will challenge Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton next year. She immediately accused Clinton of using her post as a steppingstone to the presidency. Pirro, a political moderate who supports abortion rights, gay rights and the death penalty, is seen by many Republicans in New York and Washington as their best hope of pulling off an upset in 2006 by ousting Clinton.
NEWS
November 20, 2005
High court rules against state An Annapolis youth accused of killing a businessman near the State House will not face state charges after the Supreme Court threw out the prosecutors' appeal. The court passed on an opportunity to clarify one of the so-called Miranda warnings that govern police interrogations. Mayor picks city health chief Dr. Joshua Sharfstein was named Baltimore's health commissioner. Mayor Martin O'Malley picked Sharfstein, a pediatrician, to replace Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, who resigned to run for Congress.
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