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By Arnold Rosenfeld | March 23, 1999
IN HIS 1976 memoir of the Holocaust, "The Sunflower," Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal recalls how as a young concentration camp inmate he was called to the deathbed of a grotesquely wounded SS officer. The SS man begged Wiesenthal, as a Jew, to forgive his role in a wartime atrocity. Wiesenthal refused, saying he had no right to forgive on behalf of the victims.The legendary film director Elia Kazan was honored the other night with an Oscar for his lifetime achievements. Outside, pickets protested.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
The AFI-Silver's simultaneous tributes to Orson Welles and Elia Kazan celebrate the sizzling theatrical instincts of two creative marvels of the stage who transformed the face — let's make that faces — of American films. Kazan and Marlon Brando forged one of the most influential director-actor partnerships in American movies, but James Dean, too, made his name with Kazan, in the 1955 film version of John Steinbeck's "East of Eden" (Saturday at 4:30 p.m and Sunday at 7:20 p.m.)
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NEWS
By George F. Will | March 21, 1999
WASHINGTON -- At tonight's Academy Awards ceremony, Elia Kazan, the director, will be honored for his professional achievements.The honor comes to him belatedly because of what his political beliefs impelled him to do in 1952.The honor for him is disputed by some people who paid a price for their political beliefs and by others who sympathize with those people. Some protesters argue that he should be made to suffer a kind of continuing ostracism because of his beliefs, because he participated in an episode in which people suffered for their beliefs.
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
Fayad Kazan brought a bouquet of red and pink roses for his wife. He had five stuffed Mickey Mouse dolls and five American flags, one for each of his young children. From 8:30 a.m., he sat in a cordoned-off section of the international arrival terminal. He waited. An additional 454 U.S. citizens returned home from Lebanon yesterday on two flights from Cyprus that touched down at 9:45 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Kazan's family members were not among them.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren and Gerri Kobren,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1994
In 1961, movie and theater director Elia Kazan created, in script-like form, a story about a poor Greek lad whose goal in life was coming to America. Published as "America, America," it was the first in a four-A series that also comprises "The Anatolian," "The Arrangement" and now "Beyond the Aegean," all about the adventures of Stavros Topouzoglou.Time, of course, has passed; "Aegean" begins in 1919, and Stavros is 42. In this book, he's going home -- not to Greece but to Anatolia, the western extension of Asia Minor, which then had been under Turkish dominion for centuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 30, 1992
Ten, count 'em. Ten. Years that is, logged in residence by the Baltimore Film Forum at the Baltimore Museum of Art. And in celebration of this decade of symbiosis the forum, which is 24 years old chronologically, will hold a little celebration at the museum at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 26, 2004
As part of its continuing Elia Kazan tribute, the AFI Silver in Silver Spring presents on Tuesday Baby Doll (1956), a film that succeeds where so many others (including John Ford's Tobacco Road) have failed - at making high aesthetic inroads into low rural farce. Kazan had the idea for Tennessee Williams to combine two of his one-act plays, Twenty-Seven Wagons Full of Cotton and The Long Stay Cut Short, or The Unsatisfactory Supper, into an original screenplay filled with comic hubris and erotic heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 20, 2005
Watching that great but miscast actor Liam Neeson glower his way through Kinsey, I kept thinking how much more fun Warren Beatty would have had with the part. Throughout Beatty's career, his innate erotic confidence has empowered him to play impotence (in Bonnie and Clyde), abstinence (in parts of Reds) and middle-aged panic (in Bulworth). Sexual befuddlement is not beyond his range. In fact, it's with a combination of ardor and confusion that Beatty began his film career and became an instant star.
FEATURES
By Nancy Brachey and Nancy Brachey,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 5, 1998
Just look at those flowers: 10 feet tall, their petals golden yellow, the centers filled with enough seeds for a real bird feast.Or half that size, with velvety petals. Wine red.Or even shorter, blooms so packed with fluffy petals you might mistake then for chrysanthemums.Sunflowers all, and you wouldn't believe how much they've changed in the past few years. Even Van Gogh might not recognize the new cousins of the golden-yellow sunflowers he painted with such drama.Flower breeders came up with sunflowers pale as lemon sherbet, white as cream and red as Burgundy wine.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 30, 2005
Live fast, die young, leave a good-looking corpse." The postwar hipster slogan that director Nicholas Ray popularized in his 1949 picture Knock On Any Door applied with startling directness to Ray's most famous star, James Dean, who played the title role in Rebel Without a Cause (1955), the filmmaker's epochal misunderstood-youth movie. Dean died 50 years ago today at age 24 when his Porsche 550 Spyder crashed into a Ford. Roughly two hours before, Dean had been cited for driving 65 in a 45 mph zone.
NEWS
By DAVID CAUTE | November 27, 2005
Elia Kazan: A Biography Richard Schickel HarperCollins / 510 pages From his formative years, Elia Kazan's role models among directors included Stanislavsky, Dovzhenko and the maestros of European expressionism. As a quintessentially American genius of stage and screen, passionately believing in "roots," Kazan unveiled Marlon Brando and James Dean for audiences far beyond America's shores. During his heyday (1930-1960), Kazan virtually re-explored the terrain of John Dos Passos' trilogy, U.S.A.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 30, 2005
Live fast, die young, leave a good-looking corpse." The postwar hipster slogan that director Nicholas Ray popularized in his 1949 picture Knock On Any Door applied with startling directness to Ray's most famous star, James Dean, who played the title role in Rebel Without a Cause (1955), the filmmaker's epochal misunderstood-youth movie. Dean died 50 years ago today at age 24 when his Porsche 550 Spyder crashed into a Ford. Roughly two hours before, Dean had been cited for driving 65 in a 45 mph zone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 20, 2005
Watching that great but miscast actor Liam Neeson glower his way through Kinsey, I kept thinking how much more fun Warren Beatty would have had with the part. Throughout Beatty's career, his innate erotic confidence has empowered him to play impotence (in Bonnie and Clyde), abstinence (in parts of Reds) and middle-aged panic (in Bulworth). Sexual befuddlement is not beyond his range. In fact, it's with a combination of ardor and confusion that Beatty began his film career and became an instant star.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 26, 2004
As part of its continuing Elia Kazan tribute, the AFI Silver in Silver Spring presents on Tuesday Baby Doll (1956), a film that succeeds where so many others (including John Ford's Tobacco Road) have failed - at making high aesthetic inroads into low rural farce. Kazan had the idea for Tennessee Williams to combine two of his one-act plays, Twenty-Seven Wagons Full of Cotton and The Long Stay Cut Short, or The Unsatisfactory Supper, into an original screenplay filled with comic hubris and erotic heat.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 3, 2004
By his professional methods and by his personal stands, the legendary actor was far ahead of his time. Marlon Brando's extraordinary emotional intelligence expressed itself in every inch of his body for every second - the phrase "being in the moment" might as well have been coined for him. Of course, other actors in New York and Hollywood had been as physically expressive as Brando (think Cagney) and as naturalistic (think Barbara Stanwyck). But Brando went deeper and further: his urgent sensitivity and imagination gave his performances a poetic dimension that transcended realism.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | October 5, 2003
Elia Kazan was all about passion. He put it on the screen, he infused his life with it, and he elicited it from all manner of audiences. Few directors have engendered so much controversy in their lifetimes, or hewn so stubbornly to beliefs that, while perhaps not universally popular, were definitely their own. When he died last Sunday at his New York home, Kazan left a legacy that critics and commentators still will be wrestling with decades from now....
NEWS
By CHRIS YAKAITIS and CHRIS YAKAITIS,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
Fayad Kazan brought a bouquet of red and pink roses for his wife. He had five stuffed Mickey Mouse dolls and five American flags, one for each of his young children. From 8:30 a.m., he sat in a cordoned-off section of the international arrival terminal. He waited. An additional 454 U.S. citizens returned home from Lebanon yesterday on two flights from Cyprus that touched down at 9:45 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Kazan's family members were not among them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 27, 2003
When Barry Levinson plays host for On the Waterfront at the Senator Theatre Thursday night -- the opening attraction for this year's Maryland Film Festival -- he hopes audiences will feel the same thrill he experienced as a 12-year-old seeing it in 1954 at the Ambassador Theatre, at Liberty Heights and Gwynn Oak avenues. As he says over the phone from his headquarters in Connecticut, where he's finishing a comic fable about envy called Envy (with Ben Stiller, Jack Black, Rachel Weisz and Christopher Walken)
FEATURES
By Mervyn Rothstein and Mervyn Rothstein,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 29, 2003
Elia Kazan, the immigrant child of a Greek rug merchant who became one of the most honored and influential directors in Broadway and Hollywood history, died yesterday at his home in New York. He was 94. Kazan's achievements in theater and cinema helped define the American experience for more than a generation. For Broadway, his legendary productions included A Streetcar Named Desire, Death of a Salesman, The Skin of Our Teeth, All My Sons, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Sweet Bird of Youth, The Dark at the Top of the Stairs, Tea and Sympathy and J.B. His movie classics include A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, A Streetcar Named Desire, On the Waterfront, Viva Zapata!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 27, 2003
When Barry Levinson plays host for On the Waterfront at the Senator Theatre Thursday night -- the opening attraction for this year's Maryland Film Festival -- he hopes audiences will feel the same thrill he experienced as a 12-year-old seeing it in 1954 at the Ambassador Theatre, at Liberty Heights and Gwynn Oak avenues. As he says over the phone from his headquarters in Connecticut, where he's finishing a comic fable about envy called Envy (with Ben Stiller, Jack Black, Rachel Weisz and Christopher Walken)
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