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By Paul Brownfield and Paul Brownfield,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 27, 2004
These days, the Ghost of Christmas Present is Chase Manhattan Bank, selling a credit card at the holidays. That's who called while I was watching A Christmas Carol, the latest incarnation of the Charles Dickens classic starring Kelsey Grammer as Ebenezer Scrooge and airing tomorrow night on NBC (WBAL, Channel 11). The Chase guy on the phone didn't hit any of the themes of A Christmas Carol, didn't ask if I had enough love in my life, though in fairness I didn't keep him long. OK, I hung up on him. A short time later, Grammer as Scrooge was being led by the Ghost of Christmas Past (Jane Krakowski, of Ally McBeal fame)
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
A decade after graduating from Baltimore's Gilman School, some alumni might be vaulting up the ladder in careers as executives or politicians. But Brian Sher, Class of '86, was looking at the lowest rung - starting out as a trainee in the mailroom of a Hollywood talent agency. After attending Tulane and the University of Southern California, Sher had tried doing most of the things young people do to break into show business: working as production assistant on a movie, playing a walk-on character and writing a screenplay.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 1, 1996
Without Kelsey Grammer aboard, "Down Periscope" would sink like a pig boat with the plug pulled.But in his first big screen starring role, the balding TV guy holds the screen with impressive aplomb and gives even this vagrant script an emotional anchor that almost makes it work.Grammer plays Cmdr. Tom Dodge, a brilliant but erratic career Naval officer who is on the brink of elimination from the elite command pool in the nuclear sub fleet. One old salt -- Adm. Rip Torn -- still believes in him, so he's given a command at last, though it's the wackiest boat in the Navy: a World War II rustbucket that has no nuclear plant aboard but only grunting diesels and electric motors.
NEWS
September 2, 2008
Carmen Amedori, 52, is a resident of Westminster and was a state delegate representing Carroll County from 1999 until 2004, when she was appointed to serve on the Maryland Parole Commission during the Ehrlich administration. A Baltimore native and a graduate of Villa Julie College (now Stevenson University), Amedori worked as a paralegal and journalist while raising two daughters before entering the world of politics. She was one of the few elected officials in Maryland who supported John McCain when he ran for president in 2000 and was an alternate delegate at that year's convention.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
A decade after graduating from Baltimore's Gilman School, some alumni might be vaulting up the ladder in careers as executives or politicians. But Brian Sher, Class of '86, was looking at the lowest rung - starting out as a trainee in the mailroom of a Hollywood talent agency. After attending Tulane and the University of Southern California, Sher had tried doing most of the things young people do to break into show business: working as production assistant on a movie, playing a walk-on character and writing a screenplay.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 9, 1994
"Saturday Night Live" has Kelsey Grammer on as guest host this week. So, now that I'm enumerated all the TV highlights for tonight, what else do you want to talk about?* "Blossom" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- To paraphrase James Taylor: "Blossom," send some sunshine down way, lately I've been bored. Tonight, cast members Joey Lawrence and Michael Stoyanov provide the voices of aliens from outer space, who have the capability to tune in and watch any household on Earth, and select the Russos.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | October 7, 1993
Baseball action continues on CBS -- but fans of other tempting offerings, such as "The Simpsons" and "Seinfeld" have some choosing to do. Or, at lease, some fast remote-control zapping.* "National League baseball playoffs" (8 p.m.-conclusion, WBAL, Channel 11) -- Game 2 of the NL play- offs, after which the Philadelphia Phillies give up home-field advantage and move on, with the Braves, to Atlanta. CBS.* "The Simpsons" (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Kelsey Grammer appears -- or, more accurately, his voice does -- on two different comedies tonight.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | November 28, 1998
Though not up to the best of Disney, 20th Century Fox's "Anastasia" (7 p.m.-9 p.m., HBO) is a frequently delightful animated take on the legend of Anastasia, the youngest daughter of Russia's last czar, Nicholas, and his wife, Alexandra. Meg Ryan, at her sauciest, is the voice of the young czarina, who escapes the violent fate of the rest of her family and ends up in an orphanage, with no memory of who she is. Some of the animation is quite stunning, particularly a dream sequence staged in the czar's former palace.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1997
Finally, here's proof an animated film doesn't have to be Disney to be good."Anastasia," the new feature-length animation from 20th Century Fox about a princess whose destiny finds her, is every bit as good as most of its Disney predecessors and better than many. Filled with sparkling animation and appealing characters, it's a film that should keep the kids happy and their parents entertained -- even as it leaves historians with their mouths agape.The story opens in the waning days of Czarist Russia, as young Anastasia (voiced by Kirsten Dunst)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
Don't you wish that, instead of airing tributes to TV stars of old, the networks would simply air an episode or two of the shows that made them so great? Tonight's offerings include a perfect example of superfluous television, an hour-long tribute to Jack Benny that's not one-tenth as funny as the best of his half-hour shows.* "Friends" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- A repeat of May's season-ender has Rachel finally discovering that Ross loves her -- only to have him find a new girlfriend before she tells him she feels the same way. Is it just me, or do the Friends all seem a lot older this year?
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 1, 2008
Kevin Costner can do certain kinds of American confusion better than anyone else. He's nonpareil at playing the mental fog that isn't quite a hangover, or the comfort a modest man can take in a homey, familiar mess. As Bud Johnson, the single father and sometime egg-factory worker in the mild political comedy-drama Swing Vote, he plays a middle-aged slacker so unsentimentally, and with such ease and conviction, that he supplies the movie with a comic engine that keeps running when the script wheezes and splutters.
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By Maria Elena Fernandez and Maria Elena Fernandez,Los Angeels Times | May 14, 2007
It's a touchdown for NBC's Friday Night Lights! The Texas drama - it's about much more than football - has been renewed for a full second season. No word yet on what night NBC will air a show that has struggled in the ratings (against stiff-armed competition) but quickly became one of the season's biggest critical darlings. Credit goes to NBC's president of entertainment, Kevin Reilly, a big fan of the show, for showing patience and letting the fans spend more time with coach Eric Taylor (Kyle Chandler)
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By Paul Brownfield and Paul Brownfield,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 27, 2004
These days, the Ghost of Christmas Present is Chase Manhattan Bank, selling a credit card at the holidays. That's who called while I was watching A Christmas Carol, the latest incarnation of the Charles Dickens classic starring Kelsey Grammer as Ebenezer Scrooge and airing tomorrow night on NBC (WBAL, Channel 11). The Chase guy on the phone didn't hit any of the themes of A Christmas Carol, didn't ask if I had enough love in my life, though in fairness I didn't keep him long. OK, I hung up on him. A short time later, Grammer as Scrooge was being led by the Ghost of Christmas Past (Jane Krakowski, of Ally McBeal fame)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 14, 2004
After 11 years, NBC's Frasier ended its acclaimed run last night with Dr. Frasier Crane (Kelsey Grammer) quoting Tennyson to his Seattle radio audience and then flying off to Chicago in pursuit of a woman named Charlotte (Laura Linney) whom he had met just three weeks ago. Along the way were a birth, a wedding, low farce and some of the most highly intelligent sitcom writing prime time network television is ever likely to see. Final episodes of long-running series are almost impossible to craft, and this one had its flaws.
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By Greg Baerg and Greg Baerg,ZAP2IT.COM | August 12, 2002
LOS ANGELES - When it comes to staying power in primetime television, there are few people who rival ER's Noah Wyle. The series enters its ninth season on NBC this September, and Wyle is now the only cast member to appear in all seasons of the show). Currently, only NYPD Blue's Dennis Franz and Frasier's Kelsey Grammer (thanks to his time on Cheers) have longer runs. The Friends cast equals Wyle since the show premiered the same season. Now, as he begins filming what he says will be his second-to-last season on ER, Wyle feels extremely comfortable - as an actor and as his character, Dr. John Carter.
NEWS
By DAVE BARRY | March 17, 2002
OF ALL THE PRESTIGIOUS awards that the entertainment industry gives to itself in humble recognition of its own sheer fabulousness - the Emmys, the Grammys, the Tonys, the Golden Globes, The Wallys, The Silver Spheres, The Vinnys, the Cubic Zirconium Orbs of Distinction, the Sneezys and the Award That They Always Give To Kelsey Grammer - there is none so prestigious as the Oscars. That's why an estimated 40 billion people will tune in this year to watch the Academy Awards show, which begins at 5:30 p.m. (Pacific)
NEWS
September 2, 2008
Carmen Amedori, 52, is a resident of Westminster and was a state delegate representing Carroll County from 1999 until 2004, when she was appointed to serve on the Maryland Parole Commission during the Ehrlich administration. A Baltimore native and a graduate of Villa Julie College (now Stevenson University), Amedori worked as a paralegal and journalist while raising two daughters before entering the world of politics. She was one of the few elected officials in Maryland who supported John McCain when he ran for president in 2000 and was an alternate delegate at that year's convention.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | January 3, 1995
Yesterday, we had the first new TV series of 1995. Tonight we have the year's third new telemovie (the networks unveiled the first two Sunday), as well as new episodes of "Frasier" and "NYPD Blue."* "Wings" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 11) -- For some reason, perhaps that of its affable leads, this series manages to get renewed, even though what it brings to the table is somewhat meager. Tonight, though, should be worth a look: Valerie Mahaffey of "The Powers That Be" is a guest star, for the second time, as a somewhat unstable woman with a crush on Joe (Tim Daly)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | November 28, 1998
Though not up to the best of Disney, 20th Century Fox's "Anastasia" (7 p.m.-9 p.m., HBO) is a frequently delightful animated take on the legend of Anastasia, the youngest daughter of Russia's last czar, Nicholas, and his wife, Alexandra. Meg Ryan, at her sauciest, is the voice of the young czarina, who escapes the violent fate of the rest of her family and ends up in an orphanage, with no memory of who she is. Some of the animation is quite stunning, particularly a dream sequence staged in the czar's former palace.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1997
Finally, here's proof an animated film doesn't have to be Disney to be good."Anastasia," the new feature-length animation from 20th Century Fox about a princess whose destiny finds her, is every bit as good as most of its Disney predecessors and better than many. Filled with sparkling animation and appealing characters, it's a film that should keep the kids happy and their parents entertained -- even as it leaves historians with their mouths agape.The story opens in the waning days of Czarist Russia, as young Anastasia (voiced by Kirsten Dunst)
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