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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | April 21, 2008
OH, I LOVE film. D.W. Griffith, Hitchcock, William Wellman. I know my movies. I mean, should I go on?" That is the weather-beaten cineaste, Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones, talking to Entertainment Weekly. Who'd a thunk it? Well, here's another unusual celebrity guest for Turner Classic Movies guy Robert Osborne to persuade to sit down with him. Wouldn't you love to see the vintage guitarist and the urbane Mr. O. chatting about -- say, Kim Novak in Vertigo? Some days, I think there's nothing left to anticipate in show business, but then I hear something like the above; I can go on. Scholarly competition Microsoft titan Bill Gates gave England's Cambridge University $210 million to set up a scholarship that will rival Oxford's trusty old Rhodes, except Gates wants to identify and nurture networking-friendly global citizens who want to save the world.
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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
At first, it sounds as if the band is just tuning up. Mick Jagger honks out a call on his harmonica. Guitarist Mick Taylor responds with a blues run. Ron Wood twiddles between a couple of notes. Then Keith Richards lands the haymaker opening chords to “Midnight Rambler,” Charlie Watts crashes his way in on cymbals and drums and the long-running locomotive that is the Rolling Stones roars to full, satisfying life, careening down the rails, popping rivets, threatening to jump the tracks.
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By J.D. Considine | December 2, 1999
Over the past 30 years, NRBQ has gone from being the New Rhythm & Blues Quintet to a quirky, roots-rocking quartet, shedding two guitarists, a singer and a horn section along the way. The group has never had much luck on the charts -- 1974's "Get That Gasoline Blues" was the closest NRBQ has gotten to having a hit, and that only made it to No. 70 -- yet it counts such luminaries among its fans as Paul McCartney, R.E.M.. Bonnie Raitt and Keith Richards. Heck, bassist Joey Spampinato was in the running to replace Bill Wyman in the Rolling Stones.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Every one of the Rolling Stones' 50 years has etched a line into Keith Richards' face, making it certainly one of the most battle-scarred visages in rock -- which makes it oh-so-incredibly cool when he breaks into that scraggly smile, the one that says, "I've survived, and I've prospered. Howzaboutyou?" Tuesday night at Philadelphia's Wells Fargo Center, the Stones' 50 & Counting tour rolled into the City of Brotherly Love for a party that celebrated all sorts of things: survival, perseverance, genius and glory undimmed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 6, 1992
HARVEST MOONNeil Young (Reprise 45057)Although the title and timing seem to suggest that "Harvest Moon" is Neil Young's attempt to recapture the 20-year-old magic of the enduringly popular "Harvest," its sound argues that this new album is actually more of an update than a remake. Gone are the occasional flashes of orchestral grandeur -- the one aspect of the original that now seems hokey -- and Young plays down the stoner despair of songs like "Old Man" or "The Needle and the Damage Done" in favor of the laid-back lassitude of country rockers like "From Hank to Hendrix" and "Natural Beauty."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 16, 1999
Sheryl CrowSheryl Crow and Friends: Live From Central Park (A&M 069490574)A lot of people have the wrong idea about Sheryl Crow.Because she came in on the same wave that Sarah McLachlan, Natalie Merchant and Lilith Fair alumnae rode to prominence, critics and listeners quickly lumped her in with the other female singer/songwriters. Nor was that an unreasonable reaction, considering that Crow was, in fact, a woman who wrote and sang her own songs.But as "Sheryl Crow and Friends: Live From Central Park" demonstrates, Crow is also a first-rate rocker.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 24, 2002
RECENTLY I ATTENDED a Rolling Stones concert. This is something I do every two decades. I saw the Stones in the 1960s, and again in the 1980s. I plan to see them next in the 2020s, then the 2040s, and then the 2060s, at their 100th anniversary concert. By then, of course, I will be a very old man with no working organs. But I'm sure medical science will figure out a way to get me to a Stones concert. Maybe I'll be just a head, with no body, kept alive in a Plexiglas container carried around by an attendant.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 16, 2005
LADIES AND gentlemen ... the greatest geriatric rock 'n' roll band in the world, the Rolling Stones! C'mon, is this a terrific story or what? The Stones are launching another world tour? How old are these guys now? Let's see, Mick Jagger is 61. Charlie Watts is 63. Ron Wood is 58, which practically qualifies him for the kids' menu with this bunch. And of course poor Keith Richards is dead, having passed away some years ago while ... what's that? You say Keith Richards is still alive?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Every one of the Rolling Stones' 50 years has etched a line into Keith Richards' face, making it certainly one of the most battle-scarred visages in rock -- which makes it oh-so-incredibly cool when he breaks into that scraggly smile, the one that says, "I've survived, and I've prospered. Howzaboutyou?" Tuesday night at Philadelphia's Wells Fargo Center, the Stones' 50 & Counting tour rolled into the City of Brotherly Love for a party that celebrated all sorts of things: survival, perseverance, genius and glory undimmed.
NEWS
By Victor Paul Victor | October 4, 1993
RYTHM OIL. By Stanley Booth. Vintage. 254 pages. $12.THE hellhounds finally caught up to Robert Johnson when he died of poisoning at age 26.He would be known as the greatest bluesman ever to put shaved glass on the strings. He is, as Stanley Booth puts it in his book "Rythm Oil," "the embodiment of the Faustian legend."Mr. Booth begins his wonderful little book of allegedly true stories with a fictionalized account of Johnson saying to the devil: "Teach me, I been lookin' for you all my life."
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | April 21, 2008
OH, I LOVE film. D.W. Griffith, Hitchcock, William Wellman. I know my movies. I mean, should I go on?" That is the weather-beaten cineaste, Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones, talking to Entertainment Weekly. Who'd a thunk it? Well, here's another unusual celebrity guest for Turner Classic Movies guy Robert Osborne to persuade to sit down with him. Wouldn't you love to see the vintage guitarist and the urbane Mr. O. chatting about -- say, Kim Novak in Vertigo? Some days, I think there's nothing left to anticipate in show business, but then I hear something like the above; I can go on. Scholarly competition Microsoft titan Bill Gates gave England's Cambridge University $210 million to set up a scholarship that will rival Oxford's trusty old Rhodes, except Gates wants to identify and nurture networking-friendly global citizens who want to save the world.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 16, 2005
LADIES AND gentlemen ... the greatest geriatric rock 'n' roll band in the world, the Rolling Stones! C'mon, is this a terrific story or what? The Stones are launching another world tour? How old are these guys now? Let's see, Mick Jagger is 61. Charlie Watts is 63. Ron Wood is 58, which practically qualifies him for the kids' menu with this bunch. And of course poor Keith Richards is dead, having passed away some years ago while ... what's that? You say Keith Richards is still alive?
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | November 24, 2002
RECENTLY I ATTENDED a Rolling Stones concert. This is something I do every two decades. I saw the Stones in the 1960s, and again in the 1980s. I plan to see them next in the 2020s, then the 2040s, and then the 2060s, at their 100th anniversary concert. By then, of course, I will be a very old man with no working organs. But I'm sure medical science will figure out a way to get me to a Stones concert. Maybe I'll be just a head, with no body, kept alive in a Plexiglas container carried around by an attendant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 16, 1999
Sheryl CrowSheryl Crow and Friends: Live From Central Park (A&M 069490574)A lot of people have the wrong idea about Sheryl Crow.Because she came in on the same wave that Sarah McLachlan, Natalie Merchant and Lilith Fair alumnae rode to prominence, critics and listeners quickly lumped her in with the other female singer/songwriters. Nor was that an unreasonable reaction, considering that Crow was, in fact, a woman who wrote and sang her own songs.But as "Sheryl Crow and Friends: Live From Central Park" demonstrates, Crow is also a first-rate rocker.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | December 2, 1999
Over the past 30 years, NRBQ has gone from being the New Rhythm & Blues Quintet to a quirky, roots-rocking quartet, shedding two guitarists, a singer and a horn section along the way. The group has never had much luck on the charts -- 1974's "Get That Gasoline Blues" was the closest NRBQ has gotten to having a hit, and that only made it to No. 70 -- yet it counts such luminaries among its fans as Paul McCartney, R.E.M.. Bonnie Raitt and Keith Richards. Heck, bassist Joey Spampinato was in the running to replace Bill Wyman in the Rolling Stones.
NEWS
By GARY GATELY | August 7, 1994
Somewhere between Niagara Falls and Toronto, we heard the tantalizing news on the car radio: "The Rolling Stones are gearing up for a club show in the city tonight."Then, an instant later, the reality check left us shattered: It's too late, the Toronto DJ said, eight hours before the surprise show. The club's a mob scene, and the chosen ones have been chosen, corralled in a fenced-off area until the doors open. Don't even bother, you'll never get in.My wife looked at me, shuddering at the prospect of spending a precious vacation day trying in vain to get in. She frowned and shook her head.
NEWS
By GARY GATELY | August 7, 1994
Somewhere between Niagara Falls and Toronto, we heard the tantalizing news on the car radio: "The Rolling Stones are gearing up for a club show in the city tonight."Then, an instant later, the reality check left us shattered: It's too late, the Toronto DJ said, eight hours before the surprise show. The club's a mob scene, and the chosen ones have been chosen, corralled in a fenced-off area until the doors open. Don't even bother, you'll never get in.My wife looked at me, shuddering at the prospect of spending a precious vacation day trying in vain to get in. She frowned and shook her head.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
At first, it sounds as if the band is just tuning up. Mick Jagger honks out a call on his harmonica. Guitarist Mick Taylor responds with a blues run. Ron Wood twiddles between a couple of notes. Then Keith Richards lands the haymaker opening chords to “Midnight Rambler,” Charlie Watts crashes his way in on cymbals and drums and the long-running locomotive that is the Rolling Stones roars to full, satisfying life, careening down the rails, popping rivets, threatening to jump the tracks.
NEWS
By Victor Paul Victor | October 4, 1993
RYTHM OIL. By Stanley Booth. Vintage. 254 pages. $12.THE hellhounds finally caught up to Robert Johnson when he died of poisoning at age 26.He would be known as the greatest bluesman ever to put shaved glass on the strings. He is, as Stanley Booth puts it in his book "Rythm Oil," "the embodiment of the Faustian legend."Mr. Booth begins his wonderful little book of allegedly true stories with a fictionalized account of Johnson saying to the devil: "Teach me, I been lookin' for you all my life."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | November 6, 1992
HARVEST MOONNeil Young (Reprise 45057)Although the title and timing seem to suggest that "Harvest Moon" is Neil Young's attempt to recapture the 20-year-old magic of the enduringly popular "Harvest," its sound argues that this new album is actually more of an update than a remake. Gone are the occasional flashes of orchestral grandeur -- the one aspect of the original that now seems hokey -- and Young plays down the stoner despair of songs like "Old Man" or "The Needle and the Damage Done" in favor of the laid-back lassitude of country rockers like "From Hank to Hendrix" and "Natural Beauty."
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