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NEWS
July 20, 2003
On Saturday, July 19, 2003, LUCILLE K. KEIFFER, age 80; beloved wife of Art Keiffer, of 57 years; son Artimus Keiffer, of Springfield, OH; sisters Seda Evans and Margie Dingelman, both of Baltimore. Also survived by nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death by three infant daughters, her parents, four brothers and four sisters. Funeral Services or Calling Hours will not be observed as Cremation has taken place. Donations may be made to The American Cancer Society. Arrangements by Sheridan Funeral Home.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Ending weeks of speculation, state Del. Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. said Monday he will not seek to replace City Councilman William H. Cole IV, who is leaving the council to run Baltimore's economic development corporation.  "As a former member of the City Council who represented the 11th district, I was asked by my former colleagues and community leaders to seek the appointment to the seat," Mitchell said in a statement. "After much thought, prayer, and deliberation with family and friends, I have decided not to seek a return to the City Council.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
A 35-year-old Baltimore man, convicted last month of molesting the 9-year-old daughter of a former employer, was sentenced yesterday in Harford Circuit Court to 15 years in prison.Eugene Keiffer Jr., of the first block of South Washington Street, had five years of his sentence suspended by Judge Stephen M. Waldron. Keiffer must serve five years of supervised parole and probation upon completing the term.Judge Waldron also ordered Keiffer to pay $675 for court and legal fees and to undergo any treatment recommended for sexual offenders as well as drug and alcohol abusers.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Del. Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. and his 11-year-old son, Jack, representing the third and fourth generations of a storied political family, are knocking on doors near Mount St. Joseph school in Southwest Baltimore. A few blocks away, Del. Keith E. Haynes, the deputy majority whip of the House of Delegates, has an entourage of a dozen people clad in Baltimore black and yellow as he waves to passing motorists in the Irvington business district. And Del. Melvin L. Stukes, who has 20 years of experience in elected office, is working the area's churches, week in and week out. It's the smallest, and one of the poorest, legislative districts in Baltimore, but 44A is perhaps the most fiercely contested.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | January 9, 1994
A 35-year-old Baltimore man has been convicted of molesting the 9-year-old daughter of a former employer.Eugene Keiffer Jr., of the first block of South Washington St., stood without emotion as the jury forewoman announced the decision in Harford Circuit Court late Wednesday.The jury of six men and six women had deliberated about five hours after the two-day trial before returning guilty verdicts on charges of sexual child abuse, assault and battery and a third-degree sexual offense.Judge Stephen M. Waldron revoked Keiffer's $2,500 bond and ordered a pre-sentence investigation.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,sun reporter | March 20, 2007
In an early campaign gaffe that initially rankled some political insiders and fundraisers, City Councilman and Baltimore mayoral candidate Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. distributed a list of financial supporters that included people who are undecided or who support his opponent in this year's election. Mitchell, a three-term City Council member who officially announced his candidacy in January - and who appears to be Mayor Sheila Dixon's leading opponent - said the e-mail, which included several members of Dixon's transition committee, was a mistake.
NEWS
By John Fritze | July 27, 2007
Baltimore City Councilman and mayoral candidate Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. airs the second television commercial of this year's mayoral race today, focusing on two issues: Crime and his family background. The 30-second spot, according to the campaign, is the "first in a series." What the ad says: As a dizzying array of black-and-white pictures of crime scenes appear, Mitchell - in his own voice - says, "Today, we're facing a murder crisis in Baltimore. I'm Keiffer Mitchell. I will change things."
NEWS
By Sun Staff Report | July 21, 1995
In another sign of the divided sentiments over Baltimore's mayoral race, the largest coalition of area unions failed last night to endorse Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke or his challenger, Council President Mary Pat Clarke.Instead, the Metropolitan Baltimore Council AFL-CIO, an umbrella group of 160,000 union members, made "no recommendation." Delegates at the closed-door meeting followed the recommendation of the group's executive board, which met earlier yesterday to decide who would have labor's support in the Sept.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Kate Shatzkin contributed to this article | January 28, 1997
With prayer and a reading of the names of the people killed already this year, the Baltimore City Council paused last night to reflect and find ways to stop the bloodshed.The council proposed several strategies, from additional court fines to a task force on youth and alcohol, in an attempt to rescue the city from the ever-tightening grip of crime.But the most ambitious plan by a councilman to hire additional police officers and expand the state's attorney's office never got off the ground.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | July 12, 2007
Baltimore City mayoral candidate Andrey Bundley said yesterday that he's got a plan "to lead us out of this chaos." Speaking to the media in front of City Hall, Bundley, a school system administrator, said Baltimore desperately needs leadership that he can provide. "We can't afford to keep electing people with disconnected ideas," he said. "I've got a roadmap to lead us out of this chaos." Bundley, 46, is joined in the race for Baltimore's top elected job by Mayor Sheila Dixon, City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr., Del. Jill P. Carter, Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway Sr., A. Robert Kaufman, Mike Schaefer and Philip A. Brown Jr. The former high school principal ran unsuccessfully in the Democratic primary for mayor against Martin O'Malley in 2003.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2011
A state legislator is proposing to abolish the current structure of the Baltimore school system and return its reins to the mayor under legislation due to come before the Maryland General Assembly in January. The bill, pre-filed last week by Del. Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. of the city's 44th District, would designate the mayor as the chief decision-maker of the school system, which would be operated under a mayor-appointed superintendent and the superintendent's Cabinet. The school board's responsibilities would shift from a governing body to an advisory role.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | June 8, 2011
The Young Elected Officials Network had its national conference in Washington last week, and Del. Keiffer Mitchell, in D.C. on other business, decided to stop by. "I went to try to register at the table and they said the age limit is 35 years old," said Mitchell, who turns 44 in September. "I tried to explain to the lady, 'Hey, I’ve been going to the gym on a daily basis.'" They did let Mitchell in, as sort of an elderly observer. While there, he ran into Sen. Bill Ferguson and City Councilman Bill Cole.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2011
As Maryland lawmakers debated the gay marriage bill, and Del. Luke Clippinger came out to colleagues on the House floor, one of his fellow Baltimore Democrats was moved to tears. "My colleague Luke, I sit right next to him, enduring all these weeks of negativity, for him to finally speak out and say why he's in favor of it, what it means to him, it just got emotional," Del. Keiffer Mitchell told me. There's another reason the gay marriage debate hit home for Mitchell. His own marriage would have been illegal until 1967, the year he was born, because Mitchell is black and his wife is white.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | September 7, 2007
He stood on a West Baltimore corner, a hulking man looming over a black podium on a corner that like so many in this city was the site of a recent homicide. There was no raucous applause, no flurry of "Mitchell for Mayor" signs, no clutch of supporters circling City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. as he hammered away at crime, the cornerstone of his campaign. "Enough is enough," the mayoral contender boomed into the microphone. The television cameras zoomed in on Mitchell. Alone. By all accounts, Mitchell, a three-term councilman, has run an aggressive campaign in his bid to become the city's 49th mayor.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | August 20, 2007
Taking his most negative approach yet in this year's mayoral election, City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. launched a new television advertisement yesterday that blamed the city's high homicide count on Mayor Sheila Dixon's budget priorities. Mitchell's campaign also confirmed that it has authorized a recorded telephone call to about 30,000 city voters that deals with the mayor's decision to employ her sister, Janice Dixon, on her campaign. In the past, the mayor has been criticized for hiring and steering city contracts to her sister.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | July 30, 2007
Baltimore City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr., who has been focusing on addressing violence in his mayoral campaign, held a small news conference yesterday to call for the establishment of gang crime enforcement units in every police district. "We need officers out on streets in communities and in neighborhoods, finding out what's going on with gangs," Mitchell said, standing outside the Eastern District station, "because the gang problem is spreading through our city." Mitchell complained that only the Eastern District has its own anti-gang unit, and it was created by officers and the major there, not by command staff or City Hall.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,Sun reporter | January 27, 2007
Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr.'s decision to run for Baltimore mayor has cost him his day job at Harbor Bank, a development the city councilman blames on "Nixonesque politics." "I was told that my colleagues in politics had concerns about me working at Harbor Bank and that's all I can say," said Mitchell, who will begin an unpaid leave of absence Tuesday. "It's a shame that Mr. [Joseph] Haskins" - the bank's chief executive - "and the bank have been subjected to what I term as Nixonesque politics."
NEWS
By From staff reports | July 8, 2003
IN BALTIMORE CITY Mayor, councilman endorse each other's bids for re-election Mayor Martin O'Malley and City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. endorsed each other's re-election yesterday, praising each other for a commitment to diversity and equality. During a news conference at Charles and Eager streets in Mount Vernon, O'Malley held Mitchell's 1-year-old son, Jack, while standing beside the councilman's wife, Nicole. "I believe Keiffer Mitchell has been one of the most committed, hard-working council members we've had in several years," O'Malley said.
NEWS
By John Fritze | July 27, 2007
Baltimore City Councilman and mayoral candidate Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. airs the second television commercial of this year's mayoral race today, focusing on two issues: Crime and his family background. The 30-second spot, according to the campaign, is the "first in a series." What the ad says: As a dizzying array of black-and-white pictures of crime scenes appear, Mitchell - in his own voice - says, "Today, we're facing a murder crisis in Baltimore. I'm Keiffer Mitchell. I will change things."
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | July 12, 2007
Baltimore City mayoral candidate Andrey Bundley said yesterday that he's got a plan "to lead us out of this chaos." Speaking to the media in front of City Hall, Bundley, a school system administrator, said Baltimore desperately needs leadership that he can provide. "We can't afford to keep electing people with disconnected ideas," he said. "I've got a roadmap to lead us out of this chaos." Bundley, 46, is joined in the race for Baltimore's top elected job by Mayor Sheila Dixon, City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr., Del. Jill P. Carter, Circuit Court Clerk Frank M. Conaway Sr., A. Robert Kaufman, Mike Schaefer and Philip A. Brown Jr. The former high school principal ran unsuccessfully in the Democratic primary for mayor against Martin O'Malley in 2003.
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