Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKay Redfield Jamison
IN THE NEWS

Kay Redfield Jamison

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff | December 12, 1999
Since she published a new book on suicide, Johns Hopkins medical school psychiatrist Kay Redfield Jamison has been struck by how photographers always seem to render her as dour. The professor who brought mental illness out of the closet is anything but: animated and friendly, a thin, tousled blond, she wears a large smile often painted coral.This despite tough times lately: In recent weeks, Jamison, 53, has spent more time at Hopkins quizzing oncologists treating her husband than teaching residents in psychiatry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010
Madness vs. genius In ‘The Swan Thieves," author Elizabeth Kostova writes about a gifted painter who is afflicted with bipolar disorder. She made up her story. Kay Redfield Jamison actually lived it. Jamison, a psychiatrist at the John Hopkins University who has chronicled her battle with manic-depressive illness, is scheduled to speak Monday night at the Walters Art Museum on what she hypothesizes is a link between creative genius and the particular form of mental illness characterized by frenzied bursts of energy and near-catatonic lows.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff | October 10, 1999
"Night Falls Fast," by Kay Redfield Jamison. Knopf. 432 pages. $25.So many people throughout time have died from suicide, written about it, tried to make sense of it. In this new book, Kay Redfield Jamison attacks this complex, emotionally charged topic without fear. She has created a single, fresh text that answers the question so many have agonized over for so long: Why?In a sweeping, authoritative look at suicide, laced with the compelling tales of those who died or nearly died at their own hands, including herself, Dr. Jamison exposes the truth: Suicide is not one isolated moment of madness for otherwise rational people, but mostly an impulsive act of a patient trying to end the awful pain of a psychiatric illness.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
Where would America be without exuberance, that infectious, agitating mood that sent Teddy Roosevelt to explore the Badlands, write 40 books, recover from his wife's death, remarry and run for president? Where would this country be without the passion of John Muir for Yosemite or the enthusiasm of James Watson for the inside of a cell? Outsized enthusiasm, sometimes ridiculed and often supressed, is underrated in our society - perilously so. At least, that's the theory of Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison, the Johns Hopkins psychiatrist who has studied moods most of her career and whose books shattered myths about depression.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010
Madness vs. genius In ‘The Swan Thieves," author Elizabeth Kostova writes about a gifted painter who is afflicted with bipolar disorder. She made up her story. Kay Redfield Jamison actually lived it. Jamison, a psychiatrist at the John Hopkins University who has chronicled her battle with manic-depressive illness, is scheduled to speak Monday night at the Walters Art Museum on what she hypothesizes is a link between creative genius and the particular form of mental illness characterized by frenzied bursts of energy and near-catatonic lows.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | September 30, 2004
Where would America be without exuberance, that infectious, agitating mood that sent Teddy Roosevelt to explore the Badlands, write 40 books, recover from his wife's death, remarry and run for president? Where would this country be without the passion of John Muir for Yosemite or the enthusiasm of James Watson for the inside of a cell? Outsized enthusiasm, sometimes ridiculed and often supressed, is underrated in our society - perilously so. At least, that's the theory of Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison, the Johns Hopkins psychiatrist who has studied moods most of her career and whose books shattered myths about depression.
NEWS
September 29, 2004
WHEN A LEADING expert on mood disorders writes a book extolling the state of exuberance, you don't know whether to laugh or cry. Laugh gleefully (of course) at the notion that promoting this much-maligned expression of unrestrained, enthusiastic joy might prod the disinclined to join in. Cry -- with joy -- at the acknowledgment that this uber-happiness is a genuine state of being, not false or drug-induced, and worthy of praise. At the very least, Exuberance: The Passion for Life, Kay Redfield Jamison's exuberant take on this often-derided emotion, should let those who exuberate do so wildly and with little concern for embarrassing the unexuberant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff | October 3, 2004
Exuberance: The Passion for Life, by Kay Redfield Jamison. Alfred A. Knopf. 405 pages. $24.95. Psychologist Kay Redfield Jamison opens her new book with the intriguing observation that she and her colleagues have worked harder to understand the dark moods, such as anxiety, depression and anger, while neglecting the positive ones. "We have given sorrow many words," she writes, "but a passion for life few." Her last book, Night Falls Fast: Understanding Suicide, was an authoritative and revealing look at suicide, including her own struggles with manic depression.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2003
With her 1995 book, An Unquiet Mind, Kay Redfield Jamison broke the taboo that kept many scientists and health care professionals from revealing their battles with mental illness. Jamison's memoir chronicled her long struggle with bipolar disorder, which included a suicide attempt, paralyzing depressions and flights into highly charged manias. She described one episode as "raging and weeping and full of destruction and wild energy gone amok." She also discussed her reluctance - shared by many with the illness - to take lithium, a drug that delivered unpleasant side effects but saved her life.
NEWS
By Gerri Kobren | April 11, 1993
TOUCHED WITH FIRE. Kay Redfield Jamison. Free Press. 370 pages. $24.95 George Gordon, Lord Byron, was born into a family notorious for eccentricity, if not downright insanity. On both sides -- the Gordons and the Byrons -- they were moody, emotionally extravagant, suicidal. Little wonder then that the young Lord Byron was described as having "tumultuous passions" while still at school or that he would write privately of his own periods of deepest grief, his mercurial angers and fear of going mad.His genetic inheritance, his writing and behavior were signs and symptoms of manic-depressive illness, argues Kay Redfield Jamison, a professor of psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, in "Touched With Fire."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff | December 12, 1999
Since she published a new book on suicide, Johns Hopkins medical school psychiatrist Kay Redfield Jamison has been struck by how photographers always seem to render her as dour. The professor who brought mental illness out of the closet is anything but: animated and friendly, a thin, tousled blond, she wears a large smile often painted coral.This despite tough times lately: In recent weeks, Jamison, 53, has spent more time at Hopkins quizzing oncologists treating her husband than teaching residents in psychiatry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff | October 10, 1999
"Night Falls Fast," by Kay Redfield Jamison. Knopf. 432 pages. $25.So many people throughout time have died from suicide, written about it, tried to make sense of it. In this new book, Kay Redfield Jamison attacks this complex, emotionally charged topic without fear. She has created a single, fresh text that answers the question so many have agonized over for so long: Why?In a sweeping, authoritative look at suicide, laced with the compelling tales of those who died or nearly died at their own hands, including herself, Dr. Jamison exposes the truth: Suicide is not one isolated moment of madness for otherwise rational people, but mostly an impulsive act of a patient trying to end the awful pain of a psychiatric illness.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2001
When their office phones rang the other day, two Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers were expecting the routine. Instead, they heard the biggest news of their careers. Kay Redfield Jamison and Geraldine Seydoux were informed they'd each won one of the most prestigious grants in the country: the MacArthur Fellowship. The prize gives each researcher $500,000 over five years to use however she wants. "It was just ... completely out of the blue," said Jamison, a psychologist, teacher and writer on mental health.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 1999
The first comprehensive study of the rapidly growing number of emotionally disturbed people in the nation's jails and prisons has found that 283,800 inmates have severe mental illness, about 16 percent of the total jail population. The report confirms the belief of many state, local and federal experts that jails and prisons have become the nation's new mental hospitals.The study, released by the Justice Department yesterday, paints a grim statistical portrait, detailing how emotionally disturbed inmates tend to go through a revolving door from homelessness to incarceration and then back to the streets with little treatment.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.