Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKauai
IN THE NEWS

Kauai

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
TRAVEL
By Katherine McNaboe | July 12, 2009
Whether you're newlyweds looking to get away from it all, family looking for fun, or just want to relax and unwind, Kauai is so perfect it's almost unreal. Oldest of the Hawaiian islands, the "garden isle's" natural attractions include a canyon, waterfalls, wildlife refuge and botanical garden. It's also home to Hanalei Bay, a beach ranked this year as best in the U.S. 1 Relax at America's No. 1 beach : Kauai's Hanalei Bay is at the top of Stephen "Dr. Beach" Leatherman's 2009 list of the country's best beaches.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Katherine McNaboe | July 12, 2009
Whether you're newlyweds looking to get away from it all, family looking for fun, or just want to relax and unwind, Kauai is so perfect it's almost unreal. Oldest of the Hawaiian islands, the "garden isle's" natural attractions include a canyon, waterfalls, wildlife refuge and botanical garden. It's also home to Hanalei Bay, a beach ranked this year as best in the U.S. 1 Relax at America's No. 1 beach : Kauai's Hanalei Bay is at the top of Stephen "Dr. Beach" Leatherman's 2009 list of the country's best beaches.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
By RICARDO BACA and RICARDO BACA,THE DENVER POST | January 22, 2006
The canopy of Guatemala's rain forests is fiercely dense and pulsating with life, and the majestic Patagonian plains are otherworldly in their immense, shapeless stature. The Yucatan's endless sand highways running alongside the Caribbean are epic, unspoiled treasures, and the canyons - big and small - of Utah and Arizona are more than just national parks, they are natural history. They are art. As overwhelming as all that natural beauty is, none of it will prepare travelers for Kauai, the "Garden Isle" and the oldest of the Hawaiian Islands.
TRAVEL
By RICARDO BACA and RICARDO BACA,THE DENVER POST | January 22, 2006
The canopy of Guatemala's rain forests is fiercely dense and pulsating with life, and the majestic Patagonian plains are otherworldly in their immense, shapeless stature. The Yucatan's endless sand highways running alongside the Caribbean are epic, unspoiled treasures, and the canyons - big and small - of Utah and Arizona are more than just national parks, they are natural history. They are art. As overwhelming as all that natural beauty is, none of it will prepare travelers for Kauai, the "Garden Isle" and the oldest of the Hawaiian Islands.
NEWS
March 14, 2004
On March 6, 2004 WILLIAM H. HOFFMAN, SR., 94, of Kauai, Hawaii. Formerly of Baltimore.
NEWS
March 14, 2004
On February 5, 2004 ARNOLD J. HOFFMAN, MD, 69 of Kauai, Hawaii. Formerly of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | May 23, 1991
When 16-year-old Kauai Kahanamoku Mansur walks across the stage tonight to receive his diploma from Anne Arundel Community College, he will give hope to other students who want to choose the road less traveled.The Honolulu-born student is among the youngest to graduate from the college, which he entered at 14. He never set foot in a junior high or high school classroom.Before he became a community college student, his classroom consisted of a desk in his West Annapolis bedroom, a rigid schedule planned by his mother, Cheryl Mansur, and all the reading materials he could get his hands on. Occasionally, tutors were sought, but much of thework was based on a national home-school curriculum.
NEWS
September 15, 1992
It's taken a couple of record hurricanes, but the White House and federal disaster officials seem finally to have gotten their act together. President Bush had barely awakened the morning after Hurricane Iniki smashed into Kauai Friday when he declared the Hawaiian island a disaster area. Army and Navy units were already headed from nearby bases and, wonder of wonders, Federal Emergency Management Agency advance teams were on the island even before the storm struck.Washington's response to natural disasters like the major storms that hit South Florida last month and Kauai last week -- the sort of calamities state and local governments cannot handle by themselves -- should not have political implications.
TRAVEL
By Gayle Westmoreland and Gayle Westmoreland,Special to the Sun | June 25, 2000
A MEMORABLE PLACE Return to the Motherland As a black-history buff, I often wondered what might have happened to me had Marcus Garvey's "Return to Africa Movement" in the early 1900s succeeded. Just as Alex Haley searched for his "Roots" and inspired a generation of genealogy seekers, every human being must resolve questions that determine the essence of the soul. For me, I had to return to the place of my heritage, Africa, the Motherland. My trip was the culmination of a lifetime dream.
FEATURES
By Sheree Lipton and Sheree Lipton,Special to The Sun | December 4, 1994
The birds are back. The Hawaiian Monk Seals are back. The glamour hotels have already had elegant face lifts and in some cases, new management and new money have put up the bucks to bring Kauai back and make it even better -- a long way from the unexpected flagellation of Iniki, the dreaded hurricane that whipped through Kauai on Sept. 11, 1992.The sanctuary and beauty of this tiny ancient kingdom was never really destroyed -- this, after all, is no lava adolescent. Kauai has more than 60 million years of geological sculpturing under her verdant skirts.
NEWS
March 14, 2004
On March 6, 2004 WILLIAM H. HOFFMAN, SR., 94, of Kauai, Hawaii. Formerly of Baltimore.
NEWS
March 14, 2004
On February 5, 2004 ARNOLD J. HOFFMAN, MD, 69 of Kauai, Hawaii. Formerly of Baltimore.
TRAVEL
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 15, 2002
After kayaking 17 miles down Kauai's stunning Na Pali coast, every one of Cindy Chase's muscles hurt -- in her face. She and her paddling partner, Jamie Klein, had spent the entire day grinning. "We couldn't wipe the smiles off," she said. Cindy and Jamie are seasoned whitewater boaters. A death-defying plunge down experts-only rivers, like the upper Youghiogheny in Western Maryland, is routine to the Morgantown, W.Va., couple. But sea-kayaking the waters off Hawaii's oldest, wettest and most beautiful island was an entirely new thrill for them.
TRAVEL
By Gayle Westmoreland and Gayle Westmoreland,Special to the Sun | June 25, 2000
A MEMORABLE PLACE Return to the Motherland As a black-history buff, I often wondered what might have happened to me had Marcus Garvey's "Return to Africa Movement" in the early 1900s succeeded. Just as Alex Haley searched for his "Roots" and inspired a generation of genealogy seekers, every human being must resolve questions that determine the essence of the soul. For me, I had to return to the place of my heritage, Africa, the Motherland. My trip was the culmination of a lifetime dream.
FEATURES
By Sheree Lipton and Sheree Lipton,Special to The Sun | December 4, 1994
The birds are back. The Hawaiian Monk Seals are back. The glamour hotels have already had elegant face lifts and in some cases, new management and new money have put up the bucks to bring Kauai back and make it even better -- a long way from the unexpected flagellation of Iniki, the dreaded hurricane that whipped through Kauai on Sept. 11, 1992.The sanctuary and beauty of this tiny ancient kingdom was never really destroyed -- this, after all, is no lava adolescent. Kauai has more than 60 million years of geological sculpturing under her verdant skirts.
FEATURES
By Candyce H. Stapen and Candyce H. Stapen,Contributing Writer | September 12, 1993
The bougainvillea is back, and so are the sugar-cane fields, the fragrant hibiscus and the ferns feathering the roadsides of Kauai.The famed eucalyptus tunnel on Highway 50 also still impresses. None of the aged, towering trees of the landmark was felled by the winds of last September's Hurricane Iniki, a sign many locals interpret as confirming the spirit of Kauai, known as the Garden Isle. The staying power of this spot serves as a favorable omen for an island on its way to recovery.Ready for visitors to the island are all of Kauai's golf courses, many businesses and about 30 percent of the accommodations, including several major hotels.
FEATURES
By Candyce H. Stapen and Candyce H. Stapen,Contributing Writer | September 12, 1993
The bougainvillea is back, and so are the sugar-cane fields, the fragrant hibiscus and the ferns feathering the roadsides of Kauai.The famed eucalyptus tunnel on Highway 50 also still impresses. None of the aged, towering trees of the landmark was felled by the winds of last September's Hurricane Iniki, a sign many locals interpret as confirming the spirit of Kauai, known as the Garden Isle. The staying power of this spot serves as a favorable omen for an island on its way to recovery.Ready for visitors to the island are all of Kauai's golf courses, many businesses and about 30 percent of the accommodations, including several major hotels.
TRAVEL
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 15, 2002
After kayaking 17 miles down Kauai's stunning Na Pali coast, every one of Cindy Chase's muscles hurt -- in her face. She and her paddling partner, Jamie Klein, had spent the entire day grinning. "We couldn't wipe the smiles off," she said. Cindy and Jamie are seasoned whitewater boaters. A death-defying plunge down experts-only rivers, like the upper Youghiogheny in Western Maryland, is routine to the Morgantown, W.Va., couple. But sea-kayaking the waters off Hawaii's oldest, wettest and most beautiful island was an entirely new thrill for them.
NEWS
September 15, 1992
It's taken a couple of record hurricanes, but the White House and federal disaster officials seem finally to have gotten their act together. President Bush had barely awakened the morning after Hurricane Iniki smashed into Kauai Friday when he declared the Hawaiian island a disaster area. Army and Navy units were already headed from nearby bases and, wonder of wonders, Federal Emergency Management Agency advance teams were on the island even before the storm struck.Washington's response to natural disasters like the major storms that hit South Florida last month and Kauai last week -- the sort of calamities state and local governments cannot handle by themselves -- should not have political implications.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | May 23, 1991
When 16-year-old Kauai Kahanamoku Mansur walks across the stage tonight to receive his diploma from Anne Arundel Community College, he will give hope to other students who want to choose the road less traveled.The Honolulu-born student is among the youngest to graduate from the college, which he entered at 14. He never set foot in a junior high or high school classroom.Before he became a community college student, his classroom consisted of a desk in his West Annapolis bedroom, a rigid schedule planned by his mother, Cheryl Mansur, and all the reading materials he could get his hands on. Occasionally, tutors were sought, but much of thework was based on a national home-school curriculum.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.