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NEWS
January 4, 1992
It's hard to be a puppet without a master, a believer whose god died, a follower with no leader, a bloc with no center, a copy whose role model renounced the role. While there are Communists who boast of new philosophies, it is harder for governments to do so.China's official Xinhua News Agency bitterly denounced reform in the former Soviet Union. It said that Mikhail S. Gorbachev's " 'new thinking,' 'glasnost,' and 'political pluralism' have brought political chaos, ethnic strife and economic crisis."
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SPORTS
February 12, 2002
.....................................G S B Tot. Germany.................2 3 1 6 United States.........2 3 1 6 Austria.....................1 1 4 6 Norway................... 2 2 0 4 Russia.....................1 1 1 3 Italy..........................2 0 0 2 Finland...................1 1 0 2 Netherlands..........1 1 0 2 Switzerland...........1 0 1 2 Canada ..................0 1 1 2 Spain..................... 1 0 0 1 France................... 0 1 0 1 China......................0 0 1 1 Czech Republic.
NEWS
October 15, 2004
U.S.- Russian crew on way to 6-month space mission BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan - A rocket carrying two Russian cosmonauts and an American astronaut to the International Space Station streaked into orbit yesterday, the latest flight of a Russian space vehicle to fill in for grounded U.S. shuttles. The spaceship is due to dock with the station tomorrow at 8:17 a.m. Moscow time. During the six-month mission, the new crew will do experiments to research new AIDS vaccines, study plant growth and go on at least two space walks.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | October 9, 1994
Farmers in Kazakhstan, a country in the former Soviet Union, have been raising sheep for hundreds of years.Problem is, they're still using many of the same methods they used when nomads traveled the area centuries ago, said Paul Tashner, president of TCO International, a Westminster-based enterprise helping Russian and American companies do business together."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After a secret odyssey over two continents and the highways of the eastern United States, the last of a shipment of weapons-grade Soviet uranium strong enough to make 20 nuclear bombs arrived yesterday at a government facility in Tennessee.Government officials described the capture of the material -- totaling about 1,320 pounds of highly enriched uranium 235 packed in foam-filled steel containers -- as a major coup in the battle against nuclear proliferation.Its arrival ended a nine-month operation called Project Sapphire in which the United States transferred the radioactive material from the former Soviet republic of Kazakhstan for safekeeping.
NEWS
May 7, 1992
President Bush suddenly finds himself caught between the political imperative to pour more money into America's troubled big cities and the security imperative to provide financial incentives to ex-Soviet states squabbling over control of strategic nuclear weapons.Yesterday he secured President Leonid Kravchuk's assurance that Ukraine will become a non-nuclear power after offering a handsome trade-and-aid package. Then he flew off to California to deal with a domestic crisis that has sparked Senate questioning of administration bailout plans for the Commonwealth of Independent States.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1993
Chevron, Kazakhstan oil dealKazakhstan and Chevron Corp. signed an agreement yesterday to develop one of the world's largest oil fields in a deal seen as a bellwether for foreign investment in the former Soviet Union.The agreement, called the biggest joint venture ever undertaken in a former Soviet republic, provides for Chevron to develop the Tengiz oil field and the much smaller Korolev field in western Kazakhstan over 40 years for about $20 billion.Dollar's slide against yen haltsThe dollar ended a four-day free fall against the yen yesterday as repeated buying of dollars by the Bank of Japan finally curbed the trend in a holiday-hushed market.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | May 2, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The United States is close to an agreement with Ukraine on implementing a strategic arms accord reached with the former Soviet Union, U.S. officials said.A deal would mark a breakthrough toward ratification of the pact and assures a warm embrace for Ukrainian President Leonid M. Kravchuk on his visit here next week.Secretary of State James A. Baker III has postponed sending the treaty, which slashes long-range nuclear weapons, to Capitol Hill for ratification until all four nuclear states of the former Soviet Union -- Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and Kazakhstan -- agree to abide by its terms.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1994
LILLEHAMMER, Norway -- It was almost a fitting end to the 1994 Winter Olympic Games.One hundred thirty thousand Norwegians jammed onto the hills at Birkebeineren Ski Stadium. They grilled hot dogs and drank unknown substances from flasks. They sang songs and painted their faces. They slid down hills without sleds.They came in minus-13-degree weather to cheer their heroes, one old in Vegard Ulvang, one new in Bjorn Dahlie.But when the 50-kilometer cross country ski race was finished, they cheered a new champion: gold-medal winner Vladimir Smirnov of Kazakhstan.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 11, 1996
ALMATY, Kazakhstan -- On a brilliant Saturday morning, 300 Uighur families gathered for what should have been an unabashedly happy occasion: the opening of a striking turquoise and white mosque featuring designs from their homeland across the border in China.But these are dark days for the Uighurs (pronounced WEE-gurs), the world's oldest Turkic people and the last large ethnic group in Central Asia living under foreign domination.Whether at the oases of Xinjiang province on China's western frontier or abroad in countries like Kazakhstan, the Uighurs are suffering from China's effort to crush their drive for independence.
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