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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A leading House Republican said yesterday that Congress would let the government take on new debt to avoid a possible cash crisis next month, an about-face from GOP efforts to use the federal debt limit as a lever over the White House in budget negotiations."
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
Bringing his surging Republican presidential campaign into heavily Democratic Maryland, Texas Gov. George W. Bush raised about $400,000 at a Baltimore fund-raiser last night after endorsing the importance of faith-based institutions during a stop at an east-side community center.Confident and folksy, Bush energized a crowd of about 500 at a downtown hotel with a 20-minute speech that outlined a socially compassionate, fiscally conservative agenda but steered clear of hot-button issues such as abortion.
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NEWS
By JEFF SHEAR | April 2, 1995
House Budget Committee Chairman John R. Kasich, Republican of Ohio, will find himself in the middle of a bruising congressional battle later this week when the debate begins on legislation to slash the federal budget to pay for a massive tax cut.House Republicans are pushing a five-year, $190 billion package of cuts in business and personal taxes as part of the "Contract with America." Just two weeks ago, Mr. Kasich's committee unveiled a plan to cut discretionary spending by $100 billion to help fund the tax cuts.
NEWS
April 1, 1998
SO MUCH FOR austerity, that clarion call of Republican fiscal conservatives in Congress. Pork is back.Is it ever! Just look at the 1,600 "high-priority" projects included in a monstrous transportation bill about to clear the House of Representatives.This is pure, 100-percent lard that will cost taxpayers a staggering $18 billion over the next six years.Nearly every congressional district gets its share of goodies -- about four projects per member. Representatives who oppose such blatant taxpayer giveaways, such as Delaware's lone House member, Republican Michael N. Castle, wind up with nothing.
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | November 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Budget-slashing House members backed away from their proposal to raise the minimum federal retirement age late last week, and lost their battle Monday night to change retirement rules for workers hired in the future.In their effort to reduce the federal budget by $90 billion, Reps. Tim Penny, D-Minn., and John Kasich, R-Ohio, had sought to raise the minimum retirement age for federal employees to 65, to be phased in over 20 years.But that proposal incurred the wrath of Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The fast-paced Republican timetable for passage of the party's conservative revolution encountered its first major delay yesterday as House GOP leaders abandoned their promise to move for massive spending cuts by the end of January.Slippage of the central element of the Republican agenda might jeopardize the 100-day timetable for the House Republican "Contract with America." House leaders acknowledged that they are having more trouble identifying and agreeing upon the $200 billion in spending cuts needed to finance the contract than they had anticipated, marking the first serious setback for the newly powerful Republicans.
NEWS
April 1, 1998
SO MUCH FOR austerity, that clarion call of Republican fiscal conservatives in Congress. Pork is back.Is it ever! Just look at the 1,600 "high-priority" projects included in a monstrous transportation bill about to clear the House of Representatives.This is pure, 100-percent lard that will cost taxpayers a staggering $18 billion over the next six years.Nearly every congressional district gets its share of goodies -- about four projects per member. Representatives who oppose such blatant taxpayer giveaways, such as Delaware's lone House member, Republican Michael N. Castle, wind up with nothing.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Less than a week after his victory on the North American Free Trade Agreement, President Clinton faces another critical challenge in Congress today when the House votes on a bipartisan budget-cutting plan that threatens to strangle Mr. Clinton's domestic agenda for the rest of his term.The president and his congressional allies worked furiously against the deficit-reduction measure through the past weekend and seemed to be making progress in their efforts to defeat it."We're moving, we're moving," said Rep. Bill Richardson, D-N.M.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 27, 1996
VILLANOVA, PA. -- House Republican budget-cutters sought from students here yesterday the first outside-the-Beltway reviews of their year battling the deficit. On Broadway, this show would close.Budget Committee Chairman John R. Kasich of Ohio and other members of the tight-fisted band that braved two government shutdowns as they tried to trim sacred-cow programs -- such as Medicare and Medicaid -- had hoped to find support if not appreciation from the generation they believe has most to gain from stemming the tide of federal debt.
NEWS
By James P. Pinkerton | December 28, 1993
PRESIDENT Clinton's intervention in the American Airlines strike was popular with the traveling public and even more popular with the flight attendants' union. However, what Mr. Clinton tossed to organized labor is a mere chicken neck compared to the rich rack of ribs he is sliding toward the federal bureaucracy.As he shoved NAFTA down the gullet of the AFL-CIO, Mr. Clinton kept repeating his prescription for American economic health: We must "compete, not retreat." He's right -- the whole country needs stern economic medicine: less waste, more productivity.
NEWS
February 24, 1997
DESPITE HAPPY TALK about balancing the budget by 2002, the nation's fiscal outlook remains a lot grimmer than most incumbent politicians want voters to think. Listen to a real deficit hawk, Rep. Christopher Shays, R-Conn.: "I'm fearful that we will see an agreement that allows the president to have a pleasant two years and allows the Congress to get re-elected."Exactly.Although important gaps remain between Democratic and Republican proposals for getting to zero in five years, the real problem is not 2002.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 27, 1996
VILLANOVA, PA. -- House Republican budget-cutters sought from students here yesterday the first outside-the-Beltway reviews of their year battling the deficit. On Broadway, this show would close.Budget Committee Chairman John R. Kasich of Ohio and other members of the tight-fisted band that braved two government shutdowns as they tried to trim sacred-cow programs -- such as Medicare and Medicaid -- had hoped to find support if not appreciation from the generation they believe has most to gain from stemming the tide of federal debt.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A leading House Republican said yesterday that Congress would let the government take on new debt to avoid a possible cash crisis next month, an about-face from GOP efforts to use the federal debt limit as a lever over the White House in budget negotiations."
NEWS
By JEFF SHEAR | August 6, 1995
As the Senate was about to vote on a resolution to balance the federal budget by 2002, Rep. John R. Kasich, Republican of Ohio, slipped into the Senate chamber. Grinning happily, arms folded across his chest, the spirited young chairman of the Budget Committee looked upon a scene of Republican triumph, not unlike the one he had helped engineer a week earlier in the House.Senate Budget Committee Chairman Pete V. Domenici, Republican of New Mexico, spotted him standing at the center door and strode up to the aisle to meet him. The two men grabbed each other in a bear hug.They made a striking contrast.
NEWS
By JEFF SHEAR | April 2, 1995
House Budget Committee Chairman John R. Kasich, Republican of Ohio, will find himself in the middle of a bruising congressional battle later this week when the debate begins on legislation to slash the federal budget to pay for a massive tax cut.House Republicans are pushing a five-year, $190 billion package of cuts in business and personal taxes as part of the "Contract with America." Just two weeks ago, Mr. Kasich's committee unveiled a plan to cut discretionary spending by $100 billion to help fund the tax cuts.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The fast-paced Republican timetable for passage of the party's conservative revolution encountered its first major delay yesterday as House GOP leaders abandoned their promise to move for massive spending cuts by the end of January.Slippage of the central element of the Republican agenda might jeopardize the 100-day timetable for the House Republican "Contract with America." House leaders acknowledged that they are having more trouble identifying and agreeing upon the $200 billion in spending cuts needed to finance the contract than they had anticipated, marking the first serious setback for the newly powerful Republicans.
NEWS
February 24, 1997
DESPITE HAPPY TALK about balancing the budget by 2002, the nation's fiscal outlook remains a lot grimmer than most incumbent politicians want voters to think. Listen to a real deficit hawk, Rep. Christopher Shays, R-Conn.: "I'm fearful that we will see an agreement that allows the president to have a pleasant two years and allows the Congress to get re-elected."Exactly.Although important gaps remain between Democratic and Republican proposals for getting to zero in five years, the real problem is not 2002.
NEWS
By JEFF SHEAR | August 6, 1995
As the Senate was about to vote on a resolution to balance the federal budget by 2002, Rep. John R. Kasich, Republican of Ohio, slipped into the Senate chamber. Grinning happily, arms folded across his chest, the spirited young chairman of the Budget Committee looked upon a scene of Republican triumph, not unlike the one he had helped engineer a week earlier in the House.Senate Budget Committee Chairman Pete V. Domenici, Republican of New Mexico, spotted him standing at the center door and strode up to the aisle to meet him. The two men grabbed each other in a bear hug.They made a striking contrast.
NEWS
By James P. Pinkerton | December 28, 1993
PRESIDENT Clinton's intervention in the American Airlines strike was popular with the traveling public and even more popular with the flight attendants' union. However, what Mr. Clinton tossed to organized labor is a mere chicken neck compared to the rich rack of ribs he is sliding toward the federal bureaucracy.As he shoved NAFTA down the gullet of the AFL-CIO, Mr. Clinton kept repeating his prescription for American economic health: We must "compete, not retreat." He's right -- the whole country needs stern economic medicine: less waste, more productivity.
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service | November 24, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Budget-slashing House members backed away from their proposal to raise the minimum federal retirement age late last week, and lost their battle Monday night to change retirement rules for workers hired in the future.In their effort to reduce the federal budget by $90 billion, Reps. Tim Penny, D-Minn., and John Kasich, R-Ohio, had sought to raise the minimum retirement age for federal employees to 65, to be phased in over 20 years.But that proposal incurred the wrath of Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md.
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