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By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2010
The jury in the trial of three men accused of the murder of Kenneth N. Harris had two questions Monday - neither of which the judge answered. In the first, jurors wondered how many guns had been used in the hold-up of the New Haven Lounge, to which retired Baltimore Circuit Judge David Ross responded that the jury should study the evidence at its disposal. The second question was whether Jerome Williams, the youngest of the defendants, was holding a gun during the crime. The judge's answer was the same.
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NEWS
By Nicole Harris-Crest | October 25, 2010
I was thrilled to learn that Baltimore recently received a federal Smart Policing Grant to fund and evaluate gun-suppression efforts. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's commitment to reduce gun violence and increase public safety is commendable. Together, the mayor and Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III have worked to achieve significant decreases in violent crime, compared to past years. Specifically, weekend violence is down by almost 16 percent. Still, gun violence exists.
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NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vozzella.@baltsun.com | September 24, 2008
It only looked like Ken Harris loved being on TV. When there was a hot issue in Baltimore - schools, crime, convention center hotel - the city councilman spoke out, then tuned in. But what he saw on the evening news rarely satisfied. "His wife told me he'd come home and watch the tape over and over ... and see how he could improve himself," said City Councilman Nick D'Adamo, a good friend. " 'I was sweating too much. I was too nervous.' He used to talk in front of the mirror and practice his speech."
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2010
The jury in the trial of three men accused of the murder of Kenneth N. Harris had two questions Monday - neither of which the judge answered. In the first, jurors wondered how many guns had been used in the hold-up of the New Haven Lounge, to which retired Baltimore Circuit Judge David Ross responded that the jury should study the evidence at its disposal. The second question was whether Jerome Williams, the youngest of the defendants, was holding a gun during the crime. The judge's answer was the same.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | September 26, 2008
Kenneth N. Harris Sr. could have very easily taken a different path. He could have been like so many other children of 16-year-old single mothers in Baltimore's forgotten neighborhoods, and taken the route that eschews education and accomplishment for the lure of streets ruled by violence played out amid a cancerous drug epidemic. He could have spurned responsibility, assumed the mantle of a victim of limited opportunities, and fallen in with the crowd that wallows in nihilism. But he did not. And so he did not allow us the luxury of ignoring his murder, as we do so many other acts of violence that are more commonplace than we wish to acknowledge.
NEWS
September 6, 2007
Kenneth N. Harris Sr., a two-term city councilman, begins today airing his first television commercial of this year's City Council president race. The 30-second spot will air on all four local network affiliates and will run through election day Tuesday. This is the fourth television ad of this year's four-way Democratic primary for City Council president. What the ad says: The commercial opens with a shot of City Hall and upbeat music. "The Sun says Kenneth N. Harris Sr. `is a City Council member with an independent streak, and he displays an admirable passion and energy,'" a female narrator says, as the ad shows a picture of the council president endorsement editorial published Sunday by The Sun. Harris is shown walking in front of City Hall, and a photo of Harris with his wife and children is also displayed.
NEWS
September 25, 2008
Harris' death costs city a dear friend Here in the 4th District, Ken Harris was known - and will forever be known - as a friend to neighborhoods ("Harris' killing stuns residents, colleagues," Sept. 21). Having served as a neighborhood association president, he understood the slings and arrows of urban living that neighborhood leaders face: crime, grime, deteriorated housing and commercial enterprises that add no value to the community. With his irrepressible positive attitude, Mr. Harris set a new standard for constituent service in this council district.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
The ones with the guns don't realize what they destroy; they're too violent, self-centered and callous to see anything beyond the moment in front of them - and it doesn't seem to matter who's standing there in the dark. Baltimore needed Ken Harris. He was one of those "community organizers" who got involved for the greater good while others just yawned. Back in the 1990s, he was president of his community association and led an effort to get the police to pay more attention to his neighborhood.
NEWS
September 23, 2008
The killers of former Baltimore Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr. have shattered the hope that Baltimore is safer because there are fewer homicides. The trio of robbers who hid behind scary masks and guns has shown again that anyone can be a target of violence, including a man who worked hard to make this city a better place for men and women of all walks of life. Raised by a single mother, Mr. Harris worked four jobs to get himself through Morgan State University. He began his community work in his neighborhood and he understood the importance of respect, whereas the thugs who killed him had no respect for human life; they were only too willing to end one in the brief moment it takes to fire a gun. Confronted as he left a popular jazz club in Northeast Baltimore, Mr. Harris ran to his car. His assailants murdered a husband and father of two who had spent the past decade working to change things that he thought were wrong or unjust or unfair.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | November 14, 2008
D aren Muhammad has been kicked off the WOLB airwaves and, wouldn't you know it, there's a conspiracy there. For years, Muhammad has had a public-affairs show, the radio equivalent of vanity publishing: He paid the station to air it. He offered city politics chitchat juiced up with cloak-and-dagger stuff, like how the deaths of former City Councilman Ken Harris in September, city contractor Robert Lee Clay in 2005 and federal prosecutor Jonathan Luna...
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | November 14, 2008
D aren Muhammad has been kicked off the WOLB airwaves and, wouldn't you know it, there's a conspiracy there. For years, Muhammad has had a public-affairs show, the radio equivalent of vanity publishing: He paid the station to air it. He offered city politics chitchat juiced up with cloak-and-dagger stuff, like how the deaths of former City Councilman Ken Harris in September, city contractor Robert Lee Clay in 2005 and federal prosecutor Jonathan Luna...
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | September 26, 2008
Kenneth N. Harris Sr. could have very easily taken a different path. He could have been like so many other children of 16-year-old single mothers in Baltimore's forgotten neighborhoods, and taken the route that eschews education and accomplishment for the lure of streets ruled by violence played out amid a cancerous drug epidemic. He could have spurned responsibility, assumed the mantle of a victim of limited opportunities, and fallen in with the crowd that wallows in nihilism. But he did not. And so he did not allow us the luxury of ignoring his murder, as we do so many other acts of violence that are more commonplace than we wish to acknowledge.
NEWS
September 25, 2008
Harris' death costs city a dear friend Here in the 4th District, Ken Harris was known - and will forever be known - as a friend to neighborhoods ("Harris' killing stuns residents, colleagues," Sept. 21). Having served as a neighborhood association president, he understood the slings and arrows of urban living that neighborhood leaders face: crime, grime, deteriorated housing and commercial enterprises that add no value to the community. With his irrepressible positive attitude, Mr. Harris set a new standard for constituent service in this council district.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA and LAURA VOZZELLA,laura.vozzella.@baltsun.com | September 24, 2008
It only looked like Ken Harris loved being on TV. When there was a hot issue in Baltimore - schools, crime, convention center hotel - the city councilman spoke out, then tuned in. But what he saw on the evening news rarely satisfied. "His wife told me he'd come home and watch the tape over and over ... and see how he could improve himself," said City Councilman Nick D'Adamo, a good friend. " 'I was sweating too much. I was too nervous.' He used to talk in front of the mirror and practice his speech."
NEWS
September 23, 2008
The killers of former Baltimore Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr. have shattered the hope that Baltimore is safer because there are fewer homicides. The trio of robbers who hid behind scary masks and guns has shown again that anyone can be a target of violence, including a man who worked hard to make this city a better place for men and women of all walks of life. Raised by a single mother, Mr. Harris worked four jobs to get himself through Morgan State University. He began his community work in his neighborhood and he understood the importance of respect, whereas the thugs who killed him had no respect for human life; they were only too willing to end one in the brief moment it takes to fire a gun. Confronted as he left a popular jazz club in Northeast Baltimore, Mr. Harris ran to his car. His assailants murdered a husband and father of two who had spent the past decade working to change things that he thought were wrong or unjust or unfair.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS and DAN RODRICKS,dan.rodricks@baltsun.com | September 21, 2008
The ones with the guns don't realize what they destroy; they're too violent, self-centered and callous to see anything beyond the moment in front of them - and it doesn't seem to matter who's standing there in the dark. Baltimore needed Ken Harris. He was one of those "community organizers" who got involved for the greater good while others just yawned. Back in the 1990s, he was president of his community association and led an effort to get the police to pay more attention to his neighborhood.
NEWS
By Nicole Harris-Crest | October 25, 2010
I was thrilled to learn that Baltimore recently received a federal Smart Policing Grant to fund and evaluate gun-suppression efforts. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's commitment to reduce gun violence and increase public safety is commendable. Together, the mayor and Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III have worked to achieve significant decreases in violent crime, compared to past years. Specifically, weekend violence is down by almost 16 percent. Still, gun violence exists.
SPORTS
July 19, 1996
BaseballAngels: Optioned OF Orlando Palmeiro to Triple-A Vancouver.Expos: Recalled OF Yamil Benitez from Triple-A Ottawa. Signed OF Rob Lukachyk to minor-league contract; assigned him to Ottawa.Giants: Purchased contract of OF Jacob Cruz from Triple-A Phoenix. Optioned OF Dax Jones to Phoenix. Transferred OF Glenallen Hill to 60-day DL.CollegeSt. Andrews: Named Mark Peeler men's basketball coach.Southern Maine: Men's basketball coach Al Sokaitis resigned.FootballBears: Signed FB Tony Carter, G Todd Burger and WR Bobby Engram.
NEWS
September 6, 2007
Kenneth N. Harris Sr., a two-term city councilman, begins today airing his first television commercial of this year's City Council president race. The 30-second spot will air on all four local network affiliates and will run through election day Tuesday. This is the fourth television ad of this year's four-way Democratic primary for City Council president. What the ad says: The commercial opens with a shot of City Hall and upbeat music. "The Sun says Kenneth N. Harris Sr. `is a City Council member with an independent streak, and he displays an admirable passion and energy,'" a female narrator says, as the ad shows a picture of the council president endorsement editorial published Sunday by The Sun. Harris is shown walking in front of City Hall, and a photo of Harris with his wife and children is also displayed.
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