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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Two kayakers who were injured after falling 200 feet over the face of the dam at Prettyboy Reservoir have been charged with trespassing. Paul K. Hare, 22, and Stephen D. Sparks, 21, both of Parkton, are charged with criminal trespassing and face $1,000 fines and one year in jail, said the Baltimore Environmental Police, which patrol the reservoir. "All things considered, they were lucky," said Officer Heidi Greenleaf with Baltimore Environmental Police. She said she could not recall a similar incident where boaters attempted to go over the dam. Greenleaf said it is unclear whether the men were purposely attempting to go over the dam, or did so accidentally, but that alcohol played a factor.
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FEATURES
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The Scunny Memorial Paddle, which ran from Sept. 16 to 21, turned out to be even less fun than Christopher Furst, a marketing director for Power Plant Live, thought it would be. And the novice kayaker didn't go in expecting the 175-mile kayak trip was going to be a day at the beach. "In all honesty, it was the hardest thing I've ever done in my life. I've played every sport, baseball, football," Furst said, "but this was sheer endurance, paddling eight hours a day in an uncomfortable position.
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SPORTS
By Nate Rabner and The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The brightly colored kayaks strapped to roof racks contrasted with the snow as a small party gathered a couple of weeks ago at the Gunpowder Falls State Park parking lot on Jones Road. Kayakers clad in rubber dry suits, liners and winter coats clambered onto the slush to get ready for the day's boating trip. They would paddle the 3.5 miles of the Gunpowder River, a stretch in northeast Baltimore County that includes Class II and III rapids. But the weather made it difficult just getting cars out of the rendezvous lot to run a shuttle to the put-in spot.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Two kayakers who were injured after falling 200 feet over the face of the dam at Prettyboy Reservoir have been charged with trespassing. Paul K. Hare, 22, and Stephen D. Sparks, 21, both of Parkton, are charged with criminal trespassing and face $1,000 fines and one year in jail, said the Baltimore Environmental Police, which patrol the reservoir. "All things considered, they were lucky," said Officer Heidi Greenleaf with Baltimore Environmental Police. She said she could not recall a similar incident where boaters attempted to go over the dam. Greenleaf said it is unclear whether the men were purposely attempting to go over the dam, or did so accidentally, but that alcohol played a factor.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | March 26, 2006
Even as spring begins, and would-be paddlers look longingly at the water, the kayaking community urges most of them to stay at home. "We try to pull in the reins a bit," said Dave Young, a manager at Spring River Corp., a paddling store in Eastport. "The water temperature is still pretty low." The problem, Young said, is that less-experienced kayakers are more likely to tip and therefore take a frigid - and possibly deadly - bath in the Chesapeake Bay. He says that beginners should really start in May when the temperature of the water catches up to that of the air. Winter kayakers wear dry suits, which are essentially reinforced, well-tailored plastic bags.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2004
This weekend is the last chance for whitewater slalom kayakers and canoers to qualify for the Olympic team trials, from April 2 to 4 in South Bend, Ind. The event, at the Nantahalla Outdoor Center in North Carolina, will complete a field of 90 athletes for the South Bend competition. A number of Maryland paddlers have made the cut for South Bend, including kayakers Scott Parsons, who is ranked eighth in the world, Brett Heyl and Sarah Leith, canoer Ryan Bahn and the double canoe team of Bob Bofinger and Brian Zimmerman.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
A just-opened boardwalk and creekside platform offer new access to a nature preserve at the southwestern edge of Anne Arundel County, providing kayakers with an entry by water and hikers with and a up-close encounters with its marsh. "The wetland is there. And you can see it through the trees. But without a boardwalk, you can't take advantage of it, both for research and the public," said Chris Swarth, the longtime director of the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary. At 1,600 acres, it's the largest of Anne Arundel County's parks and hugs an area of the Patuxent River that is popular with kayakers and canoeists.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | August 14, 2012
Back River isn't the only Baltimore area water body cluttered with used tires.  The Gunpowder River, arguably one of the region's most popular recreational water ways, has its share, too. Gunpowder Falls State Park draws anglers, kayakers, picnickers, swimmers and scads of tubers - so many, in fact, that friction has arisen over the transformation of the river through northern Baltimore County into what critics call a " superhighway of...
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | October 13, 2005
An editorial in a recent issue of National Geographic Traveler magazine complained that kayakers in Maine found "residential development" near national parks and urged its readers to use their "influence" to prevent such things. "You are the stakeholders in our national parks," it said. Really? What stake do kayakers and others of like mind have that is not also a stake held by people who build the vacation homes whose presence offends the kayak set? Homeowners are just as much citizens and taxpayers as kayakers are, and they are even entitled to equal treatment under the 14th Amendment.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | November 23, 2003
A Memorable Place Kayakers greet morning on the bay By Rebecca Motil SPECIAL TO THE SUN We woke before dawn -- four adults and three teen-age girls -- to take a sunrise kayak tour of Oyster Bay, a wide body of water between Chincoteague and Assateague islands. By 6:30 a.m., we were helping our guide from Oyster Bay Outfitters unload the kayaks. As we waited, the late- August sun came up in the east, painting the clouds in delicate shades of pink, melon and gold. After a thorough safety lesson, our guide, Ray Miles, led his intrepid kayakers out into the bay. We headed for 427-acre Morris Island, gliding across the calm water like swans.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
One patient was released from hospital care and another was in stable condition at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Monday, after the two fell 200 feet off Prettyboy Dam in northern Baltimore County this weekend, police said. It was not clear whether the men, in their early 20s, were hiking or kayaking before the fall, Baltimore Environmental Police Officer Heidi Greenleaf said, but alcohol was a factor in the incident. The men were not identified. The one who was released from York General Hospital had a broken left arm and head injuries, and the other remained hospitalized at Shock Trauma Monday with a severe head injury, possible broken bones and internal injuries, Greenleaf said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
Matt Corasanti was taking his gear off after a quick, after-work kayak outing in Fells Point when a frantic man ran up to him, saying his dog had fallen into the water and asking whether Corasanti could help him. Corasanti hopped back into his kayak, docked at the Canton Kayak Club's pier in the 1600 block of Thames St., and paddled toward the puppy, which was trying to scramble back over a concrete barrier and onto the dock. But he couldn't reach the puppy. So the 28-year-old Canton man slipped out of his kayak and into the harbor.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
A multi-agency, multi-day search for a Potomac River kayaker was called off on Sunday after it was determined he had simply ditched his kayak and gone home — "oblivious" to the fact that authorities became alarmed after finding his kayak floating upside down. The Montgomery County Police Department first requested the public's help on Friday in identifying the owner of the abandoned kayak, which was near the Anglers Inn boat ramp south of Great Falls. Earlier in the day, witnesses at the Great Falls observation deck had reported seeing a man in the kayak, and told police that it had "appeared that he may have needed assistance.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
The gunshot wound suffered by a Virginia man while kayaking in Pasadena in April might have been self-inflicted, Maryland Natural Resources Police said Monday. Police said the man shot himself at his home in Virginia last week and is hospitalized. Natural Resources Police investigators now believe his wound from April might have been self-inflicted. David Seafolk-Kopp, 56, of Reston, Va., was treated at Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore after he was shot in April. Seafolk-Kopp was in a kayak in Main Creek off of Bodkin Creek on the night of April 12, and he told police he saw a red reflection on the water before he was shot.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Maryland Natural Resources Police continue to investigate the case of a man who was shot while kayaking Saturday night and then paddled himself to shore, where he was found the next morning. Police don't know who shot the 56-year-old man from Reston, Va., who was on the water in Main Creek off Bodkin Creek in Pasadena. He had planned an evening of stargazing and reading on a tablet. "We'll find the shooter. It's just going to be a matter of time," said Sgt. Brian Albert of the Natural Resources Police.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
A kayaker in Anne Arundel County was shot in the stomach while paddling in a creek Saturday night, police said. David Seafolk-Kopp, 56, told Maryland Natural Resources Police investigators that he was stargazing on Bodkin Creek when he saw a campfire on shore and could hear people yelling and partying, NRP spokeswoman Candy Thomson said. He then saw a red laser dot on his stomach, and was shot in the upper right abdomen. Seafolk-Kopp, who lives in Reston, Va. and has family in Anne Arundel County, had launched his kayak from a friend's home in the 1400 block of Park Road, Thomson said.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 2, 2007
Sometimes, it's important to see the forest and the trees. By illegally taking a chainsaw to small trees along the Gunpowder River, several members of the Greater Baltimore Canoe Club proved blind to both. It might not seem like a big deal as you walk along the riverbank below Prettyboy Reservoir. Four weeks after the incident, the trunks that end abruptly at the water's edge still look freshly cut, and the severed pieces lie waterlogged below. What's a couple of trees in a thick forest?
NEWS
May 15, 1992
For sports lovers looking for non-Preakness entertainment tomorrow, the place to be is the Savage River in Western Maryland's Garrett County. That's where the Olympic trials for whitewater slalom racing take place, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., tomorrow and again on Sunday.It isn't often that Marylanders get a chance to host an Olympic trial of this nature, and certainly not one as breathtaking as this one. Competitors, male and female, navigate a 350-meter course with 25 gates along the raging river.
SPORTS
By Nate Rabner and The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
The brightly colored kayaks strapped to roof racks contrasted with the snow as a small party gathered a couple of weeks ago at the Gunpowder Falls State Park parking lot on Jones Road. Kayakers clad in rubber dry suits, liners and winter coats clambered onto the slush to get ready for the day's boating trip. They would paddle the 3.5 miles of the Gunpowder River, a stretch in northeast Baltimore County that includes Class II and III rapids. But the weather made it difficult just getting cars out of the rendezvous lot to run a shuttle to the put-in spot.
SPORTS
By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
Hiking with a 50-pound backpack for the better part of a day is physically demanding, but doing so up the side of a mountain is exhausting. Wendy Cirko found that out the hard way. She could have been sitting on a couch in her Bel Air home, watching TV, she said. But as she grabbed tufts of grass to help her on the steep ascent, all the while trying not to think about how far she could fall if she weren't careful, she couldn't help wondering what she had gotten herself into. All this came on just Day Three of her 77-day National Outdoor Leadership School program, a three-part trip through New Zealand that included about 40 days of backpacking, about 30 days of kayaking and about 10 days aboard a 40-foot sailboat.
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