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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The theater scene in Washington during this frigid winter has been pretty hot. The latest example is "Mother Courage and Her Children," the classic Bertolt Brecht play in a potent revival at Arena Stage starring Kathleen Turner. Director Molly Smith, who guides this atmospheric, in-the-round production with a sure hand, has said she wanted to remind people of the "Her Children" in the title so that Brecht's searing anti-war, anti-hypocrisy sentiments are not the only take-homes. That goal has been realized, thanks to Turner's rich portrayal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The theater scene in Washington during this frigid winter has been pretty hot. The latest example is "Mother Courage and Her Children," the classic Bertolt Brecht play in a potent revival at Arena Stage starring Kathleen Turner. Director Molly Smith, who guides this atmospheric, in-the-round production with a sure hand, has said she wanted to remind people of the "Her Children" in the title so that Brecht's searing anti-war, anti-hypocrisy sentiments are not the only take-homes. That goal has been realized, thanks to Turner's rich portrayal.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | July 26, 1991
WHAT THIS HOT summer movie season needs and now has is a good, old-fashioned private eye film starring Kathleen Turner as the detective.The movie is ''V.I. Warshawski,'' which is based on the mystery novels written by Sara Paretsky.In the film, Turner is Warshawski, a private eye who talks tough and when she needs to, dirty. She's a stunner in many ways. She is a physical stunner when it comes to dealing with her enemies, and she is a visual stunner when she is just moving about.She may be adept in the martial arts department, but she also likes to dress.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2011
George and Martha, America's first couple of dysfunction, are back onstage, biting and scratching and spitting their way to the truth in "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf. " As usual, they take no prisoners. These warring spouses come to life with devastating force in the Steppenwolf Theatre Company production of Edward Albee's searing play, presented by Arena Stage as part of a comprehensive, two-month Albee festival. When the brilliant revival of "Virginia Woolf" with Kathleen Turner and Bill Irwin appeared on Broadway in 2005 (it played the Kennedy Center a couple of years later)
FEATURES
By Marjorie Miller and Marjorie Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 10, 2000
LONDON -- Let's cut to the chase. A lot of women in their 40s will not undress in front of a mirror. Some stay married so they'll never have to take their clothes off in front of another man. And then there is Kathleen Turner, who is making her West End debut as the middle-aged Mrs. Robinson -- in the nude. True, she is only naked for a minute and she is illuminated by a soft backlight, the stage equivalent of an airbrush, if there is one. She is in great shape and a stunning heir to the role seared into a generation's memory by Anne Bancroft in the 1967 film of the same name, "The Graduate."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 11, 1993
She came, she saw, she sort of conquered.They came, they saw, they sort of worshiped.That's the way it was at the Senator Theatre when actress Kathleen Turner appeared Wednesday night before a crowd of 800 to discuss her new film "House of Cards," her career and her nipples.Yes, her nipples.Question from the audience: "Were those your real nipples in 'Crimes of Passion'?"Audience: Gasp!Turner: "Yes, they were, honey."Audience: Laughter.Questioner: "You have the best breasts of anybody."Turner: "Thank you but -- we can stop there."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 2, 1993
Kathleen Turner will star in John Waters' new film "Serial Mom," which will begin shooting here April 12.Waters, with a mordant giggle, describes the film as "A true-crime parody about a sweet, lovable, serial killer who could be your own mother." Turner has the title role and her daughter will be played by Waters' regular Rikki Lake, though other cast members have not yet been set.Turner, a powerhouse blond who leapt to instant fame with "Body Heat," has forged a mainstream career with such films as "The War of the Roses" and "Romancing the Stone."
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 15, 1993
Kathleen Turner may or may not win an Oscar for her performance in John Waters' "Serial Mom," but she certainly deserves one for her performance at a Thursday press conference on the set of the movie in Towson.Radiant, ebullient, blazing with charisma and wit, Turner dominated a panel of actors and executives, including Waters himself, and did such a good job of it and kept everybody so royally entertained, nobody seemed to mind.Dressed for the part of a conventional Everymom who just happens to kill people -- in a shapeless beige house dress and espadrilles -- she looked so suburban you wanted to invite her to a Tupperware party, that is if today weren't her car pool day. But Turner was so busy imitating the best parts of Katharine Hepburn, Tallulah Bankhead and Elizabeth Taylor, and so forcefully being the life of the party -- any party, all parties -- that most in attendance were more likely to ask for an autograph.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by J. Wynn Rousuck and Story by J. Wynn Rousuck,sun staff | November 5, 2000
It's a voice with an accent that falls somewhere between the American heartland and London's West End. Or is it the Deep South and sunny Spain? In an era when cigarettes are social poison, this voice is unadulterated nicotine -- a sound so low and sultry, it could singe the phone wires. And then there's the vocabulary. "Extraordinarily" pops up more than once. So does "exhilarating." No understatement here, thank you. The voice is so distinctive it couldn't belong to anyone but Kathleen Turner -- unless, of course, it belonged to Tallulah Bankhead.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 5, 2001
The hit London stage version of The Graduate, starring Kathleen Turner as uninhibited Mrs. Robinson, will begin a three-city pre-Broadway tour at the Mechanic Theatre in January. Turner will re-create the role she originated last spring on the West End, creating a sensation in a brief scene in which she bares all. The show had the largest opening advance ticket sale of any play in West End history. The stage play is directed and adapted by Terry Johnson from the screenplay by Calder Willingham and Buck Henry, and the Charles Webb novel that inspired the 1967 movie.
NEWS
November 17, 2004
On November 15, 2004, JAMES E., JR., beloved husband of Joan W. Turner (nee Weyprecht); devoted father of Julia M. Mc Elwee, Laura T. Wedekind, Andrew K. Turner and Amy T. Orr; dear brother of William J. and Lawrence Turner, Patricia Ruff and Kathleen Turner. Also survived by nine grandchildren. Friends may call at the Sterling-Ashton-Schwab Funeral Home, Inc., 736 Edmondson Ave., Catonsville, (one-half mile west of Beltway exit 14), on Thursday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Mark Chapel on Friday at 10 A.M. Interment in New Cathedral Cemetery.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 5, 2001
The hit London stage version of The Graduate, starring Kathleen Turner as uninhibited Mrs. Robinson, will begin a three-city pre-Broadway tour at the Mechanic Theatre in January. Turner will re-create the role she originated last spring on the West End, creating a sensation in a brief scene in which she bares all. The show had the largest opening advance ticket sale of any play in West End history. The stage play is directed and adapted by Terry Johnson from the screenplay by Calder Willingham and Buck Henry, and the Charles Webb novel that inspired the 1967 movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by J. Wynn Rousuck and Story by J. Wynn Rousuck,sun staff | November 5, 2000
It's a voice with an accent that falls somewhere between the American heartland and London's West End. Or is it the Deep South and sunny Spain? In an era when cigarettes are social poison, this voice is unadulterated nicotine -- a sound so low and sultry, it could singe the phone wires. And then there's the vocabulary. "Extraordinarily" pops up more than once. So does "exhilarating." No understatement here, thank you. The voice is so distinctive it couldn't belong to anyone but Kathleen Turner -- unless, of course, it belonged to Tallulah Bankhead.
FEATURES
By Marjorie Miller and Marjorie Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 10, 2000
LONDON -- Let's cut to the chase. A lot of women in their 40s will not undress in front of a mirror. Some stay married so they'll never have to take their clothes off in front of another man. And then there is Kathleen Turner, who is making her West End debut as the middle-aged Mrs. Robinson -- in the nude. True, she is only naked for a minute and she is illuminated by a soft backlight, the stage equivalent of an airbrush, if there is one. She is in great shape and a stunning heir to the role seared into a generation's memory by Anne Bancroft in the 1967 film of the same name, "The Graduate."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 21, 2000
A bevy of musicals and the Broadway tryout of a new one-woman show about Tallulah Bankhead, starring Kathleen Turner, will highlight the 2000-2001 Mechanic Theatre season. "What I'm really trying to do is get us back into pre-Broadway, back into the incubation process," said Michael J. Brand, executive director of the Mechanic. With six shows, the season will have one less subscription offering than the current season, which opened with the unconventional "Tony n' Tina's Wedding," presented at Scarlett Place, where it is now in its fifth month (see below)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 24, 1999
While "Toy Story 2" and "Princess Mononoke" show audiences that animated features can be just as fluid and expressive as their live-action counterparts, there are live-action movies that seem determined to be as two-dimensional as possible.Enter "End of Days," as idiotic, ugly and ridiculous a case in point as can be imagined.Arnold Schwarzenegger (just what computer animation program created him?) plays a burned-out security guard who foils a plot by Satan (Gabriel Byrne, changing accents more often than Kathleen Turner)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 21, 2000
A bevy of musicals and the Broadway tryout of a new one-woman show about Tallulah Bankhead, starring Kathleen Turner, will highlight the 2000-2001 Mechanic Theatre season. "What I'm really trying to do is get us back into pre-Broadway, back into the incubation process," said Michael J. Brand, executive director of the Mechanic. With six shows, the season will have one less subscription offering than the current season, which opened with the unconventional "Tony n' Tina's Wedding," presented at Scarlett Place, where it is now in its fifth month (see below)
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
You could forgive Harford County Councilwoman Theresa M. Pierno for still being a bit star-struck after the inauguration.After all, she went to President Clinton's inauguration with no tickets and her 16-year-old daughter in tow -- then found herself seated just left of the podium with Jack Nicholson, Kathleen Turner and Turner's husband, among other luminaries."
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1999
Take a bunch of cute babies and a once-lofty star like Kathleen Turner, and what do you get? One of the worst movies ever made."Baby Geniuses" is a unique form of torture in which even the babies aren't that cute. Out of the computer-animated mouths of these babes come crude and stupid remarks. (The Mercedes ad with the kid singing Johnny Cash-style in the back of the SUV did animation a lot better.)In the whole movie, in fact, there's a whole lotta dubbin' goin' on. Perhaps someone had second thoughts about the flat, expository dialogue and tried to improve it, but even third or fourth thoughts wouldn't have helped this soiled diaper of a script.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1997
As grown-ups watch Martin Short snuffle, snort and grimace in the opening moments of "A Simple Wish," they are likely to compose a fervent wish of their own: Please, oh please, get me through this movie!The kids may warm to Short's genial turn as a hapless fairy godmother. Their parents will find him ceaselessly irritating, like someone in the next lunch booth who sneezes through the entire meal. Short is capable of hysterical caricature. With luck, one day he'll find the right movie vehicle.
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