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By Garrison Keillor | February 17, 2010
If you wake up in the morning with the blues because people treat you mean, you could sing a song about it, or you could shop around for an enormous conspiracy that has denied you your constitutional right to liberty and happiness -- and how about Central Standard Time? What gives the feds the right to set your clock for you? It's tyranny. So you join the Free Time movement. You go to meetings. You tune in "The Bob Glenn Show" every day on Fox for your marching orders and set your clock as you darn well please and feel liberated from lockstep uniformity.
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NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | February 17, 2010
If you wake up in the morning with the blues because people treat you mean, you could sing a song about it, or you could shop around for an enormous conspiracy that has denied you your constitutional right to liberty and happiness -- and how about Central Standard Time? What gives the feds the right to set your clock for you? It's tyranny. So you join the Free Time movement. You go to meetings. You tune in "The Bob Glenn Show" every day on Fox for your marching orders and set your clock as you darn well please and feel liberated from lockstep uniformity.
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FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 15, 2007
A historic meeting was held over the weekend between H.L. Mencken and Guy Noir, marred only slightly by the fact that one of them is dead and the other is fictional. But if any two people should meet, it is Mencken, the dour journalist and humorist, and Garrison Keillor, the dour contemporary author and humorist. The latter sought to correct this historic deficiency Saturday when he brought his radio show, A Prairie Home Companion, to the Hippodrome Theatre. Keillor's alter ego is a recurring character named Guy Noir, Private Eye. As Keillor envisioned it, Guy is in Baltimore on a job when he meets a lovely Salvation Army lass while she is reforming sinners on The Block.
NEWS
December 24, 2009
Mr: Keillor: Count me in your "amen" corner. Briefly, my background was Orthodox Judaism, then agnosticism, and on March 31, 2002, I was baptized at St. James Episcopal Church of Leesburg, Va., at the Great Easter Vigil. Like most people who associate with some faith, I'm struggling. Most people who have my last name are Orthodox Jews, and your words "And all those lousy holiday songs by Jewish guys" hit the mark. It raised the ire of my cousin, who became quite visceral. He is a lovable mensch who isn't that religious, but like others who aren't strong in their faith, circled the wagon on this.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and By Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 23, 2002
VIENNA, Va. -- The voice like drowsy thunder reassures us that everything is under control. Garrison Keillor proceeds from syllable to deliberate syllable with the unhurried cadence of a rocking chair, back and forth, back and forth ... Just the sound of that voice conjures up quiet images: a sweating glass of lemonade, a moth flattened against a window screen. The resulting state of dreamy contemplation is what the roughly 3 million fans of A Prairie Home Companion tune in for on their radios each weekend.
NEWS
By D.J. Tice | February 10, 1999
IT SEEMS somebody let on to Minnesota Gov. Jesse "The Body" Ventura that another local personality, Garrison Keillor, is writing a book about him, a satire about a professional wrestler named Jimmy "Big Boy" Valente who gets himself elected governor.Mr. Ventura thinks Mr. Keillor is "cheating," rather like various cartoonists, moviemakers and merchandisers the governor has bad-mouthed for "making money off of me." Mr. Ventura is also, um, writing a book about himself. He probably figures there's some remote chance that Mr. Keillor's book will be better.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 11, 1993
Like most dads, I want my kids to grow up knowing life's important stuff. How to pound a nail, how to shoot a hook shot and how to tell a good story.Stories keep family myths alive, especially those dealing with successfully completed home repairs and made hook shots. So a few weeks ago I took my 12-year-old son down to the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall to listen to Garrison Keillor. Keillor is an author, host of a two-hour live radio show, "A Prairie Home Companion" -- heard Saturday nights on more than 265 public radio stations -- and a terrific teller of tales.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | September 9, 2007
Pontoon A Novel of Lake Wobegon By Garrison Keillor Viking/Penguin / 305 pages / $25.95 Not everyone finds Garrison Keillor and his Lake Wobegon series to be their cup of tea and Powdermilk Biscuits. But for those of us who grew up with the NPR radio serial A Prairie Home Companion, Lake Wobegon is a world apart - and much beloved. Keillor has been spinning his yarns in his breathy-yet-sonorous voice for over 30 years on Saturday evenings on NPR. I still have my Powdermilk Biscuits T-shirt from college and recall sitting with my mother, a big fan of Lake Wobegon, and listening to an episode here and there when I visited.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 26, 2007
Garrison Keillor says he's being stalked by a woman who sent him a petrified alligator's foot and dead beetles. Naturally, there's a Charm City angle. When Keillor played the Hippodrome earlier this month, his allegedly overzealous fan came to town, too - all the way from her home in Hawkinsville, Ga. Keillor claims that a woman named Andrea Campbell has shown up at his Minnesota home and sent him strange gifts and e-mails, including one that "graphically described making love to me," The St. Paul Pioneer Press reported this week.
NEWS
By Lawrence Freeny | December 20, 1993
THE BOOK OF GUYS. By Garrison Keillor. Viking. 340 pages. $22.ATTENTION, men who are baffled in perceiving just what women in the 1990s regard as acceptable male-to-female conduct: "The Book of Guys" looks in a fun-house mirror and sees much wit and even some male self-recognition.CGarrison Keillor's 21 short stories will offer women few if any new clues to the male psyche. And that should cheer men who've always found that women's knowledge of them is uncannily accurate, with or without Cosmopolitan or Redbook.
NEWS
May 9, 2009
Canton should stop saying no It seems Canton wants to keep the rest of the city out ("Rethink flawed Red Line proposal," May 5). They don't want to have an arena, and they don't want a light rail line that would connect them to the city and a Social Secuirity Complex on the other side of town. It seems they want a gated community with their own kind of people. They should find a place of their choice that already exists instead of trying to create one. Albert J. Novak II, Baltimore Jobless?
NEWS
May 30, 2008
Addition to school won't cure crowding The Sun may think that a 400-seat addition to Loch Raven High School is a "reasonable" solution to school crowding in Baltimore County ("Loch Raven school flap," editorial, May 28). But the facts don't support that conclusion. More than five years ago, a report by the DeJong panel recommended that a high school be built in Northeastern Baltimore County. White Marsh is one of the county's growth areas, but unlike the Owings Mills area, it did not get a new school to accommodate that growth.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 26, 2007
Garrison Keillor says he's being stalked by a woman who sent him a petrified alligator's foot and dead beetles. Naturally, there's a Charm City angle. When Keillor played the Hippodrome earlier this month, his allegedly overzealous fan came to town, too - all the way from her home in Hawkinsville, Ga. Keillor claims that a woman named Andrea Campbell has shown up at his Minnesota home and sent him strange gifts and e-mails, including one that "graphically described making love to me," The St. Paul Pioneer Press reported this week.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 15, 2007
A historic meeting was held over the weekend between H.L. Mencken and Guy Noir, marred only slightly by the fact that one of them is dead and the other is fictional. But if any two people should meet, it is Mencken, the dour journalist and humorist, and Garrison Keillor, the dour contemporary author and humorist. The latter sought to correct this historic deficiency Saturday when he brought his radio show, A Prairie Home Companion, to the Hippodrome Theatre. Keillor's alter ego is a recurring character named Guy Noir, Private Eye. As Keillor envisioned it, Guy is in Baltimore on a job when he meets a lovely Salvation Army lass while she is reforming sinners on The Block.
NEWS
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,[Special to The Sun] | September 9, 2007
Pontoon A Novel of Lake Wobegon By Garrison Keillor Viking/Penguin / 305 pages / $25.95 Not everyone finds Garrison Keillor and his Lake Wobegon series to be their cup of tea and Powdermilk Biscuits. But for those of us who grew up with the NPR radio serial A Prairie Home Companion, Lake Wobegon is a world apart - and much beloved. Keillor has been spinning his yarns in his breathy-yet-sonorous voice for over 30 years on Saturday evenings on NPR. I still have my Powdermilk Biscuits T-shirt from college and recall sitting with my mother, a big fan of Lake Wobegon, and listening to an episode here and there when I visited.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun reporter | November 30, 2006
The University of Maryland School of Medicine unveiled plans yesterday for a splashy, yearlong celebration to mark the institution's bicentennial. The school, founded in 1807, is the oldest public medical school in the country. Highlights of the anniversary celebration, which are scheduled to kick off in January, include: A series of free public lectures at the Hippodrome Theatre with singer Patti LaBelle, former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, and retired Oriole Cal Ripken. A live radio broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor.
NEWS
May 9, 2009
Canton should stop saying no It seems Canton wants to keep the rest of the city out ("Rethink flawed Red Line proposal," May 5). They don't want to have an arena, and they don't want a light rail line that would connect them to the city and a Social Secuirity Complex on the other side of town. It seems they want a gated community with their own kind of people. They should find a place of their choice that already exists instead of trying to create one. Albert J. Novak II, Baltimore Jobless?
FEATURES
September 4, 2001
Anne Heches marries Laffoon Saturday Actress Anne Heche, 32, married cameraman Coleman Laffoon, 27, on Saturday during a ceremony held at a villa near downtown Los Angeles, according to the Associated Press. The couple met while Heche was making a documentary about then-girlfriend Ellen DeGeneres' return to stand-up comedy, following the cancellation of her ABC sitcom Ellen. Heche and DeGeneres parted ways in August of last year, after having been together for three years. Hope remains in hospital Comedian Bob Hope will remain in the hospital for at least a few more days as he fights to recover from pneumonia, his physician said yesteraday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF COLUMNIST | August 3, 2003
Love Me, by Garrison Keillor. Viking. 272 pages. $24.95. Larry Wyler, the protagonist of Garrison Keillor's funny, bittersweet new novel, is a struggling writer who's bored to death with life in Minnesota and frustrated with his sensible, do-gooder wife - although he certainly seems to be handling it well. Here, for instance, is his gracious reaction when a friend announces that he's just sold his new book to Random House. "I wanted to choke him. I wanted to give him a swift kick where the sun don't shine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and By Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 23, 2002
VIENNA, Va. -- The voice like drowsy thunder reassures us that everything is under control. Garrison Keillor proceeds from syllable to deliberate syllable with the unhurried cadence of a rocking chair, back and forth, back and forth ... Just the sound of that voice conjures up quiet images: a sweating glass of lemonade, a moth flattened against a window screen. The resulting state of dreamy contemplation is what the roughly 3 million fans of A Prairie Home Companion tune in for on their radios each weekend.
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