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Karl Wallenda

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NEWS
May 5, 1996
Angel Wallenda: The Associated Press reported erroneously Friday that Angel and Steven Wallenda performed as members of the Flying Wallendas. Steven Wallenda formed his own high-wire act and the couple were never members of the troupe once headed by his uncle and family patriarch, Karl Wallenda.Also, the Associated Press erroneously reported that Steven Wallenda and his 9-year-old son are Karl Wallenda's last direct descendants. One daughter and four grandchildren of Karl Wallenda still perform in separate acts.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 9, 2012
Forecasters are calling for a chance of showers or thunderstorms to pass Wednesday afternoon, potentially making Nik Wallenda's planned tightwire walk over the Inner Harbor a little more slippery. National Weather Service meteorologists are calling for a 50 percent of showers Thursday, with a particular risk after 3 p.m. The hourly forecast calls for passing thunderstorms around 6 p.m. AccuWeather, meanwhile, has a risk of thunderstorms during the 5 o'clock hour of its forecast.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
For the second time in 40 years, a member of the "Flying Wallenda" family will wow Inner Harbor crowds Wednesday with nothing between him and the murky harbor waters but a wire cable. Self-proclaimed "King of the High Wire" Nik Wallenda will follow in the footsteps of his great-grandfather, Karl, "The Great Wallenda. " While Karl Wallenda crossed the harbor over 600 feet of wire 60 feet in the air in 1973, Nik Wallenda will ascend a wire stretched 300 feet from the Light Street pavilion to a barge in the harbor, up to a height of about 90 feet.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
He didn't fall — but it looked like he came close. Daredevil Nik Wallenda made it nearly all the way across a wire over the Inner Harbor, stepping steadily and deliberately, when he stopped to kneel and pump his fist in the air. He was walking 300 feet across, up to 82 feet in the air, in a stunt to mark the imminent opening of a Ripley's Believe It or Not museum. The rapt crowd, cell phone cameras in the air, sighed with relief. But their celebration — and Wallenda's, too — was premature.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
Helen Kreis Wallenda,85, the last member of the original four-member Great Wallendas high-wire troupe and frequent pinnacle of the famous Wallenda pyramid during decades on the high wire, died Thursday in Sarasota, Fla.She was 17 when she climbed Karl Wallenda's shoulders in the debut performance of the Wallenda pyramid in Madison Square Garden. The year was 1928; and the Great Wallendas, just arrived in America from Europe, brought the audience to its feet for 11 minutes of raucous approval.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 9, 2012
Forecasters are calling for a chance of showers or thunderstorms to pass Wednesday afternoon, potentially making Nik Wallenda's planned tightwire walk over the Inner Harbor a little more slippery. National Weather Service meteorologists are calling for a 50 percent of showers Thursday, with a particular risk after 3 p.m. The hourly forecast calls for passing thunderstorms around 6 p.m. AccuWeather, meanwhile, has a risk of thunderstorms during the 5 o'clock hour of its forecast.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Believe it or not, a seventh-generation member of the Flying Wallenda family plans to walk a high wire above Baltimore's Inner Harbor on May 9. Nik Wallenda's feat will promote the opening next month of a new Ripley's Believe It or Not "odditorium" in Harborplace's Light Street Pavilion. It's also a tip of the hat to a similar wire act by his great-grandfather Karl Wallenda, who walked between two cranes above the harbor in 1973 to open the fourth annual City Fair. "When I was approached about this, I was so excited because of just that," the 33-year-old Wallenda said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2012
He didn't fall — but it looked like he came close. Daredevil Nik Wallenda made it nearly all the way across a wire over the Inner Harbor, stepping steadily and deliberately, when he stopped to kneel and pump his fist in the air. He was walking 300 feet across, up to 82 feet in the air, in a stunt to mark the imminent opening of a Ripley's Believe It or Not museum. The rapt crowd, cell phone cameras in the air, sighed with relief. But their celebration — and Wallenda's, too — was premature.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss | September 10, 2000
Chris Richard -- UP -- Rookie first baseman homered twice, had six RBIs and came within two feet of hitting for the cycle Sunday in Cleveland. Former understudy to Mark McGwire has been a pleasant offensive surprise; finding him a position remains a challenge. Injury intrigue -- DOWN -- Scott Erickson was described as suffering elbow "inflammation" just before he underwent ligament replacement surgery. Now, the club says Albert Belle's hip is "day-to-day." Whatever. Ryan Kohlmeier -- EVEN -- Last month, the rookie closer resembled Goose Gossage.
FEATURES
March 22, 2001
Today in history: March 22 In 1765, Britain enacted the Stamp Act to raise money from the American colonies and repealed it the following year. In 1882, Congress outlawed polygamy. In 1895, Auguste and Louis Lumiere showed their first movie to an invited audience in Paris. In 1933, during Prohibition, President Franklin Roosevelt signed a measure to make wine and beer containing up to 3.2 percent alcohol legal. In 1941, the Grand Coulee Dam in Washington state went into operation. In 1945, the Arab League was formed with the adoption of a charter in Cairo, Egypt.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
For the second time in 40 years, a member of the "Flying Wallenda" family will wow Inner Harbor crowds Wednesday with nothing between him and the murky harbor waters but a wire cable. Self-proclaimed "King of the High Wire" Nik Wallenda will follow in the footsteps of his great-grandfather, Karl, "The Great Wallenda. " While Karl Wallenda crossed the harbor over 600 feet of wire 60 feet in the air in 1973, Nik Wallenda will ascend a wire stretched 300 feet from the Light Street pavilion to a barge in the harbor, up to a height of about 90 feet.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Believe it or not, a seventh-generation member of the Flying Wallenda family plans to walk a high wire above Baltimore's Inner Harbor on May 9. Nik Wallenda's feat will promote the opening next month of a new Ripley's Believe It or Not "odditorium" in Harborplace's Light Street Pavilion. It's also a tip of the hat to a similar wire act by his great-grandfather Karl Wallenda, who walked between two cranes above the harbor in 1973 to open the fourth annual City Fair. "When I was approached about this, I was so excited because of just that," the 33-year-old Wallenda said.
NEWS
May 12, 1996
Helen Kreis Wallenda,85, the last member of the original four-member Great Wallendas high-wire troupe and frequent pinnacle of the famous Wallenda pyramid during decades on the high wire, died Thursday in Sarasota, Fla.She was 17 when she climbed Karl Wallenda's shoulders in the debut performance of the Wallenda pyramid in Madison Square Garden. The year was 1928; and the Great Wallendas, just arrived in America from Europe, brought the audience to its feet for 11 minutes of raucous approval.
NEWS
May 5, 1996
Angel Wallenda: The Associated Press reported erroneously Friday that Angel and Steven Wallenda performed as members of the Flying Wallendas. Steven Wallenda formed his own high-wire act and the couple were never members of the troupe once headed by his uncle and family patriarch, Karl Wallenda.Also, the Associated Press erroneously reported that Steven Wallenda and his 9-year-old son are Karl Wallenda's last direct descendants. One daughter and four grandchildren of Karl Wallenda still perform in separate acts.
FEATURES
By Gerry Yandel and Gerry Yandel,Cox News Service | November 15, 1992
TALLULAH FALLS, Ga. -- As the eye scans the north Georgia terrain and pauses at Tallulah Gorge, the massive chasm where RTC the tiny but powerful Tallulah River has patiently carved 600 to 1,000 feet into the Earth's crust, it looks as if God blinked while creating the topography.The people who settled the area, which Gov. Zell Miller declared last week will become a state park in mid-1993, were so awed by the gorge that they named parts of it the Devil's Pulpit, the Devil's Foot Bath and the Devil's Jail.
NEWS
March 21, 2001
John Eugene Poling, 78, lumber company director John Eugene Poling, former director of operations for an Annapolis lumber company, died March 14 of cancer at Brighton Gardens Health Care Center in Naples, Fla. He was 78. Mr. Poling had lived in Glen Burnie for 42 years before moving to Florida last year. In the 1990s, he retired from J. F. Johnson Lumber Co., where he had been director of operations for 20 years. Earlier, he was a building superintendent for Kasten Construction Co. and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.
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