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By RICHARD REEVES | July 27, 1993
Berlin -- At dinnertime a few nights ago, my wife and I stopped by the Moscau Restaurant, the place on Karl Marx Allee where East Berlin's communist elite would meet for a treat. The giant Sputnik was still on the roof and, in fact, the restaurant looked better than it used to -- candles, crisp linens and gleaming samovars made the main room more inviting than it ever was in the bad old days.But no one was there. A lone waitress looked across the room at us, longingly. We shook our heads.
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By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
A four-page personal handwritten letter from John Jay Audubon to Gideon B. Smith, dated May 18, 1843, taken from the Connecticut Historical Society. A single-page letter from Marie Antoinette written in French on Oct. 2, 1784, taken from the Connecticut Historical Society. A letter written in French from Napoleon Bonaparte on Sept. 17, 1878, taken from the Connecticut Historical Society. A letter written by Karl Marx on April 14, 1874, to P.H. King inquiring about the title and price of a book bearing Marx's signature, taken from the Wilbur Collection at the University of Vermont Library.
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By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | September 23, 1990
Standing there under the portrait of Karl Marx, he could have been one of the few surviving old Bolsheviks, back for one last hurrah, one more speech urging all good comrades to cling to the spoils of the Revolution.His words read a bit that way, too, as he said nationalists demanding independence from Moscow should cool it, that "reason must prevail over passion if there is to be a climate conducive to the settlement of disagreements." It could have been one of those departed Kremlin bosses, Nikita Khrushchev or Leonid Brezhnev, offering a veiled warning to Warsaw or Prague.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 16, 2008
Dispatches for the New York Tribune By Karl Marx Before achieving fame as a political philosopher, Karl Marx wrote lots of journalism, in Germany, in England and for Charles Dana, editor of Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, then the newspaper with the biggest circulation in the world. John F. Kennedy once said that maybe if Greeley had paid Marx a few bucks more, the Russian Revolution and the Cold War would never have happened, a great joke with a kernel of truth hiding in it. Whatever we make of the answers Marx gave in Das Kapital, these vivid pieces show how clearly he perceived and felt the problems of poverty and ownership in the first stages of industrial capitalism.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 16, 2008
Dispatches for the New York Tribune By Karl Marx Before achieving fame as a political philosopher, Karl Marx wrote lots of journalism, in Germany, in England and for Charles Dana, editor of Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, then the newspaper with the biggest circulation in the world. John F. Kennedy once said that maybe if Greeley had paid Marx a few bucks more, the Russian Revolution and the Cold War would never have happened, a great joke with a kernel of truth hiding in it. Whatever we make of the answers Marx gave in Das Kapital, these vivid pieces show how clearly he perceived and felt the problems of poverty and ownership in the first stages of industrial capitalism.
NEWS
December 21, 1991
Twenty-four hours a day the red banner flies over Kremlin spires. Floodlights and a forced-air system keep it proudly billowing through gloomy nights and windless days. But not much longer. On the last day of this year, the Soviet flag will be lowered and the flag of Russia will rise in its place. The ceremony will mark the end of one more effort to remake human nature.The Soviet state was supposed to be more than a new form of government; it was an optimistic attempt to create a new human consciousness.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 11, 2004
Farewell, Godspeed: The Greatest Eulogies of Our Time, edited by Cyrus M. Copeland. Harmony Books. 336 pages. $18.95. At first blush -- first chill? -- the idea may seem lugubrious, the contents depressing. Sixty-four funereal tributes to notable women and men of the last couple of generations are an awful lot of sadness. But no. The departeds range from Karl Marx (by Friedrich Engels) to Virginia Woolf (by Christopher Isherwood), from Henry Ford (by Edgar A. Guest) to Robert Frost (by John F. Kennedy)
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
A four-page personal handwritten letter from John Jay Audubon to Gideon B. Smith, dated May 18, 1843, taken from the Connecticut Historical Society. A single-page letter from Marie Antoinette written in French on Oct. 2, 1784, taken from the Connecticut Historical Society. A letter written in French from Napoleon Bonaparte on Sept. 17, 1878, taken from the Connecticut Historical Society. A letter written by Karl Marx on April 14, 1874, to P.H. King inquiring about the title and price of a book bearing Marx's signature, taken from the Wilbur Collection at the University of Vermont Library.
NEWS
By Tim Baker | September 17, 1990
Budapest. A HUGE bronze statue of Karl Marx dominates the central foyer of the Budapest University of Economics on the banks of the Danube in this ancient Eastern European capital struggling to find its way from a stifling communism to a prosperous free-enterprise system. The old ideologue sits on his marble pedestal and reaches out his hand in a gesture of earnest objection. But on this first day of classes as the new semester begins, the young Hungarian college students pay him no attention.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART and JANET KIDD STEWART,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 9, 2006
In the latest personal finance tell-all, author Judith Levine bares not only her salary (about $45,000 a year), but also the emotional arithmetic behind her decisions about money: Q-tips are a luxury, organic French roast coffee beans are a necessity. Her book is yet another unit in the simplicity aisle of the American superstore, between the simpler-living magazines chock full of product advertisements and the pricey home organization systems designed to declutter our lives. Not Buying It: My Year Without Shopping (Free Press, $25)
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART and JANET KIDD STEWART,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | April 9, 2006
In the latest personal finance tell-all, author Judith Levine bares not only her salary (about $45,000 a year), but also the emotional arithmetic behind her decisions about money: Q-tips are a luxury, organic French roast coffee beans are a necessity. Her book is yet another unit in the simplicity aisle of the American superstore, between the simpler-living magazines chock full of product advertisements and the pricey home organization systems designed to declutter our lives. Not Buying It: My Year Without Shopping (Free Press, $25)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,Sun Books Editor | January 25, 2004
I am not a credible critic of a great deal of the fiction held sacred by the magistrates and myrmidons of many of this nation's schools of writing - and by small literary journals inhabited by them. To the extent that I read what often is called "experimental" and sometimes "postmodernist" fiction, self-referential insistences tend to make me queasy. Writers writing about writers writing of writing's deep agonies. That sort of thing. Thus prejudiced, I am of a mind to conclude that Vanishing Point, by David Markson (Shoemaker & Hoard, 208 pages, $15)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | January 11, 2004
Farewell, Godspeed: The Greatest Eulogies of Our Time, edited by Cyrus M. Copeland. Harmony Books. 336 pages. $18.95. At first blush -- first chill? -- the idea may seem lugubrious, the contents depressing. Sixty-four funereal tributes to notable women and men of the last couple of generations are an awful lot of sadness. But no. The departeds range from Karl Marx (by Friedrich Engels) to Virginia Woolf (by Christopher Isherwood), from Henry Ford (by Edgar A. Guest) to Robert Frost (by John F. Kennedy)
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | July 27, 1993
Berlin -- At dinnertime a few nights ago, my wife and I stopped by the Moscau Restaurant, the place on Karl Marx Allee where East Berlin's communist elite would meet for a treat. The giant Sputnik was still on the roof and, in fact, the restaurant looked better than it used to -- candles, crisp linens and gleaming samovars made the main room more inviting than it ever was in the bad old days.But no one was there. A lone waitress looked across the room at us, longingly. We shook our heads.
NEWS
December 21, 1991
Twenty-four hours a day the red banner flies over Kremlin spires. Floodlights and a forced-air system keep it proudly billowing through gloomy nights and windless days. But not much longer. On the last day of this year, the Soviet flag will be lowered and the flag of Russia will rise in its place. The ceremony will mark the end of one more effort to remake human nature.The Soviet state was supposed to be more than a new form of government; it was an optimistic attempt to create a new human consciousness.
TOPIC
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | September 23, 1990
Standing there under the portrait of Karl Marx, he could have been one of the few surviving old Bolsheviks, back for one last hurrah, one more speech urging all good comrades to cling to the spoils of the Revolution.His words read a bit that way, too, as he said nationalists demanding independence from Moscow should cool it, that "reason must prevail over passion if there is to be a climate conducive to the settlement of disagreements." It could have been one of those departed Kremlin bosses, Nikita Khrushchev or Leonid Brezhnev, offering a veiled warning to Warsaw or Prague.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,Sun Books Editor | January 25, 2004
I am not a credible critic of a great deal of the fiction held sacred by the magistrates and myrmidons of many of this nation's schools of writing - and by small literary journals inhabited by them. To the extent that I read what often is called "experimental" and sometimes "postmodernist" fiction, self-referential insistences tend to make me queasy. Writers writing about writers writing of writing's deep agonies. That sort of thing. Thus prejudiced, I am of a mind to conclude that Vanishing Point, by David Markson (Shoemaker & Hoard, 208 pages, $15)
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 28, 2014
How disgusting to learn that Common Core has finally infected our schools.  From what I have seen and heard and read about it, I'd say a more appropriate name for Common Core would be "Communist Core" since in one way or another it tends to undermine so many of the treasured core values on which America was built and which lead to our greatness. Destroying that greatness was the primary goal of the many Communists who came here after the Russian Revolution.  Now, regardless of their parent's wishes, new generations of American school children will learn the teachings of Karl Marx and Lenin as re-packaged by the likes of Community Organizer Saul Alinsky to replace the teachings of America's founding fathers.
NEWS
By Tim Baker | September 17, 1990
Budapest. A HUGE bronze statue of Karl Marx dominates the central foyer of the Budapest University of Economics on the banks of the Danube in this ancient Eastern European capital struggling to find its way from a stifling communism to a prosperous free-enterprise system. The old ideologue sits on his marble pedestal and reaches out his hand in a gesture of earnest objection. But on this first day of classes as the new semester begins, the young Hungarian college students pay him no attention.
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