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Ken Ludwig

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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 21, 2003
"I'm a crazed human being," says Ken Ludwig. It's only September, and already this is shaping up to be the biggest - and busiest - season of his career. And that's saying something for the Washington-based Broadway playwright, who used to juggle a full-time law career with playwriting. Right now, he's juggling five shows at once - a situation he finds exhilarating and exhausting. Two of those shows are receiving simultaneous world premieres in the Washington area. Twentieth Century, his rewrite of Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur's 1932 comedy, opened the season at Signature Theatre in Arlington, Va., and will be produced on Broadway in March.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2014
When Ken Ludwig's golf farce, "The Fox on the Fairway" premiered at Signature Theatre in Arlington, Va., in 2010, the prolific playwright described his work as "a tribute to the classic English farces of the 1930s and 1940s. " In Prince George's Little Theatre's current production at Bowie Playhouse, Ludwig's goal is realized, exposing insanity on the golf course and in the clubhouse - at least by enthusiasts with their outrageous costumes. The show finds the heads of two rival golf clubs - Dickie Bell of the Crouching Squirrel and Henry Bingham of the Quail Valley Club -- plotting strategies to defeat the other in an imminent tournament.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 20, 2000
The folks at Paragon Theatre are hoping that history will repeat itself with another hit when Ken Ludwig's "Moon Over Buffalo" opens tomorrow night. In January, they had their biggest hit to date with Ludwig's "Lend Me a Tenor," when most performances played to capacity audiences. Like "Tenor," this fast-paced farce also promises plenty of laughs to the audiences at Trifles Restaurant in Crownsville. "Moon Over Buffalo" was an instant hit when it opened on Broadway in October 1995. After a 30-year absence, Carol Burnett was lured back to Broadway to the role of Charlotte Hay, a nearly washed-up, long-married stage actress, who dreams of starring in a Frank Capra film.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Prince George's Little Theatre is opening its 54th season with a stellar production of the 1932 madcap comedy "Twentieth Century," a product of the late, legendary Broadway and Hollywood writing team Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur. "Twentieth Century," which became a successful film in 1934, is credited by PGLT with establishing many of the essential ingredients that characterize the great screwball comedies of the 1930s: "a dizzy dame, a charming but befuddled hero, dazzling dialogue and a dash of slapstick.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 14, 2002
There's something comfortably familiar about 2nd Star's current production of Ken Ludwig's Moon Over Buffalo, playing through March 23 at Bowie Playhouse in White Marsh Park. The play features many of the actors we enjoyed last spring in the company's hilarious version of Ludwig's big hit Lend Me a Tenor. In the current play, the group exploits a wealth of humor in a somewhat weaker play. The story is set in 1953 in Buffalo, where actors Charlotte and George Hay have returned to the stage in a run-down theater managed by Charlotte's mother, Ethel.
NEWS
February 16, 2013
The Parkville High School Knight Players, under the co-direction of Steve Devorah and Lisa Moose, will host its final performance of this year's dramatic production, "A Midsummer Night's Jersey. " on Saturday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m., at the school, 2600 Putty Hill Avenue in Parkville. Written by Ken Ludwig for high school actors, the play blends Shakespeare's “A Midsummer Night's Dream” with reality TV's “Jersey Shore.” Tickets are available at the door of the school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 1, 1999
Ken Ludwig's 1995 Broadway comedy, "Moon Over Buffalo," will make its Baltimore premiere at the Vagabond Players with a five-weekend run beginning tomorrow. Written by the Washington-based author of "Lend Me a Tenor," "Moon Over Buffalo" focuses on a pair of feuding husband-and-wife actors who are performing "Private Lives" and "Cyrano de Bergerac" in repertory in Buffalo, N.Y., in the 1950s.The Vagabonds' production is directed by Steve Goldklang and stars Lynda McClary and Dave Gamble. Ludwig's play was the subject of a 1997 backstage documentary film by Chris Hegedus and D.A. Pennebaker.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | March 14, 1993
The Fudo Myoh-oh, a 33-foot-tall, 7-ton sculpture carved at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, will find a permanent home at Becton Dickinson's corporate headquarters in Franklin Lakes, N.J., according to the college.The Alaskan cedar sculpture, which was carved by three Japanese sculptors -- Yasuhiko Hashimoto, Jinichi Itoh and Isao Yanaguimoto -- is the largest Fudo Myoh-oh in the world. The Fudo Myoh-oh, or "immovable God of Light" is a reincarnation of the Cosmic Buddha, an angry warrior-like Buddha that represents the Buddha's power against evil.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | March 5, 2008
March roared in like a laughing lion at Bowie Playhouse with 2nd Star Productions' opening of Ken Ludwig's comedy Leading Ladies. I laughed so often and so loudly on Saturday that I nearly lost my critic's anonymity, along with my dignity. It was comic relief for everyone tired of grappling with tax forms and hearing political campaign rhetoric. Ludwig's 2004 show is in the farcical tradition of his earlier hits, Lend Me a Tenor and Moon Over Buffalo, filled with colorful characters, coincidences, mistaken identities, an improbable plot and familiar one-liners to provide easy laughs appropriate to its nostalgic 1958 small-town setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2006
Totem Pole's summer The lowdown -- Totem Pole Playhouse, the summer theater in Fayetteville, Pa., opens its 56th season Saturday with a play about another summer pastime - baseball. Richard Dresser's Rounding Third is a bristlingly comic account of two diametrically opposed Little League dads. The season opener stars TJ Edwards and Paris Peet and is directed by Baltimorean Wil Love, Totem Pole's associate artistic director. Here's the rest of the Totem Pole lineup: I'll Be Back Before Midnight!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Picture it: England, 1707. Two guys who have run out of money decide to seek out and successfully woo rich women. They take turns playing master and servant as they roam the countryside in their quest, which leads them to the town of Lichfield and some very promising prospects. That set-up leads to all sorts of crazy things in George Farquhar's "The Beaux' Stratagem," one of the classics of Restoration Comedy, the genre that flourished for several decades after Charles II assumed the British throne in 1660.
NEWS
February 16, 2013
The Parkville High School Knight Players, under the co-direction of Steve Devorah and Lisa Moose, will host its final performance of this year's dramatic production, "A Midsummer Night's Jersey. " on Saturday, Feb. 16, 8 p.m., at the school, 2600 Putty Hill Avenue in Parkville. Written by Ken Ludwig for high school actors, the play blends Shakespeare's “A Midsummer Night's Dream” with reality TV's “Jersey Shore.” Tickets are available at the door of the school.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
Master playwright Ken Ludwig set the play "Moon Over Buffalo" in 1953, a time when struggling veteran actors George and Charlotte Hay are alternately performing "Cyrano de Bergerac" and Noel Coward's "Private Lives" at Buffalo's shabby Erlanger Theatre. The decidedly un-shabby Bowie Playhouse is the current home for Prince George's Little Theatre's bright production of "Moon Over Buffalo," running through Feb. 16. In this work, Ludwig creates sturdy plots featuring mistaken identities and frantic characters who run into and away from one another's complaints, slamming doors as they go. The plot centers on George and Charlotte, former theater headliners who are now broke in Buffalo, with unpaid actors leaving their troupe.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2011
The Pasadena Theatre Company returns to the Chesapeake Arts Center Studio 194 Theatre to present Ken Ludwig's 1989 Tony Award-winning comedy "Lend Me a Tenor," which opens on Saturday, June 4, for a three-weekend run. This return to Chesapeake Arts Center might be termed a kind of homecoming. During its 32-year history, the Pasadena Theatre Company has performed at several county venues, recently most often at AACC's Pascal Center and Humanities Recital Hall. At a recent rehearsal, PTC President Sharon Steele said, "We are pleased to be back … with our current show and we know 'Lend Me a Tenor' will be a great fit here, where we also hope to do lots of shows.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,Special to The Sun | March 5, 2008
March roared in like a laughing lion at Bowie Playhouse with 2nd Star Productions' opening of Ken Ludwig's comedy Leading Ladies. I laughed so often and so loudly on Saturday that I nearly lost my critic's anonymity, along with my dignity. It was comic relief for everyone tired of grappling with tax forms and hearing political campaign rhetoric. Ludwig's 2004 show is in the farcical tradition of his earlier hits, Lend Me a Tenor and Moon Over Buffalo, filled with colorful characters, coincidences, mistaken identities, an improbable plot and familiar one-liners to provide easy laughs appropriate to its nostalgic 1958 small-town setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2006
Verdi's `Nabucco' The lowdown -- To the uninitiated, Nabucco might sound like another Japanese puzzle, but to opera fans it means a stirring drama with music to match. Nabucco (the Italianized name for Nebuchadnezzar) was Guiseppe Verdi's first great hit. In addition to telling a tale of Babylonian captivity of the Hebrews, the opera conveyed a subtle political message that galvanized the composer's Italian public, a message about freedom from foreign domination. Baltimore Opera Company unveils a new production of Nabucco this week starring vibrant baritone Mark Rucker in the title role.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2011
The Pasadena Theatre Company returns to the Chesapeake Arts Center Studio 194 Theatre to present Ken Ludwig's 1989 Tony Award-winning comedy "Lend Me a Tenor," which opens on Saturday, June 4, for a three-weekend run. This return to Chesapeake Arts Center might be termed a kind of homecoming. During its 32-year history, the Pasadena Theatre Company has performed at several county venues, recently most often at AACC's Pascal Center and Humanities Recital Hall. At a recent rehearsal, PTC President Sharon Steele said, "We are pleased to be back … with our current show and we know 'Lend Me a Tenor' will be a great fit here, where we also hope to do lots of shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
Picture it: England, 1707. Two guys who have run out of money decide to seek out and successfully woo rich women. They take turns playing master and servant as they roam the countryside in their quest, which leads them to the town of Lichfield and some very promising prospects. That set-up leads to all sorts of crazy things in George Farquhar's "The Beaux' Stratagem," one of the classics of Restoration Comedy, the genre that flourished for several decades after Charles II assumed the British throne in 1660.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2006
Totem Pole's summer The lowdown -- Totem Pole Playhouse, the summer theater in Fayetteville, Pa., opens its 56th season Saturday with a play about another summer pastime - baseball. Richard Dresser's Rounding Third is a bristlingly comic account of two diametrically opposed Little League dads. The season opener stars TJ Edwards and Paris Peet and is directed by Baltimorean Wil Love, Totem Pole's associate artistic director. Here's the rest of the Totem Pole lineup: I'll Be Back Before Midnight!
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 29, 2005
Just as Edna Garrett used to dispense advice as the housemother in the long-running NBC TV series The Facts of Life, Charlotte Rae, the actress who played Mrs. Garrett, tries to offer guidance to her Washington cab driver. The driver is lost. After making several references to traffic circles and Connecticut Avenue, Rae finally says: "Now we're getting there." Then, with her destination in sight, she decides she's close enough and asks the driver to simply let her out. Rae is in Washington appearing in the East Coast premiere of Leading Ladies, a new comedy at Ford's Theatre by D.C. lawyer-turned-playwright Ken Ludwig (Lend Me a Tenor)
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