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Kathleen Kennedy Townsend

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By Laura Vozzella | August 1, 2011
Former Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, who gave birth to three of her four daughters at home, writes about the advantages of home births in The Atlantic. Home births are a less expensive and more personal option for some mothers, she writes. "Each of my home birth experiences was different. The first labor was very long. I took a couple of showers, and when I got hungry, I ate. The third time, I walked around the house, up and down the stairs, made the beds, and even had time to watch The Taming of the Shrew with Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
Richard Sher's "Square Off" Sunday features a panel of Marylanders, including Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, marking the 50th anniversary of the assassination of JFK. In addition to John F, Kennedy's niece who served as Maryland's lieutenant governor, "JFK 50 Years Later" includes: Gov. Martin O'Malley, the Rev. Frank M. Reid, III, Ted Venetoulis and Michael Olesker. The show airs at 11 a.m. on WMAR (Channel 2). #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | January 30, 2000
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, working mother, starts her day in much the same way the rest of Maryland's working mothers do: Scrambling to send off her children with full stomachs and light hearts, to conduct their day beyond her protective reach. Kate leaves first. She's a 16-year-old junior at Towson High and is logging the hours she needs to earn her license by driving her mother to school. When Kate gets her license, this ritual won't be necessary. Another little bit of letting go. But Townsend is as excited about this milestone as her daughter might be. "It is such an exciting time in a young person's life.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | August 7, 2012
Saying that her deeply held Catholic faith taught her that "we should love each other," Maryland's former lieutenant governor Kathleen Kennedy Townsend threw her support behind the state's same-sex marriage law this morning. "All people, gay or straight, should have the opportunity to marry the people they love," Townsend said during an event held at the Marylanders for Marriage Equality campaign headquarters in Baltimore. Maryland's General Assembly narrowly approved a law legalizing same-sex marriage this year, however opponents have petitioned it to referendum.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
In this roomful of savvy politicians, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend -- wearing thick glasses, no makeup and a broad grin -- looks more like a student of government than the guest speaker.She's among the youngest at this networking breakfast for Maryland women legislators. She's never been elected to office on her own. And her informal talk -- You can make a difference . . . Get involved -- has more spirit than substance.Rather than speaking, though, she's here to get a crash course in local politics.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2000
U.S. REP. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is facing the kind of decision that could make or break his career: Should he run for governor in 2002? The question has been out there for a year and a half, since Gov. Parris N. Glendening won a second term in 1998 and Ehrlich emerged overnight as perhaps the only Republican in Maryland capable of mounting a strong run for the State House in 2002. Clearly, Ehrlich hasn't made a decision. Ehrlich would have to give up a seat in Congress to make the run for governor, a race that he would begin as an underdog.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2000
IF YOU'RE a registered Democrat who votes regularly, chances are you have gotten a recorded phone message in the past week from the state party. The message is simple: Support the Democratic team on Election Day. Curiously, the calls have not been coming from veteran Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, who is on the ballot next week, or Gov. Parris N. Glendening, the titular head of the Maryland Democratic Party. Rather, the first round of calls came from Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend - who is not on the ballot this year but is almost sure to be a candidate for governor in 2002.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and By Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2002
The last of a parade of models had sashayed down the runway in "Style and Substance," a recent fund-raising fashion show and dinner for gubernatorial candidate Robert Ehrlich. The guests buzzed with anticipation. The lights grew dim. The loudspeaker thundered with the sound of Tina Turner's "You're Simply the Best." From the corner of the catwalk came the show's grand finale, Ehrlich and his wife, Kendel -- modeling what the emcee called "very sexy Republican clothes." Ehrlich wore a three-piece tuxedo, Kendel a floor-length white evening gown.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron | August 31, 1997
Kathleen Kennedy was 12 when her uncle, President John F. Kennedy, was killed in Dallas.Two days after the slaying, her father, Robert F. Kennedy, wrote Kathleen a note urging her to help care for her younger brother Joe and the president's young son, John."
TOPIC
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2001
This is a test of the emergency management system. The emergency: broken limbs, sexual abuse and other injuries to teens serving time in Maryland's juvenile correctional facilities. The management is supposed to come -- at least in part -- from Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, the administration's point person on criminal justice. But as evidence mounts of failings within Maryland's juvenile justice apparatus, so do questions over how Townsend has performed as a leader in the areas she oversees, and whether the concerns will dog her when she runs for governor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | August 1, 2011
Former Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, who gave birth to three of her four daughters at home, writes about the advantages of home births in The Atlantic. Home births are a less expensive and more personal option for some mothers, she writes. "Each of my home birth experiences was different. The first labor was very long. I took a couple of showers, and when I got hungry, I ate. The third time, I walked around the house, up and down the stairs, made the beds, and even had time to watch The Taming of the Shrew with Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
Maryland officials joined in mourning Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, with many describing him as irreplaceable and some expressing hope that his death might help revive a faltering Democratic effort to overhaul the nation's health care system. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a co-chair of Kennedy's 1980 presidential campaign who would later serve with him in the Senate for 22 years, described the Massachusetts Democrat as a loyal friend who was "modest about himself." At one of the high points of Kennedy's life, his speech at the 1980 Democratic National Convention, it was Mikulski who introduced him to the crowd at Madison Square Garden in New York.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 25, 2009
Anyone caught in the logistical nightmare formerly known as Barack Obama's inauguration can take heart that democracy was at work: Even some Kennedys got frozen out. Three of former Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's four daughters planned to attend the swearing-in. Yes, they had Uncle Ted to get them tickets, but they waited in line like everybody else to get inside the Purple Zone. And waited. And waited. In a tunnel. In the cold. And mostly in place. They moved a bit over the course of three-plus hours, but not enough to get them inside.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | November 18, 2008
Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown has been appointed co-chairman of President-elect Barack Obama's transition team overseeing veterans policy, officials said yesterday. At the Agency Review Team for the Department of Veterans Affairs, Brown - an Iraq war veteran and 24-year member of the Army Reserves - will help formulate the incoming administration's policy goals regarding veterans. Brown will be working with Maryland Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez, who is part of a team reviewing personnel and policies at the departments of Justice, Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs, and Housing and Urban Development.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,david.nitkin@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
DENVER - The lights will dim inside the Pepsi Center tonight, a shock of silver hair will appear on giant monitors, and connections will be made once again between Camelot and the Obama nation. A film tribute to Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, a 46-year-veteran of the Senate diagnosed with a brain tumor this year, will dominate the opening hours of the Democratic National Convention. Watching from a prime seat will be Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Maryland's former lieutenant governor and Kennedy's niece, one of the state's 99 delegates here.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | June 6, 2008
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend is still moved by the strangers who approach her to describe how her father inspired them. Former U.S. Sen. Joseph Tydings, a Maryland Democrat, says that his dear friend Robert F. Kennedy's murder transformed him into a gun control activist, a move that cost him his political career. And civil rights advocate Kweisi Mfume remembers 1968 as a pivotal year of his life, with Kennedy's death as one in a series of events prompting him to pursue a political career that led him to the halls of Congress.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1998
Weary and short of time, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend rehearsed out loud her final speech of the day as she hurried into Washington. Her voice trailed off. She didn't like the sound of what she was saying.She scratched out a few sentences in her prepared remarks. Then, as she stared out the car window, the right words came to her, words she knows by heart, the words of her father."Moral courage," she said a half-hour later at an Israeli tribute to her father, Robert F. Kennedy, "is a rarer commodity than bravery in battle or great intelligence.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2002
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend arrived in Annapolis in 1984 as a young lawyer working for the House Appropriations Committee, and promptly broke the rules. Townsend was trying to persuade the state to yank its investments from corporations operating in South Africa. She had traveled to Johannesburg a few months before taking the job, forming strong views she couldn't keep to herself. "The appropriations committee members were discussing it, and there was a legislator who I thought said something inappropriate and dumb," Townsend recalled recently.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 13, 2008
We hate talking about it. We fear saying something awkward or intrusive. We think we'll only make it worse by acknowledging it, so we fall silent. "I think, in large part," Kathleen Kennedy Townsend says, "we don't have a culture that knows how to deal with death." Townsend, a former Maryland lieutenant governor, is, of course, sadly expert on the subject of death. When she was 12, her uncle was killed; when she was 16, her father. That these intimates were President John F. Kennedy and presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy is something that is a well-known part of her biography, if not necessarily something that she speaks extensively about in public.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | January 31, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Americans finally have narrowed the presidential race to two front-runners: John F. Kennedy and Ronald Reagan. Too bad they're both busy chatting up Guinevere and Galahad, respectively, in the ultimate Camelot, where the climate really is perfect all the year. Eternally. Back on Earth, where we typically elect live specimens, the legacies of Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Reagan can't get a rest. The Republican race looks like a Barnum & Bailey elephant walk, with every candidate trying to tie his trunk to Mr. Reagan's tail.
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