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NEWS
August 22, 2003
On August 19, 2003, HERBERT beloved husband of Alice Kempner (nee Daly-Lindeman) devoted father of Jane Daniels and her husband John "Jack" Daniels and Russell Samuel Kempner, loving grandfather of John "Jack" Daniels, Michael Daniels and Jessica Lynn Daniels, dear uncle of William Kempner, Donna Kempner-Kong of San Francisco, CA, and great-uncle of David Walter Kempner and Marie and Carlos Kong. A Memorial Service will be held at St. Peters Episcopal Church, 3695 Rogers Avenue, Ellicott City, MD, on Friday at 11:30 A.M. Arrangements by Witzke Funeral Home of Catonsville Inc.
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FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | June 18, 2007
I watched the Rev. Al Sharpton last week doing lots of TV grandstanding at being America's conscience, just as he tried to be in the matter of Don Imus. I want to say, he's not my choice for this role. I'll listen to this big self-important windbag when he apologizes for helping Tawana Brawley put over her farce kidnap attack many years ago. (Sharpton has yet to admit he did anything wrong in backing a total liar and conniver while he pursued his own agenda.) So this most recent outing was in connection with Paris Hilton, who finally came to the senses we didn't even know she had. She did her mea culpa with Barbara Walters.
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NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Herbert B. Kempner, a former electrical supply company owner and semipro baseball outfielder who once batted against Satchel Paige, died of heart disease Tuesday at St. Agnes HealthCare. The Catonsville resident was 84. Mr. Kempner was born in Hartford, Conn., and raised in New York from about age 10, when his family moved to the Bronx. His father died of pneumonia when Mr. Kempner was 13, and he became the primary breadwinner for his family. He held a series of jobs, including supply clerk at Macy's, where he was issued a pair of roller skates as part of his uniform.
NEWS
August 22, 2003
On August 19, 2003, HERBERT beloved husband of Alice Kempner (nee Daly-Lindeman) devoted father of Jane Daniels and her husband John "Jack" Daniels and Russell Samuel Kempner, loving grandfather of John "Jack" Daniels, Michael Daniels and Jessica Lynn Daniels, dear uncle of William Kempner, Donna Kempner-Kong of San Francisco, CA, and great-uncle of David Walter Kempner and Marie and Carlos Kong. A Memorial Service will be held at St. Peters Episcopal Church, 3695 Rogers Avenue, Ellicott City, MD, on Friday at 11:30 A.M. Arrangements by Witzke Funeral Home of Catonsville Inc.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1998
Though he's 79, Herb Kempner never hesitated when he heard of a chance to go back to elementary school -- Lansdowne Elementary was seeking volunteers to read with children.Every Monday morning, he's hard at work in the school, telling stories and reviewing the alphabet with first-graders."It's my privilege to give something back to the community," said Kempner, who lives in Catonsville and retired last winter from electrical supply sales. "It's also a real pleasure to work with so many eager kids who really want to learn."
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 27, 1999
Aviva Kempner grew up in Detroit, where every Yom Kippur her father, a Jewish immigrant, would tell her the same story about how the legendary Detroit Tiger Hank Greenberg refused to play baseball on the Jewish Day of Atonement."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | August 26, 1999
Hank Greenberg was the first Jewish superstar in baseball when he played for the Detroit Tigers in the 1930s. In 1938 the Bronx-born Greenberg hit 58 home runs, just two shy of Babe Ruth's record. Washington, D.C., filmmaker Aviva Kempner, who grew up in Detroit and idolized Greenberg for his athleticism and his religious devotion (he received a Talmudic dispensation to play on Rosh Hashana but refused to play on Yom Kippur), has made "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg," a delightful documentary that's been on the festival circuit since its debut last year.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 4, 1996
Sounds like somebody's working the ole post-season parking scam in downtown Baltimore again. A couple of Orioles fans from Washington, Aviva Kempner and Eddie Cockrell, drove up for Wednesday's game against the Indians. Cockrell, who was driving and searching for a place to park, got waved into a private lot on Tyson Street between Park and Howard. He gave an "attendant" $10 and walked to the game.When Kempner and Cockrell returned to the lot after the game, their car was gone. The "attendant" was gone.
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,The Boston Globe | May 15, 1994
There are some interesting people you should get to know in the pages of the magazines this week.One is Iris Sawyer, the woman scorned in Roger D. Friedman's intriguing piece in the current New York magazine. Ms. Sawyer's classic New York (both the city and the magazine) story has everything. It's not only about that cliche, the Death of the '80s, it's also a cautionary tale about dabbling with wealthy, free-swinging hustlers. It's also about the Nouveau Poor, people like Ms. Sawyer, a woman who was worth $3.5 million five years ago and who is now virtually homeless.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | June 18, 2007
I watched the Rev. Al Sharpton last week doing lots of TV grandstanding at being America's conscience, just as he tried to be in the matter of Don Imus. I want to say, he's not my choice for this role. I'll listen to this big self-important windbag when he apologizes for helping Tawana Brawley put over her farce kidnap attack many years ago. (Sharpton has yet to admit he did anything wrong in backing a total liar and conniver while he pursued his own agenda.) So this most recent outing was in connection with Paris Hilton, who finally came to the senses we didn't even know she had. She did her mea culpa with Barbara Walters.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2003
Herbert B. Kempner, a former electrical supply company owner and semipro baseball outfielder who once batted against Satchel Paige, died of heart disease Tuesday at St. Agnes HealthCare. The Catonsville resident was 84. Mr. Kempner was born in Hartford, Conn., and raised in New York from about age 10, when his family moved to the Bronx. His father died of pneumonia when Mr. Kempner was 13, and he became the primary breadwinner for his family. He held a series of jobs, including supply clerk at Macy's, where he was issued a pair of roller skates as part of his uniform.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 21, 2000
I DON'T know about my Jews. Albert Einstein we gave to the world, and Sigmund Freud, too. From the great figures in literature and science and philosophy, we could fill entire ballparks. Nobel Prize winners, we got 'em by the score. But, scoring in major league baseball -- this, we can't seem to manage. Go figure. At the Charles Theatre this week, they are showing the heartwarming (and vexing) documentary, "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg." For those whose baseball history goes no deeper than Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, understand that Greenberg, more than 60 years ago, hit 58 home runs in a single season.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
He was "Hammerin' Hank," a 6-foot, 4-inch New Yorker who ran with all the grace of a train wreck and, on a swinging strike, looked about as bad as a ballplayer could look. But when he connected -- which was often -- the ball jumped off his bat with the force of a howitzer, often not stopping until it had cleared the outfield fence. Hank Greenberg was one heckuva ballplayer, a two-time American League MVP who led the Detroit Tigers to two World Series titles in the 1930s and 1940s. For several years, he and the Yankees' Lou Gehrig were the game's dominant first basemen -- and not everyone agreed who was better.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 27, 1999
Aviva Kempner grew up in Detroit, where every Yom Kippur her father, a Jewish immigrant, would tell her the same story about how the legendary Detroit Tiger Hank Greenberg refused to play baseball on the Jewish Day of Atonement."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday | August 26, 1999
Hank Greenberg was the first Jewish superstar in baseball when he played for the Detroit Tigers in the 1930s. In 1938 the Bronx-born Greenberg hit 58 home runs, just two shy of Babe Ruth's record. Washington, D.C., filmmaker Aviva Kempner, who grew up in Detroit and idolized Greenberg for his athleticism and his religious devotion (he received a Talmudic dispensation to play on Rosh Hashana but refused to play on Yom Kippur), has made "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg," a delightful documentary that's been on the festival circuit since its debut last year.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1998
Though he's 79, Herb Kempner never hesitated when he heard of a chance to go back to elementary school -- Lansdowne Elementary was seeking volunteers to read with children.Every Monday morning, he's hard at work in the school, telling stories and reviewing the alphabet with first-graders."It's my privilege to give something back to the community," said Kempner, who lives in Catonsville and retired last winter from electrical supply sales. "It's also a real pleasure to work with so many eager kids who really want to learn."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2000
He was "Hammerin' Hank," a 6-foot, 4-inch New Yorker who ran with all the grace of a train wreck and, on a swinging strike, looked about as bad as a ballplayer could look. But when he connected -- which was often -- the ball jumped off his bat with the force of a howitzer, often not stopping until it had cleared the outfield fence. Hank Greenberg was one heckuva ballplayer, a two-time American League MVP who led the Detroit Tigers to two World Series titles in the 1930s and 1940s. For several years, he and the Yankees' Lou Gehrig were the game's dominant first basemen -- and not everyone agreed who was better.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 21, 2000
I DON'T know about my Jews. Albert Einstein we gave to the world, and Sigmund Freud, too. From the great figures in literature and science and philosophy, we could fill entire ballparks. Nobel Prize winners, we got 'em by the score. But, scoring in major league baseball -- this, we can't seem to manage. Go figure. At the Charles Theatre this week, they are showing the heartwarming (and vexing) documentary, "The Life and Times of Hank Greenberg." For those whose baseball history goes no deeper than Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, understand that Greenberg, more than 60 years ago, hit 58 home runs in a single season.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 4, 1996
Sounds like somebody's working the ole post-season parking scam in downtown Baltimore again. A couple of Orioles fans from Washington, Aviva Kempner and Eddie Cockrell, drove up for Wednesday's game against the Indians. Cockrell, who was driving and searching for a place to park, got waved into a private lot on Tyson Street between Park and Howard. He gave an "attendant" $10 and walked to the game.When Kempner and Cockrell returned to the lot after the game, their car was gone. The "attendant" was gone.
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,The Boston Globe | May 15, 1994
There are some interesting people you should get to know in the pages of the magazines this week.One is Iris Sawyer, the woman scorned in Roger D. Friedman's intriguing piece in the current New York magazine. Ms. Sawyer's classic New York (both the city and the magazine) story has everything. It's not only about that cliche, the Death of the '80s, it's also a cautionary tale about dabbling with wealthy, free-swinging hustlers. It's also about the Nouveau Poor, people like Ms. Sawyer, a woman who was worth $3.5 million five years ago and who is now virtually homeless.
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