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By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - For 10 minutes, the reporters behaved. Here to interview Katie Holmes and Michael Caine, they asked dutiful questions about their new film, Batman Begins. Holmes offered the usual pat answers. "It was such a thrill to be a part of this cast," she gushed. "It was great working with Christian [Bale, as Batman]. He's such a professional and very dedicated." Oh, tell us more! Everyone, of course, really wanted to ask Holmes about her boyfriend, mega-star Tom Cruise, who has not exactly been shy about declaring his love for her. But would Holmes explode at such questions and storm out of the room?
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | September 1, 2006
Landover -- You tune in to the final preseason game and really hope for something crazy to make it worth your while. And because the Ravens were facing the Redskins, there was actually a pretty good chance at some preseason drama. Maybe Dan Snyder's latest signee, Tom Cruise, would make his first appearance in uniform ... Maybe Clinton Portis would come dressed as Katie Holmes ... And maybe, just maybe, the Ravens' first-team offense could find the end zone again ... I know, the last option seemed like Mission Impossible IV, but it happened all right, which was just enough to inject a pinch of intrigue into the Ravens' preseason finale and a touch of hope into the regular-season opener.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 24, 2006
Smoking and sanctimony are equally skewered in Thank You for Smoking, a barbed satire from writer-director Jason Reitman that also aims squarely at journalists, politicians, spin-doctors, grade-school career days and just about every other target in sight. And that's where the film's major flaw lies. Even while laughing at all the well-deserved jibes, one can't help but wonder where Reitman's sympathies rest. Everything gets skewered in Thank You for Smoking, leaving behind a lot of deflated egos and pricked sensibilities, but little else.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 24, 2006
Smoking and sanctimony are equally skewered in Thank You for Smoking, a barbed satire from writer-director Jason Reitman that also aims squarely at journalists, politicians, spin-doctors, grade-school career days and just about every other target in sight. And that's where the film's major flaw lies. Even while laughing at all the well-deserved jibes, one can't help but wonder where Reitman's sympathies rest. Everything gets skewered in Thank You for Smoking, leaving behind a lot of deflated egos and pricked sensibilities, but little else.
FEATURES
By Deborah Hornblow and Deborah Hornblow,HARTFORD COURANT | September 24, 2004
Combining elements of The Princess Diaries and the life and times of Chelsea Clinton with a whiff of Audrey Hepburn style, First Daughter is an intimate peek at a president's only child (Katie Holmes), a young woman who longs to be just like everybody else. Mandy Moore's first kid in this year's Chasing Liberty solves the problem by going AWOL for a few days. Holmes' Samantha Mackenzie chooses the less rebellious path of attending college in California, where her one great aspiration is to blend in. But from the moment Sam arrives at the university, to the tune of the school band's "Hail to the Chief," she knows she cannot hope to be treated as an ordinary student.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Henerson and Evan Henerson,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | October 30, 2003
It takes a few beats staring at the screen -- or the poster -- before the "I know her" kicks in. That really is Katie Holmes underneath the dyed frosted hair, the pigtails, the SoHo chic wardrobe, the boots and the tattoos. Right, that Katie Holmes: the baby-faced Dawson's Creek ingenue with the tomboy name (Joey Potter) and the Ivory soap image. It's a very different Holmes who is front and center in the family drama Pieces of April, opening tomorrow, having noisy sex with her boyfriend and clumsily trying to dress an uncooperative turkey.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 31, 2003
Pieces of April has a shred of originality that keeps its humor prickly and its drama sharp for an hour and 21 minutes. It's the Thanksgiving Day fable of a bohemian New York City girl named April (Katie Holmes) and her attempt to cook a turkey for her suburban family in her grungy Lower East Side digs. April has never gotten along with her mother (Patricia Clarkson), who happens to be riddled with cancer -- a fact that might have made the whole movie mawkish and sickly sweet. Luckily, Clarkson and writer-director Peter Hedges have the wit to create a thorny, sometimes harshly playful character who is full of surprises, whether telling her smug "good" daughter (Alison Pill)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2003
A bunch of local folks are back in town after having lots of fun in the sun a week ago. And we're not talking Florida. We mean Utah. The Sundance Film Festival, to be exact. "The weather was twice as warm in Park City as it was in Baltimore," notes Karen Bokram. Not that she minded. The sunny 40-something-degree climate made for great skiing and celebrity sighting. More from the Girls' Life publisher/editor in a bit. Meanwhile, Maryland Film Festival founder/director Jed Dietz was working the fest, along with Maryland Film Office chief Jack Gerbes.
FEATURES
October 30, 2004
One-eyed Mike Wazowski and James P. "Sulley" Sullivan are professional scarers, with the screams they generate powering Monsteropolis. They punch the clock, scare some humans, go home. It's a living. But, when a little human girl follows the (to her) teddy-bearish Sulley back to his world, and a co-worker's envy boils over, workplace turmoil ensues. Monsters, Inc. (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) features the voices of Billy Crystal and John Goodman. ABC. At a glance Brokedown Palace (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WUTB, Channel 24)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Dollar and By Steve Dollar,Newsday | January 20, 2005
A symbol of all-American hot-shot virility in adventures such as The Right Stuff and romantic capers such as The Big Easy, Dennis Quaid has always been underappreciated as an actor, as someone with more going on than dimpled cheeks and the lady-killer charm of a big, flashy grin. Of late, he's acquired some true gravitas. He outlasted a much publicized divorce from former wife Meg Ryan in 2001 and bounced right back, delivering meaty portrayals in Oscar-happy projects such as Traffic. His batting average isn't consistent (Flight of the Phoenix, yikes!
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. - For 10 minutes, the reporters behaved. Here to interview Katie Holmes and Michael Caine, they asked dutiful questions about their new film, Batman Begins. Holmes offered the usual pat answers. "It was such a thrill to be a part of this cast," she gushed. "It was great working with Christian [Bale, as Batman]. He's such a professional and very dedicated." Oh, tell us more! Everyone, of course, really wanted to ask Holmes about her boyfriend, mega-star Tom Cruise, who has not exactly been shy about declaring his love for her. But would Holmes explode at such questions and storm out of the room?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Dollar and By Steve Dollar,Newsday | January 20, 2005
A symbol of all-American hot-shot virility in adventures such as The Right Stuff and romantic capers such as The Big Easy, Dennis Quaid has always been underappreciated as an actor, as someone with more going on than dimpled cheeks and the lady-killer charm of a big, flashy grin. Of late, he's acquired some true gravitas. He outlasted a much publicized divorce from former wife Meg Ryan in 2001 and bounced right back, delivering meaty portrayals in Oscar-happy projects such as Traffic. His batting average isn't consistent (Flight of the Phoenix, yikes!
FEATURES
October 30, 2004
One-eyed Mike Wazowski and James P. "Sulley" Sullivan are professional scarers, with the screams they generate powering Monsteropolis. They punch the clock, scare some humans, go home. It's a living. But, when a little human girl follows the (to her) teddy-bearish Sulley back to his world, and a co-worker's envy boils over, workplace turmoil ensues. Monsters, Inc. (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) features the voices of Billy Crystal and John Goodman. ABC. At a glance Brokedown Palace (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WUTB, Channel 24)
FEATURES
By Deborah Hornblow and Deborah Hornblow,HARTFORD COURANT | September 24, 2004
Combining elements of The Princess Diaries and the life and times of Chelsea Clinton with a whiff of Audrey Hepburn style, First Daughter is an intimate peek at a president's only child (Katie Holmes), a young woman who longs to be just like everybody else. Mandy Moore's first kid in this year's Chasing Liberty solves the problem by going AWOL for a few days. Holmes' Samantha Mackenzie chooses the less rebellious path of attending college in California, where her one great aspiration is to blend in. But from the moment Sam arrives at the university, to the tune of the school band's "Hail to the Chief," she knows she cannot hope to be treated as an ordinary student.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 31, 2003
Pieces of April has a shred of originality that keeps its humor prickly and its drama sharp for an hour and 21 minutes. It's the Thanksgiving Day fable of a bohemian New York City girl named April (Katie Holmes) and her attempt to cook a turkey for her suburban family in her grungy Lower East Side digs. April has never gotten along with her mother (Patricia Clarkson), who happens to be riddled with cancer -- a fact that might have made the whole movie mawkish and sickly sweet. Luckily, Clarkson and writer-director Peter Hedges have the wit to create a thorny, sometimes harshly playful character who is full of surprises, whether telling her smug "good" daughter (Alison Pill)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Henerson and Evan Henerson,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | October 30, 2003
It takes a few beats staring at the screen -- or the poster -- before the "I know her" kicks in. That really is Katie Holmes underneath the dyed frosted hair, the pigtails, the SoHo chic wardrobe, the boots and the tattoos. Right, that Katie Holmes: the baby-faced Dawson's Creek ingenue with the tomboy name (Joey Potter) and the Ivory soap image. It's a very different Holmes who is front and center in the family drama Pieces of April, opening tomorrow, having noisy sex with her boyfriend and clumsily trying to dress an uncooperative turkey.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
Unbeaten North Carroll built a three-goal lead, then had to hold on in the final eight minutes as host Westminster charged back into contention before losing, 3-2, last night.The victory gave No. 4-ranked North Carroll (11-0) its first victory over Westminster (8-5) since 1993 and enabled the Panthers to clinch their first Carroll County title since 1994.North Carroll is 6-0 county, 7-0 in the Central Maryland XTC Conference; Westminster is 3-2, 6-1. The two teams will close their regular seasons tomorrow (4 p.m.)
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | September 1, 2006
Landover -- You tune in to the final preseason game and really hope for something crazy to make it worth your while. And because the Ravens were facing the Redskins, there was actually a pretty good chance at some preseason drama. Maybe Dan Snyder's latest signee, Tom Cruise, would make his first appearance in uniform ... Maybe Clinton Portis would come dressed as Katie Holmes ... And maybe, just maybe, the Ravens' first-team offense could find the end zone again ... I know, the last option seemed like Mission Impossible IV, but it happened all right, which was just enough to inject a pinch of intrigue into the Ravens' preseason finale and a touch of hope into the regular-season opener.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2003
A bunch of local folks are back in town after having lots of fun in the sun a week ago. And we're not talking Florida. We mean Utah. The Sundance Film Festival, to be exact. "The weather was twice as warm in Park City as it was in Baltimore," notes Karen Bokram. Not that she minded. The sunny 40-something-degree climate made for great skiing and celebrity sighting. More from the Girls' Life publisher/editor in a bit. Meanwhile, Maryland Film Festival founder/director Jed Dietz was working the fest, along with Maryland Film Office chief Jack Gerbes.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
Unbeaten North Carroll built a three-goal lead, then had to hold on in the final eight minutes as host Westminster charged back into contention before losing, 3-2, last night.The victory gave No. 4-ranked North Carroll (11-0) its first victory over Westminster (8-5) since 1993 and enabled the Panthers to clinch their first Carroll County title since 1994.North Carroll is 6-0 county, 7-0 in the Central Maryland XTC Conference; Westminster is 3-2, 6-1. The two teams will close their regular seasons tomorrow (4 p.m.)
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