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Keanu Reeves

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By Rene Rodriguez and Rene Rodriguez,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 1996
Why does Keanu Reeves appear to be "on" in some movies, and simply sleepwalking through others? Every time he seems close to definitively settling the question of "Can he really act?" he delivers a performance that makes you change your mind again.Reeves does excel at playing the perpetually dim bulb. Movies like "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" (1989), "Parenthood" (1989) and "I Love You to Death" (1990) all fit. Give him a role that allows him to carry on with eyelids at half-mast and recite dialogue like "Bodacious!"
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 16, 2006
My idea of a romantic gimmick is the one in Groundhog Day. Granted, that inspired piece of pop Buddhism was about a media striver reconfiguring his whole life by living the same 24 hours over and over again. But it also allowed him to fix every dunderheaded mistake he made in courting his true love - each awkward feint, every sorry piece of bravado, any misplaced emphasis and all the bone-headed declarations of his alpha-male worth. The modest gimmick behind the romance of The Lake House is a mailbox that functions as a time portal.
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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1995
Two seminal moments in rock and roll history:The Beatles. On the Ed Sullivan Show. Feb. 9, 1964.Dogstar. At Bohager's Bar & Grill. July 24, 1995.Maybe you had to be there. It's not just the way the band sounds, which is basically loud and, well, loud. It's also the way it looks. Or, more specifically, the way its bass player looks.Just like Keanu Reeves.Which he is. Which is why some 600 people jammed into the cavernous Fells Point-area club to see a band that has yet to record its first album.
FEATURES
By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,SPECIAL TO THE COURANT | June 16, 2006
ANTIBES, France-- --Hearing Keanu Reeves imitate a Jewish grandmother might surprise you. Hearing him talk about staying in one place is downright shocking. "Oy, you get older, you want to settle down," the famously itinerant actor says, sounding more like a bad Catskills comic. Reeves, 41, is in a place that many of us would like to be: stinking rich -- thanks to his 15 percent take of Matrix sequel ticket sales. He has not worked in a year, content to watch the fruits of his labor hit the screen this summer: the time-travel romantic drama The Lake House, which opens today, and the sci-fi adaptation of A Scanner Darkly coming next month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Los Angeles Daily News | July 12, 1991
What's in a name?If yours is Keanu Reeves, you've probably pondered that question once or twice. (Keanu, by the way, is a Hawaiian appellation.)Names have had an unusual impact on the 26-year-old Lebanon-born, Toronto-raised actor's movie career.Of course, there's Ted, the San Dimas heavy-metal kid Reeves is famous for playing in the comedy "Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure" and its sequel, "Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey," which comes to theaters July 19.Mr. Reeves is so natural as the good-hearted, air guitar-playing airhead that it's become his signature film persona.
FEATURES
By RON DICKER and RON DICKER,SPECIAL TO THE COURANT | June 16, 2006
ANTIBES, France-- --Hearing Keanu Reeves imitate a Jewish grandmother might surprise you. Hearing him talk about staying in one place is downright shocking. "Oy, you get older, you want to settle down," the famously itinerant actor says, sounding more like a bad Catskills comic. Reeves, 41, is in a place that many of us would like to be: stinking rich -- thanks to his 15 percent take of Matrix sequel ticket sales. He has not worked in a year, content to watch the fruits of his labor hit the screen this summer: the time-travel romantic drama The Lake House, which opens today, and the sci-fi adaptation of A Scanner Darkly coming next month.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 16, 2006
My idea of a romantic gimmick is the one in Groundhog Day. Granted, that inspired piece of pop Buddhism was about a media striver reconfiguring his whole life by living the same 24 hours over and over again. But it also allowed him to fix every dunderheaded mistake he made in courting his true love - each awkward feint, every sorry piece of bravado, any misplaced emphasis and all the bone-headed declarations of his alpha-male worth. The modest gimmick behind the romance of The Lake House is a mailbox that functions as a time portal.
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2001
Try explaining Keanu Reeves' appeal to a guy, and you're likely to run into a roadblock. But lots of women get it. When he looks at you with those baby browns, well, something cosmic happens. Forgotten are his struggles as a serious actor; he's forgiven his flaws for that earnest quality he brings to each role. That said, "Sweet November" may wear patience thin. As a romantic lead, he starts off on the wrong foot as a sour-pants hot-shot ad exec, Nelson Moss. He is reunited with his "Devil's Advocate" co-star, Charlize Theron, who plays Sara Deever, a bohemian who tries to rehabilitate men who've lost the ability to connect with others.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
Gene Hackman, in Maryland for the third time in five years to film a movie, lamented that he didn't buy a house in town. Keanu Reeves smiled at the suggestion that he have dinner with 20,000 extras. And producer Dylan Sellers, in keeping with the state's water conservation measures, joked that his on-screen football players wouldn't be allowed to drink water during practice.Yesterday at PSINet Stadium, the creative team behind the latest movie to be filmed in Maryland assembled to meet the press, officially announce that filming would start Monday and say how happy they were to be here.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1999
The bleachers beneath Jennifer Jenecek wobbled, perspiration ran down her forehead, and she knew she had little chance of glimpsing her Hollywood dream stud.But the 14-year-old from Woodbridge, Va., bent as far as she could over the bleacher wall at PSINet Stadium, to get a quick taste of eye-candy."I'm waiting for Keanu, baby," she said, practically hanging over the wall, as her man, in football uniform and a blue baseball cap, trotted out and gave a quick wave. "I'm going to marry this guy."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2005
I did Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure. They made a cereal out of it, so once you've had a cereal, it doesn't get much more surreal than that. -- Keanu Reeves, while plugging his new movie, Constantine.
BUSINESS
By Ruth Ryon and Ruth Ryon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2003
LOS ANGELES - Keanu Reeves, star of the futuristic thriller The Matrix Reloaded, has purchased a Hollywood Hills home for close to $5 million. The gated estate was built in the late 1980s as an art collector's residence. The home has striking city views, high ceilings and substantial wall space for displaying art. There are three bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms in slightly more than 5,000 square feet. The one-story contemporary also has a pond, a 50-foot-long infinity pool, a center courtyard and three fireplaces.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | September 23, 2001
TORONTO -- Keanu Reeves jokes with his young co-stars in a hotel hallway about their experience in Hardball, the heart-tugging baseball movie currently in local theaters. They have gathered to meet journalists, and Reeves finishes the reunion by saying, "Thanks for watching my back." Then he walks into the room for this interview, and his joy deflates faster than a whoopee cushion. He now has to dole out information, a role that makes him far more uncomfortable than playing the hustler-turned-coach in Hardball.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 14, 2001
I want to believe in the redemptive power of baseball as much as the next person, but I need more than the say-so of a Hollywood screenwriter. Hardball is as shallow and manipulative a movie as any that come to mind. It's nothing more than a mawkish feel-gooder about a down-on-his-luck white guy put in charge of a bunch of down-on-their-luck black kids who only want to play baseball. Then - surprise! surprise! - both parties bring out the best in each other, their luck changes, and all's well with the world.
NEWS
By Matthew Olshan | April 15, 2001
I RECENTLY was in the basement of Ford's Theater in Washington standing in front of a hermetically sealed glass cube the size of a commercial refrigerator inspecting the blood-stained topcoat Abraham Lincoln wore the night he was shot dead. My visit to the theater had been surreal up to that point because of a dramatic narrative presentation by a young man in a Park Service uniform who sounded suspiciously like Keanu Reeves -- "And that's when the dude leaped over the balcony and shouted "Sic semper tyrannis!
FEATURES
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2001
Try explaining Keanu Reeves' appeal to a guy, and you're likely to run into a roadblock. But lots of women get it. When he looks at you with those baby browns, well, something cosmic happens. Forgotten are his struggles as a serious actor; he's forgiven his flaws for that earnest quality he brings to each role. That said, "Sweet November" may wear patience thin. As a romantic lead, he starts off on the wrong foot as a sour-pants hot-shot ad exec, Nelson Moss. He is reunited with his "Devil's Advocate" co-star, Charlize Theron, who plays Sara Deever, a bohemian who tries to rehabilitate men who've lost the ability to connect with others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | September 23, 2001
TORONTO -- Keanu Reeves jokes with his young co-stars in a hotel hallway about their experience in Hardball, the heart-tugging baseball movie currently in local theaters. They have gathered to meet journalists, and Reeves finishes the reunion by saying, "Thanks for watching my back." Then he walks into the room for this interview, and his joy deflates faster than a whoopee cushion. He now has to dole out information, a role that makes him far more uncomfortable than playing the hustler-turned-coach in Hardball.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 11, 2000
There's a howling improbability at the core of "The Replacements," the genial if uneven comedy that filmed at Baltimore's PSINet stadium last year. Keanu Reeves plays a quarterback who leads a rag-tag team of ne'er-do-wells to victory by dint of his magnetic personality and irresistible leadership skills. Reeves may be able to play excellent adventurers and affectless cyber-noir heroes convincingly, but the Gipper he ain't. Other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, "The Replacements" isn't all that bad, buoyed by a colorful group of comic character actors and the presence of Gene Hackman, who has enough personality and leadership skill to make up for Reeves' blank slate of a performance.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 8, 2000
"The Watcher" exists for one reason - to establish how many slow-motion sequences can be crammed into one movie. They sure show up everywhere: When the main character is having a dream. When the bad guy is approaching his next victim. When the hero is driving down the street. When the director realizes five minutes have gone by without one. I wish I could simply supply the answer and save untold hundreds the price of admission, but I lost track around 20. At that point - maybe two-thirds of the way through the film - I began addressing what, at the time, seemed like greater concerns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff | August 13, 2000
Years from now, when the lifetime-achievement Oscar is announced, this summer may be remembered as the turning point in the acting career of PSINet Stadium. Its evocative performance in the new Warner Bros. film "The Replacements," which opened Friday, is nothing short of a breakthrough. We see PSINet grow from an awkwardly named oval where the Jacksonville Jaguars come to humiliate Baltimore each year to a mythical structure that can nurture dreams and fulfill hopes. Through the magic of special effects, the stadium appears, by the end of the movie, to be a place where exciting football is played.
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