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Katherine Needleman

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By Jordan Bartel | May 29, 2012
"It was a compulsion. I had no other choice," Katherine Needleman said regarding what lead her down the path to a career in music. "I would've been a pianist except my technique was too limited. " Though she's experimented with many other instruments, Needleman, 34, who moved from Iowa to Ellicott City when she was 7 and now lives in Dickeyville, finally settled on the oboe while at college and has been the principal oboist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra since 2003. Since that time, she was been a part of nearly all BSO performances and is especially looking forward to playing the Strauss Concerto next season.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
A one-of-a-kind oboe belonging to a musician with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was reportedly stolen outside a Montreal hotel Tuesday morning. With the BSO season starting in less than a month, she's anxious to get it back. “We all are very wedded to these instruments,” said Katherine Needleman, principal oboist for the BSO. “It's very special to me. It's the only one like it.” Needleman said the oboe was a prototype, made by Yamaha while she was working with the company in developing a new model.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 28, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra plays in suitably large concert halls, but its individual members often pop up in smaller halls around the region. A favorite spot is the Sundays at Three chamber music series, for which five Baltimore Symphony Orchestra woodwind and string section leaders perform on Sunday, April 6, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Sundays at Three lists 33 Baltimore Symphony Orchestra members as being among its regular performers. That means around one-third of the BSO's total membership has played for this Columbia-based music series.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 28, 2014
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra plays in suitably large concert halls, but its individual members often pop up in smaller halls around the region. A favorite spot is the Sundays at Three chamber music series, for which five Baltimore Symphony Orchestra woodwind and string section leaders perform on Sunday, April 6, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. Sundays at Three lists 33 Baltimore Symphony Orchestra members as being among its regular performers. That means around one-third of the BSO's total membership has played for this Columbia-based music series.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
A one-of-a-kind oboe belonging to a musician with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was reportedly stolen outside a Montreal hotel Tuesday morning. With the BSO season starting in less than a month, she's anxious to get it back. “We all are very wedded to these instruments,” said Katherine Needleman, principal oboist for the BSO. “It's very special to me. It's the only one like it.” Needleman said the oboe was a prototype, made by Yamaha while she was working with the company in developing a new model.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 17, 2005
Ten years ago, a 16-year-old from the Howard County neighborhood of Dunloggin walked onto the stage of Meyerhoff Symphony Hall to perform part of Mozart's Oboe Concerto. Her back-up band was the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. This week, she'll be in the same spot on that stage to play the same concerto (all of it this time) with the same ensemble, but not as a guest soloist. Katherine Needleman will merely be stepping forward from her usual position at the center of the BSO's woodwind section.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith | April 12, 2005
Concert Lab, founded in 2003 by Baltimore Symphony Orchestra violinist Ellen Orner as an outlet for new music, will present two world premieres played by BSO members in a free concert today at the Maryland Institute College of Art. The program includes Landscape - After Yves Tanguy for solo violin by noted composer Benjamin Lees, a distinctive and prolific force in American music for the past 50 years. This piece was commissioned by and dedicated to Orner. Also being premiered is Moods for oboe and string quartet by Chia-Yu Hsu, a work dedicated to BSO principal oboist Katherine Needleman.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH | October 2, 2005
An orchestra depends, maybe even more than most organizations, on the sum of its parts - dozens of musicians with distinct artistic temperaments and different levels of achievement somehow coming together to create a cohesive force. The stronger the individual talent, of course, the greater the total product. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra has long been fortunate in both its single and group assets. Here are two standouts who contribute mightily to the BSO's current strength and promise much for its future: KATHERINE NEEDLEMAN principal oboist In October 2003, audiences at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall got a taste of how much the BSO had gained by hiring Katherine Needleman as principal oboist.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 28, 2005
The impulse to help those devastated by Hurricane Katrina has generated fundraising concerts throughout the country, including one in Baltimore equally generous in intent and content. Organized by pianist Lura Johnson and her husband, violinist Matthew Horwitz, the event Monday night at Central Presbyterian Church brought together a stellar lineup of locally based talent, headlined by the almost legendary keyboard artist Leon Fleisher. In all, 16 musicians, including Baltimore Symphony Orchestra players and faculty members from area schools, volunteered their services to benefit relief funds of the Red Cross and the American Symphony Orchestra League.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 22, 2005
Seemingly unperturbed by the imminent approach of the White Death - and presumably already well-stocked with bread, milk and toilet paper - a goodly number of people turned out last night to hear the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra play an ear-warming program of popular pieces. Gunther Herbig, a frequent and welcome BSO guest, was on the podium at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, assuring an ease and cohesiveness of execution, not to mention refined taste. And the orchestra's exceptional principal oboist, Katherine Needleman, was the featured solo player, assuring an unpretentious burst of virtuosity, not to mention abundant musicality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | May 29, 2012
"It was a compulsion. I had no other choice," Katherine Needleman said regarding what lead her down the path to a career in music. "I would've been a pianist except my technique was too limited. " Though she's experimented with many other instruments, Needleman, 34, who moved from Iowa to Ellicott City when she was 7 and now lives in Dickeyville, finally settled on the oboe while at college and has been the principal oboist with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra since 2003. Since that time, she was been a part of nearly all BSO performances and is especially looking forward to playing the Strauss Concerto next season.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 17, 2005
Ten years ago, a 16-year-old from the Howard County neighborhood of Dunloggin walked onto the stage of Meyerhoff Symphony Hall to perform part of Mozart's Oboe Concerto. Her back-up band was the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. This week, she'll be in the same spot on that stage to play the same concerto (all of it this time) with the same ensemble, but not as a guest soloist. Katherine Needleman will merely be stepping forward from her usual position at the center of the BSO's woodwind section.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 11, 2004
With a surge of soul-on-sleeve, enveloping romanticism - and, perhaps, an extra degree of passion and commitment - the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra opened its penultimate season with Yuri Temirkanov as music director last night. Word of the conductor's decision to end his tenure in two years could have reached few people in the audience at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, but everyone onstage had learned about it a couple of days ago. I suspect the weight of that news accounted for at least some of the compelling results.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 21, 2003
Yuri Temirkanov's schedule will keep him out of town for the next six months, but his imprint as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will be much in evidence well before he's back on the podium in November. Just before his final concerts of the 2002-2003 season two weeks ago, he and an audition committee within the orchestra agreed on a choice for the important position of principal oboe. Katherine Needleman, currently principal oboist of the Richmond (Va.) Symphony, will join the BSO in September.
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