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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | September 10, 1994
Bud Delp is running horses in back-to-back co-features at Pimlico Race Course this afternoon, including heavily favored Western Echo in the inaugural Bernard P. Bond Stakes and the venerable Sunny Sunrise in the Grade III Polynesian Stakes.But the well-known trainer won't be in Baltimore to watch them run.Like numerous other Maryland horsemen, Delp is on his way to the September yearling sale in Keeneland, Ky., where over the next nine days nearly 3,500 horses will be auctioned off.It's an annual trek for Delp and his owners Harry and Tom Meyerhoff, who over the years have had stellar success at the sale, purchasing three-time champion and Horse of the Year Spectacular Bid there for $37,000 as well other equine millionaires like Dispersal and Sunny Sunrise for bargain prices.
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Sun reports via Maryland Jockey Club | May 11, 2014
When Rosie Napravnik ventures to Pimlico Race Course to ride Bayern in Saturday's 139th running of the Preakness, the 26-year-old riding star can expect an emotional homecoming. A familiar face will not be there to greet her. Trainer Dickie Small, who gave her a leg up on her very first winner, died April 4. "There'll be a void at Pimlico," said Napravnik, who guided the Small-trained Ringofdiamonds to victory at Pimlico in her first career ride on June 9, 2005. "When I ride in big races and do well, he's one of the first people I think of. I know how proud of me he would be. " Small's presence will be missed next weekend, but Napravnik can expect a lot of support from family and friends at Pimlico as she attempts to realize a schoolgirl's dream of someday winning the Preakness, as well as the Kentucky Derby.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Proctor and By Stephen Proctor,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
"Keeneland," by Alyson Hagy. Simon & Schuster. 270 pages. $23. On the backstretch of every racetrack in America, invisible to fans betting their two bucks in the grandstand, is a gritty subculture of oddball characters and hard-luck gypsies who do the grunt work in the Sport of Kings. Alyson Hagy's "Keeneland" gives readers a fascinating look at this hardscrabble life, and her timing couldn't be better. The novel arrives weeks before the Kentucky Derby, the only time ordinary Americans pay any attention to horse racing.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | April 18, 2014
Et cetera Sagamore filly wins $100,000 stakes race Sagamore Racing homebred Daring Dancer, a 3-year-old filly ridden by jockey Alan Garcia , won the $100,000 Appalachian Stakes on Thursday at Keeneland in Lexington, Ky., in her first start of the year. She completed the 1-mile distance on the turf in 1 minute, 36.04 seconds and paid $12.60. It was Daring Dancer's third consecutive win. Ripken Baseball: New Zealand and Puerto Rico were added to the international division teams playing in the 15th annual Cal Ripken World Series this summer.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | July 21, 1993
There was not much of a markup when the Maryland-bred half-sister to $2 million earner Safely Kept sold at the Keeneland (Ky.) sales on Monday.Baltimore county breeder David Hayden originally sold the Dayjur-Safely Home filly as a weanling last fall for $330,000 to William O. Reed. When Reed re-sold her Monday, she brought $350,000.The purchasers were Robert and Beverly Lewis of Pomona, Calif. A Keeneland spokesman said the Lewises are clients of trainer D. Wayne Lukas.One other Maryland-bred was sold during the first three of the four sessions.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | December 2, 1993
Big prices for little horses.That's how the trade magazines characterized the explosion in the thoroughbred weanling market at the recently concluded Keeneland (Ky.) sales, where prices for foals, just weaned from their mothers, jumped 25.9 percent from a year ago.Local breeders Carolyn and Ron Green from Westminster cashed in on the bonanza, selling a 9-month-old Maryland-bred filly for $280,000.Making that kind of score is almost the equivalent of winning a Grade I stakes and is the biggest payday the Greens have experienced in 25 years in the horse business.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2001
Patrons of Maryland horse tracks and off-track-betting centers can watch and wager on races from Keeneland beginning today. The MidAtlantic Cooperative, a group of 17 tracks including Pimlico and Laurel Park, reached an agreement yesterday with Keeneland that will allow the Keeneland signal to flow into Maryland betting facilities. The mid-Atlantic tracks had refused to simulcast Keeneland races after Keeneland lowered its takeout, cutting into the receiving tracks' profits. Martin Lieberman, executive director of the cooperative, declined to reveal specifics of the deal.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
Officials of the two auctioneering firms that will sell nearly 400 thoroughbred yearlings in Maryland during the next week hope that the strong market response at the recently concluded nine-day Keeneland, Ky., sale will carry over here.The Kentucky auction, the strongest fall yearling sale in its DTC 50-year history, grossed more than $87 million for nearly 2,500 horses, a 24 percent increase from a year ago."I'm guardedly optimistic," said Mason Grasty, executive vice president of Fasig-Tipton Midlantic Inc., the firm that will sell the bulk of the state's yearling sales crop on Oct. 3 and 4 at the Timonium Fairgrounds.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1995
Billy Boniface doesn't miss a beat.Last Saturday, he had a first, a second and a third in three Maryland Million races, and kept his standing as the Million's winningest trainer.Today Boniface is in Kentucky, running the Maryland-bred filly Rose Law Firm in the $250,000 Queen Elizabeth II Stakes at Keeneland Race Course.The Grade I Queen Elizabeth II is by invitation only, but drew Boniface principally because the race is certain to be run on the grass."The racing secretary told me it will go on the turf unless there's two feet of snow," Boniface said.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1999
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- The hammer fell ... $3 million ... $2.8 million ... $2.5 million. Twenty times the auctioneer's hammer fell at $1 million or more in the annual high-stakes, high-risk drama known as the Keeneland July Selected Yearling Sale.During nine intoxicating hours Monday and Tuesday in a swank pavilion here in the heart of horse country, a sheik, a prince and the wealthiest of sportsmen engaged in a spectacle of ego fulfillment, business investment and romantic adventure.In the process they established a world record for what might be sport's ultimate gamble: trying to pick a future Kentucky Derby winner from horses barely a year old, horses that have never run on a track or even experienced a human on their back.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | October 29, 2011
Colleges No. 1 Terps men lose in soccer at Clemson, 2-1 The No. 1 Maryland men's soccer team (13-2-2, 4-2-1 Atlantic Coast Conference), sporting a makeshift backline, fell, 2-1, at Clemson (6-8-1, 3-4 ACC) on a cold, rainy Friday night. John Stertzer scored his team-leading 13th goal of the season for the Terps , who played a man up for the majority of the match after a red card was issued to the Tigers' Jack Metcalf in the 23rd minute. Stertzer's header flicked over goalkeeper Cody Mizell from 8 yards after a free kick from Taylor Kemp in the 36th minute.
SPORTS
By Los Angeles Times | May 17, 2008
In the fractious sport of horse racing, even dirt can create controversy. The issue is dirt tracks vs. synthetic surfaces, a debate that has come to the forefront since the Eight Belles tragedy at the Kentucky Derby. Many believe synthetic tracks, which include about 80 percent sand and a mixture of fibers and waxes, can reduce injuries and deaths among horses. Others say dirt tracks, if properly maintained, are better for the sport. The evidence, while sometimes conflicting, favors synthetic tracks.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | May 12, 2008
Trainer Reade Baker looked around the Pimlico Race Course barn Saturday morning. What he saw was the rain pounding on the roof and, aside from his Preakness entry Kentucky Bear, a lot of empty stalls. "I'm from the old school," Baker said. "I've been in this a long time, and I've always thought you take a good horse to a big race early. "I want my horse here. I want to take him to the track and breeze him and see how he likes it. I want to take him to the paddock and school him in the gate.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | October 7, 2006
On a cool morning at Laurel Park, Promenade Girl's narrow brown face appears over the stall door. She must know timing is everything. It is just then that her trainer, Larry Murray, happens by with a handful of peppermints. The 4-year-old daughter of Carson City eagerly dips her nose into Murray's hand for the treats, and the trainer rubs her forehead with his free hand. These two became a successful team over the summer, as Murray has turned the filly into a winning interstate traveler.
SPORTS
April 20, 2006
Et cetera Peterson's car deal legit, Oklahoma says Oklahoma running back Adrian Peterson did not violate NCAA regulations by buying a car and returning it several weeks later, the school's compliance department has deter mined. Peterson, the runner-up for the 2004 Heisman Trophy, secured a financing agreement and drove the car for several weeks last winter but then returned it, said Bonita Jackson, Peterson's mother. Boxing Baltimore native Hasim Rahman was named the World Boxing Council's Fighter of The Month for defending his heavyweight crown with last month's draw against James Toney in Atlantic City, N.J. Pro football The San Francisco 49ers added a second first-round pick in next week's NFL draft by trading their second- and third-round picks to the Denver Broncos for the 22nd overall selection.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
HALLANDALE BEACH, Fla. - Trainers continue to ship horses out of Palm Meadows, the training center for Gulfstream Park, as an outbreak of strangles received national attention yesterday during a teleconference call supposedly featuring the Florida Derby. The $1 million Florida Derby on Saturday at Gulfstream Park in Hallandale Beach in South Florida is one of the premier races leading to the Kentucky Derby. But yesterday, during a teleconference call sponsored by the National Thoroughbred Racing Association, the race took a backseat to strangles, the bacterial infection confirmed in five horses (with a sixth possible)
SPORTS
By Special to The Sun | April 18, 1993
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- The Charles Town Races will present a simulcast of this afternoon's $125,000-added Lexington Stakes, a 1 1/16-mile test for 3-year-olds, as part of a full-card simulcast from Keeneland Park in Lexington, Ky.The Lexington, one of the final preps leading up to racing's Triple Crown, will be run as Keeneland's eighth race with post time for the first of nine races at 1 p.m.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2004
Michael Dickinson trains off his farm in Maryland, but one of his biggest clients lives in Kentucky - Dr. John Chandler. Chandler owns Mill Ridge Farm in the Bluegrass State and serves as president of Judd- monte Farms, one of the premier breeding operations in the world. Clients don't come much bigger than that, so when Chandler suggests a move with a horse, Dickinson would do well to listen. That dynamic came into play this spring with Western Ransom, who charged from far back to win the Martha Washington Breeders' Cup yesterday at Pimlico.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 8, 2003
According to Nick Nicholson, the president of Keeneland Race Course in Lexington, Ky., the 1938 match race between Seabiscuit and War Admiral at Pimlico is the equivalent in racehorse history of "Babe Ruth's 60th home run or Roger Maris' 61st." So why did Gary Ross, who strove for exact detail when he directed the hit film Seabiscuit, restage that race at Keeneland instead of Pimlico? As he said in an interview the week before the movie's opening, the answer is simple: "Pimlico has been modernized to an extent that made it impossible to use for period purposes."
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