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FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2002
Intense. Brilliant. Exciting. Difficult. These were the kinds of adjectives that attached themselves to Rod Steiger, the Oscar-winning star of such classics as In the Heat of the Night and On the Waterfront who died yesterday at age 77. Steiger died at a Los Angeles-area hospital of pneumonia and kidney failure, said his publicist, Lori DeWaal. Born Rodney Stephen Steiger on April 14, 1925, in Westhampton, N.Y., he quit school at age 16 to join the Navy and served on a destroyer in the Pacific during World War II. After the war, he found his way to the Actors Studio where he became a "Method actor," learning to look within himself for the key to a character.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 1, 2001
MOSCOW - President Vladimir V. Putin, like President Bush, says his country is fighting terrorism and not Islam, but this is a place where neither Putin nor anyone else can escape history. Russia has a long and complicated relationship with the Muslim world. Russians have lived under Muslim rule and have imposed their power on Muslims. Russian Orthodox and Muslims have lived side by side for centuries, each absorbing culture and ways of thought from the other, but each remaining distinct.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1999
Susan Stamberg doesn't mind being referred to as one of the founding mothers of National Public Radio, even if that does make her sound more like a museum piece than a working journalist.And, like all good mothers. Stamberg believes the best of NPR is yet to come."Oh, absolutely," she says over the phone from her Washington office, where she continues to report as a special correspondent for NPR, concentrating on cultural affairs (which includes, she jokes, everything that "is not Wall Street or the White House or Capitol Hill")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,Special to the Sun | April 18, 1999
Hilton Kramer's new book, and much else, can clear up the residual hypocrisies about a genuine threat.What is Stalinism? Now that the Cold War is over and the Soviet Union a fast-fading memory, the question may seem academic. But once upon a not-so-distant time, Americans who believed devoutly that Joseph Stalin was a great and good leader wielded real power in this country's cultural life -- enough that they could make life difficult for those who dared to point out that their hero happened to be the world's most wanted mass murderer.
NEWS
By Arnold Rosenfeld | March 23, 1999
IN HIS 1976 memoir of the Holocaust, "The Sunflower," Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal recalls how as a young concentration camp inmate he was called to the deathbed of a grotesquely wounded SS officer. The SS man begged Wiesenthal, as a Jew, to forgive his role in a wartime atrocity. Wiesenthal refused, saying he had no right to forgive on behalf of the victims.The legendary film director Elia Kazan was honored the other night with an Oscar for his lifetime achievements. Outside, pickets protested.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 22, 1999
Judi Dench was almost apologetic after receiving her Best Supporting Actress award for her imperious take on Queen Elizabeth in "Shakespeare In Love."Noting that she was only on camera for about eight minutes, Dame Judi said, "That's why I didn't reckon that I would be standing here with this...I certainly thought it would go to somebody who had the full length of the film."Asked if she saw similarities between her take on Elizabeth and her acclaimed performance as Queen Victoria in last year's "Mrs.
NEWS
By George F. Will | March 21, 1999
WASHINGTON -- At tonight's Academy Awards ceremony, Elia Kazan, the director, will be honored for his professional achievements.The honor comes to him belatedly because of what his political beliefs impelled him to do in 1952.The honor for him is disputed by some people who paid a price for their political beliefs and by others who sympathize with those people. Some protesters argue that he should be made to suffer a kind of continuing ostracism because of his beliefs, because he participated in an episode in which people suffered for their beliefs.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1999
It's hard to deny that Elia Kazan is one of the country's greatest living filmmakers, with a resume that includes "A Streetcar Named Desire," "On the Waterfront," "Splendor in the Grass" and "East of Eden.'But it's just as hard to deny that Kazan's naming of names during the great red hunt of the 1950s damaged several careers and helped legitimize a process that would destroy dozens more. Of the seven actors he named before the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) -- Lewis Leverett, J. Edward Bromberg, Phoebe Brand, Morris Carnovsky, Tony Kraber, Paula Miller and Art Smith -- not one had a career that amounted to more than a minor footnote in stage and movie history.
NEWS
By Nicolaus Mills | March 3, 1999
HONORARY Oscars are a regular feature of Academy Award night, and this year will be no exception. But the warm glow that in the past has come when a Fred Astaire or a Greta Garbo received an honorary Oscar won't be present March 21 when famed director Elia Kazan, 89, is honored for his long and distinguished career. The controversy over Mr. Kazan does not stem from his work, which includes two best-director Oscars and such admired films as "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn," "A Streetcar Named Desire" and "On the Waterfront."
FEATURES
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 5, 1998
Just look at those flowers: 10 feet tall, their petals golden yellow, the centers filled with enough seeds for a real bird feast.Or half that size, with velvety petals. Wine red.Or even shorter, blooms so packed with fluffy petals you might mistake then for chrysanthemums.Sunflowers all, and you wouldn't believe how much they've changed in the past few years. Even Van Gogh might not recognize the new cousins of the golden-yellow sunflowers he painted with such drama.Flower breeders came up with sunflowers pale as lemon sherbet, white as cream and red as Burgundy wine.
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