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By Christine Fillat | January 3, 1992
KATZENSTEIN GALLERY729 E. Pratt St. "Experimental Images"Local educators Mary Jacque Benner and Jane Kelly Morais examine the possibilities of computer-generated imagery in this exhibit of recent works. An associate professor of fine art at Loyola College, Ms. Benner photographs cemetery monuments, then manipulates and paints the imagery with the computer, giving new life to an old and, perhaps, forgotten scene. Ms. Morais is an associate professor of art and the art gallery director at Catonsville Community College.
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NEWS
January 20, 2005
On Tuesday, January 18, 2005 ROSE RIVKIND, beloved wife of the late Harry Rivkind, devoted mother of Martin "Marty" Katzenstein of Sarasota, FL and late Arnold Rivkind, dear mother-in-law of Cathy Katzenstein and Stephanie Rivkind. Loving grandmother of Erica and Sean O'Brien, Joseph Katzenstein, Dustin Rivkind, Victoria Rivkind, Alex Rivkind, David and Melissa Wilcox, Ashlee Wilcox, Laura Wilcox and Eric Wilcox. Also survived by two loving great-grandchildren Services at SOL LEVINSON AND BROS, INC, 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Friday, January 21 at 11 A.M. Interment Chevra Ahavas Chesed, Inc., Randallstown.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 24, 1992
AMONG AREA SHOWS, sculptors David Yocum and Nicole Fall at Katzenstein make a happy combination, for each is outrageous in an idiosyncratic way. Yocum's pieces combine ceramic, neon, and sometimes acrylic that looks like thick plates of glass, into pieces that have some elements of landscape and also appear futuristic. In some ways they're awful, but they do exert a definite fascination; "Blue Window" looks like a bathroom basin supporting a super large bar of soap with a window in it.Fall's metal sculptures resemble some sort of sea creature mutants that have struggled to shore and are waiting for anything to love them.
NEWS
September 2, 2004
On Tuesday, August 31, 2004, ALLYNE ALPER (nee Katzenstein), wife of the late Norman Alper, mother of Marjorie Schultz of Houston, TX and Rabbi Robert A. Alper (Sherri) of East Dorset, VT., sister of the late Rabbie Martin E. Katzenstein. Grandmother of Deborah E. Fick, Kurt M. Schultz, Arthur H. Schultz, II, Zachary S. Alper, Jessica R. Alper, Dr. Jonathan Kay and Linda Rosen. Special friend of Ted Kolb. Daughter of the late Edgar and Etta (nee Lewensohn) Katzenstein Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS.
NEWS
February 27, 1991
Dr. Lawrence Katzenstein, a dermatologist whose early years as a physician were spent in Baltimore, died of pneumonia Feb. 15 at a hospital in Wilmington, Del. He was 82.Dr. Katzenstein, who lived in Bellevue, Del., was a former chief of dermatology at two Wilmington hospitals. He was a member of several professional societies, including the American Academy of Dermatology.He was a 1932 graduate of the University of Virginia and a 1936 graduate of the University of Maryland Medical School.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 25, 1992
Edda Jakab's charcoal still life drawings at the Katzenstein Gallery are not as pretty as her work in color that I've seen elsewhere, but they have a lot more going for them in other ways. They have definite weight, both physically -- the objects look solid -- and in the fact that there is some emotional content to them, too.A twisted cloth, spiky branches, deep shadows reflect a real and particular character informing these works that one doesn't encounter in the artist's more decorative and immediately appealing pictures.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | December 10, 1992
At the end of the year, Katzenstein Gallery on Pratt Street wil become the latest downtown gallery to suspend regular art shows, owner Stanley Katzenstein said this week.The art and framing gallery, which also has a Lutherville location, will remain open at 729 E. Pratt St., but without the regular, curated monthly shows inaugurated with the move to the present location six years ago.Like other gallery owners, Mr. Katzenstein blamed the economy for his decision."It was financially draining" to do shows, he said.
NEWS
September 2, 2004
On Tuesday, August 31, 2004, ALLYNE ALPER (nee Katzenstein), wife of the late Norman Alper, mother of Marjorie Schultz of Houston, TX and Rabbi Robert A. Alper (Sherri) of East Dorset, VT., sister of the late Rabbie Martin E. Katzenstein. Grandmother of Deborah E. Fick, Kurt M. Schultz, Arthur H. Schultz, II, Zachary S. Alper, Jessica R. Alper, Dr. Jonathan Kay and Linda Rosen. Special friend of Ted Kolb. Daughter of the late Edgar and Etta (nee Lewensohn) Katzenstein Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS.
NEWS
January 20, 2005
On Tuesday, January 18, 2005 ROSE RIVKIND, beloved wife of the late Harry Rivkind, devoted mother of Martin "Marty" Katzenstein of Sarasota, FL and late Arnold Rivkind, dear mother-in-law of Cathy Katzenstein and Stephanie Rivkind. Loving grandmother of Erica and Sean O'Brien, Joseph Katzenstein, Dustin Rivkind, Victoria Rivkind, Alex Rivkind, David and Melissa Wilcox, Ashlee Wilcox, Laura Wilcox and Eric Wilcox. Also survived by two loving great-grandchildren Services at SOL LEVINSON AND BROS, INC, 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Friday, January 21 at 11 A.M. Interment Chevra Ahavas Chesed, Inc., Randallstown.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 25, 1992
Edda Jakab's charcoal still life drawings at the Katzenstein Gallery are not as pretty as her work in color that I've seen elsewhere, but they have a lot more going for them in other ways. They have definite weight, both physically -- the objects look solid -- and in the fact that there is some emotional content to them, too.A twisted cloth, spiky branches, deep shadows reflect a real and particular character informing these works that one doesn't encounter in the artist's more decorative and immediately appealing pictures.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1999
Stanley Katzenstein, a downtown picture-framing business owner, died Sunday of cancer at his Mount Washington home. He was 59. Mr. Katzenstein was the second generation of his family to run Ludwig Katzenstein, a company founded in 1940 by his father at Hopkins Place and Pratt Street. About 15 years ago, the shop moved to Scarlett Place on East Pratt Street, and the family opened a branch in Lutherville. "It seemed there wasn't an office in downtown Baltimore that didn't have a picture they framed," said James L. Pierce, owner of a Charles Village framing studio.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | December 10, 1992
At the end of the year, Katzenstein Gallery on Pratt Street wil become the latest downtown gallery to suspend regular art shows, owner Stanley Katzenstein said this week.The art and framing gallery, which also has a Lutherville location, will remain open at 729 E. Pratt St., but without the regular, curated monthly shows inaugurated with the move to the present location six years ago.Like other gallery owners, Mr. Katzenstein blamed the economy for his decision."It was financially draining" to do shows, he said.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 25, 1992
Edda Jakab's charcoal still life drawings at the Katzenstein Gallery are not as pretty as her work in color that I've seen elsewhere, but they have a lot more going for them in other ways. They have definite weight, both physically -- the objects look solid -- and in the fact that there is some emotional content to them, too.A twisted cloth, spiky branches, deep shadows reflect a real and particular character informing these works that one doesn't encounter in the artist's more decorative and immediately appealing pictures.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | March 25, 1992
Edda Jakab's charcoal still life drawings at the Katzenstein Gallery are not as pretty as her work in color that I've seen elsewhere, but they have a lot more going for them in other ways. They have definite weight, both physically -- the objects look solid -- and in the fact that there is some emotional content to them, too.A twisted cloth, spiky branches, deep shadows reflect a real and particular character informing these works that one doesn't encounter in the artist's more decorative and immediately appealing pictures.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | February 24, 1992
AMONG AREA SHOWS, sculptors David Yocum and Nicole Fall at Katzenstein make a happy combination, for each is outrageous in an idiosyncratic way. Yocum's pieces combine ceramic, neon, and sometimes acrylic that looks like thick plates of glass, into pieces that have some elements of landscape and also appear futuristic. In some ways they're awful, but they do exert a definite fascination; "Blue Window" looks like a bathroom basin supporting a super large bar of soap with a window in it.Fall's metal sculptures resemble some sort of sea creature mutants that have struggled to shore and are waiting for anything to love them.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | January 9, 1992
Although computers are not about to displace the paintbrush in most artists' studios, a healthy number of artists are exploring how computer technology can be harnessed in the service of the muse.A two-artist exhibit at the Katzenstein Gallery, "Experimental Images," displays color copy and computer transfers printed on handmade paper by Jane Kelly Morais and computer manipulations by Mary Jacque Benner.Morais, who directs the art gallery and teaches art at Catonsville Community College, spends a lot of time at both the Xerox machine and computer screen.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | July 9, 1991
Sara Glik and Stephanie Sdanowich, whose works form the present show at the Katzenstein Gallery (through July 31), are not collaborators, but both work in photography. Both also have potential, though they have some distance to go before fully realizing it.Glik's photographs are mostly black and white but occasionally hand-colored and some employ infrared film. Her images here are primarily of nudes and abandoned cars, with the latter (though fewer in number) more consistently successful.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 20, 1991
Going to a group show of works by local sculptors has become a little like going to a neighborhood cocktail party. One can expect to see the old familiar faces, and one feels quite comfortable among them. But one doesn't always have something new to say to -- or in this case, about -- them.At the Gatsby Design Gallery (through June) are works by Paul Glasgow, Greg Moring, Gagik Aroutiunian and Jim Paulsen. At "En Plein Air," the annual summer show at Green Spring Station (through Sept. 7)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine Fillat | January 3, 1992
KATZENSTEIN GALLERY729 E. Pratt St. "Experimental Images"Local educators Mary Jacque Benner and Jane Kelly Morais examine the possibilities of computer-generated imagery in this exhibit of recent works. An associate professor of fine art at Loyola College, Ms. Benner photographs cemetery monuments, then manipulates and paints the imagery with the computer, giving new life to an old and, perhaps, forgotten scene. Ms. Morais is an associate professor of art and the art gallery director at Catonsville Community College.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | July 9, 1991
Sara Glik and Stephanie Sdanowich, whose works form the present show at the Katzenstein Gallery (through July 31), are not collaborators, but both work in photography. Both also have potential, though they have some distance to go before fully realizing it.Glik's photographs are mostly black and white but occasionally hand-colored and some employ infrared film. Her images here are primarily of nudes and abandoned cars, with the latter (though fewer in number) more consistently successful.
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