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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Here's what the new Baltimore Style magazine looks like. "It's got a new logo, a fresh design - and Katie O'Malley on the cover," editor-in-chief Joe Sugarman said in an email to The Sun. "Our fashion editor, Suzin Boddiford, somehow convinced the first lady to model the latest spring fashions in a 10-page fashion shoot. We've got an interview with her in there, too. I have to say, she looks like a real model. People will be stunned. " #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
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NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley and his wife, Katie, are actively house shopping in northern Baltimore and plan to "repatria te " to the city when his term ends. O'Malley said Thursday his youngest son has already switched to a Baltimore school and that the family intends to move to a home near his wife's parents and other family once they leave Annapolis early next year. The house search in Baltimore comes as the two-term Democrat  weighs his future beyond the Sta te House, including a possible bid for the Whi te House in 2016.
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NEWS
By Katie O'Malley | May 24, 2011
This week, May 23-27, Maryland recognizes our second annual Bullying Awareness and Prevention Week. Despite the commonly held perceptions, when it comes to bullying, everyone is a victim, from our schools to our communities. The message is simple: A child's mental health is just as important as their physical health. Last year, we teamed up with the Maryland State Department of Education to declare Bullying Prevention and Awareness Week in May to encourage schools and communities across the state to engage students in events to stress nontolerance toward bullying.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
What was the hardest lesson you've learned so far? "That kids grow up too fast. " What do you do to relax? "Go to the gym. " Your (other) dream job would be ... "Interior designer or kindergarten teacher. " What's on your playlist? "Citizen Cope, U2 and The Great Gatsby soundtrack. " What is your favorite book? "Anything historical. " What's your favorite vacation destination? "The beach anywhere!"
NEWS
By Liz Atwood | August 3, 2008
With her job as a Baltimore District Court judge and her duties as Maryland's first lady and mother of four, Katie O'Malley says it's a challenge to find time to read. "There are so many [books] and so little time," she sighs. Usually, she squeezes her reading in while riding in the car. Her tastes are diverse, but lately she's been reading books that have a message of hope in face of adversity. "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee "As most kids, I had to read it in high school. ... The book had so much meaning for me because the moral hero of the book, Atticus Finch, reminded me of my father, Joe Curran."
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
School districts across Maryland are being asked this week to engage in discussions and activities addressing the issue of school bullying after several recent high-profile cases in Baltimore and the nation. Maryland first lady Katie O'Malley and state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick have designated May 24-28 as Bullying Awareness and Prevention Week. O'Malley, along with state education officials, will kick off the week Monday morning with a visit to Pikesville Middle School.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
Catherine Curran O'Malley grew up with a swirl of history at her doorstep. Daughter of a powerful Maryland senator, her dad's positions led white supremacists to picket her home. The neighborhood priest once denounced him from the pulpit. Young Katie didn't always understand why her family - especially her father, J. Joseph Curran Jr. - was the target of vitriol. "I knew there was this hatred out there," O'Malley, 49, said. "I knew whatever he was doing was the right thing. " Now in her sixth year as Maryland's first lady, Katie O'Malley credits her upbringing - watching her father grapple with some of the most difficult issues in the 1960s and 1970s - for her dedication to another cause stirring outrage from many, including the family's Catholic church: legalizing same-sex marriage.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
The Christ Child Society of Baltimore was formed just a few months ago, but this organization, a chapter of the National Christ Child Society, has hit the ground running. Already, the group has donated books and volunteer hours at many organizations, and established a partnership with Armistead Gardens Elementary and Middle School. On March 21, Maryland first lady Katie O'Malley will visit the Baltimore public school for a program on bullying arranged by the organization. The school already has programs to combat bullying, said Cathleen White, who revived the Baltimore branch of the Christ Child Society and planned O'Malley's visit.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2010
Maryland first lady Katie O'Malley made an early-morning visit Monday to Pikesville Middle School, where she praised school leaders and students for serving as a model for schools struggling to address bullying. O'Malley visited the middle school to launch Bullying Awareness and Prevention Week in the state. "Bullies are mean, they're intimidating and they need to be confronted," O'Malley said. During a discussion with a group of Pikesville students, O'Malley used recent high-profile incidents to illustrate the seriousness of the issue, including the suicide of a Massachusetts teen who was bullied.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | December 5, 1999
Monday morning, and another spinning week of the Power Mom derby begins for Baltimore County prosecutor Katie O'Malley. The alarm sounds the starting bell at 6 a.m. Time to gather homework, breakfast, car keys, school lunches, the briefcase. Then, drop off the kids at school, the nanny's. Arrive at the courthouse. Put away criminals the whole day through. Run a few miles. Drive home to give the kids dinner, a bath and a book at bedtime, while all along the telephone rings like a fire alarm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Here's what the new Baltimore Style magazine looks like. "It's got a new logo, a fresh design - and Katie O'Malley on the cover," editor-in-chief Joe Sugarman said in an email to The Sun. "Our fashion editor, Suzin Boddiford, somehow convinced the first lady to model the latest spring fashions in a 10-page fashion shoot. We've got an interview with her in there, too. I have to say, she looks like a real model. People will be stunned. " #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
The mourners followed the coffin of 15-year-old Grace McComas out of the church and into the morning sunlight of a beautiful Easter season. Christine McComas carried her child's stuffed toy in the crook of her arm. Grief made her look almost wistful. As Grace's parents and her three sisters left the crowded St. Michael's Catholic Church in Mount Airy a year ago, they weren't thinking that their journey of grief would take them to Annapolis. But the determination of that grief-stricken mother to tell her daughter's story - powered by a Ravens player, Maryland's first lady and a state legislator - resulted in "Grace's Law," which Gov. Martin O'Malley is scheduled to sign Thursday.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
The Christ Child Society of Baltimore was formed just a few months ago, but this organization, a chapter of the National Christ Child Society, has hit the ground running. Already, the group has donated books and volunteer hours at many organizations, and established a partnership with Armistead Gardens Elementary and Middle School. On March 21, Maryland first lady Katie O'Malley will visit the Baltimore public school for a program on bullying arranged by the organization. The school already has programs to combat bullying, said Cathleen White, who revived the Baltimore branch of the Christ Child Society and planned O'Malley's visit.
EXPLORE
By Calvin Ball | March 14, 2013
In Howard County, we are determined to provide an open forum of discussion on bullying so that no teen has to suffer in silence. With the Council's passage of Resolution 16-2013 designating Voices for Change Youth Coalition as the designated organization to facilitate discussion among youth coupled with the county's anti-bullying task force, we are already beginning to see progress.  For those not already aware, the students members of Voices for...
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies, with a high temperature near 45 degrees. Tonight's forecast calls for mostly clear skies and a low temperature around 30 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic map for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM THE WEEKEND... Girl, 13, found dead in Darley Park section of Baltimore : A 13-year-old girl was found slain Sunday evening in the Darley Park neighborhood of northeast Baltimore, police reported.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
Catherine Curran O'Malley grew up with a swirl of history at her doorstep. Daughter of a powerful Maryland senator, her dad's positions led white supremacists to picket her home. The neighborhood priest once denounced him from the pulpit. Young Katie didn't always understand why her family - especially her father, J. Joseph Curran Jr. - was the target of vitriol. "I knew there was this hatred out there," O'Malley, 49, said. "I knew whatever he was doing was the right thing. " Now in her sixth year as Maryland's first lady, Katie O'Malley credits her upbringing - watching her father grapple with some of the most difficult issues in the 1960s and 1970s - for her dedication to another cause stirring outrage from many, including the family's Catholic church: legalizing same-sex marriage.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2002
Katie O'Malley, Baltimore District court judge and wife of the mayor, says their 11-year-old daughter Grace is as much to blame as anyone. The oldest of their children put "a new baby" on her Christmas wish list last December. "I told her definitely no," O'Malley says now with a grin. "She jinxed me. We found out we were pregnant right after we gave Will's crib away." It's always "we" and never "I" when she talks about her pregnancy.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | January 29, 2012
Pastors and elected officials are set to rally in Annapolis against same-sex marriage Monday evening, aiming to make a strong statement against the bill in advance of this week's senate hearing on the bill. The event is being organized by the Maryland Marriage Alliance, a new coalition of mostly faith leaders who came together this year to combat the marriage bill. Supports of same-sex marriage also formed a new group called Marylanders for Marriage Equality.  One opponent, Charles Lollar, said that if the bill passes it could "further demise morality and tear away at the fundamental framework" of the state and country," according to a statement.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2012
Del. Heather Mizeur choked back tears as she described losing her best friend after she told him she was gay. Del. Emmett C. Burns spoke for the first time about being propositioned by men when he was a child. Another speaker, a 38-year-old Pikesville man, said he dreams of attending the marriage of his two moms. Friday's House of Delegates hearing on Gov. Martin O'Malley's bill to legalize same-sex marriage was packed with deeply personal anecdotes and arguments, as advocates and opponents sought to make the best possible cases for their sides.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
More than 300 protesters filled a courtyard in front of the State House in Annapolis on Monday evening, listening to ministers and chanting slogans in opposition to a same-sex marriage bill introduced by Gov. Martin O'Malley. "We ask the government to fix the problems we already have, not create new ones," said the Rev. Michael DeAscanis, a Roman Catholic priest in St. Agnes and St. William of York Parish in Baltimore. The crowd roared with approval and broke into a chant directed at state lawmakers: "Do your job!
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