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By Roy H. Campbell and Roy H. Campbell,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 2, 1992
Anita Steen, owner of an East Coast advertising firm, loves high fashion and thinks nothing of dropping $800 for a skirt or $1,500 for a blazer.So one would think that her closets would be bulging with designs from Donna Karan, Karl Lagerfeld or Giorgio Armani.Think again. Ms. Steen has built a wardrobe of smart, snappy clothes that bear the Escada label."I started buying Escada about seven years ago and I love it. It is a very chic line made extremely well with fabulous fabrics," Ms. Steen said.
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By Jim Servin and Jim Servin,N.Y. Times News Service | May 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- A woman in black rushed up to Todd Oldham as he entered the paint-by-numbers show at the Bridgewater Lustberg gallery in SoHo a few weeks ago. "Of course, you'd be here," she chirped, throwing an air kiss to the 30-year-old designer. "Your work is so kitschy."Mr. Oldham, a native Texan who can look like a wholesome farm boy one minute and a Joe Orton punk the next, smiled his best Opie smile and walked away, slightly irked."Congratulations, you star," said Kachin Kobayashi, a fashion stylist.
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By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,N.Y. Times News Service | March 25, 1992
PARIS -- Showing pretty clothes is not enough. Many of the designers presenting their fall and winter collections here in tents in the courtyard of the Louvre are trying to suggest other things: the end of the world, for instance, or simply the end of fashion. This premature fin-de-siecle blues is expressed in somber colors -- black is in first, second, and third place, followed distantly by wine and brown -- and the unfinished look, usually called deconstruction and marked by torn edges.
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By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,New York Times News Service | October 24, 1991
Paris -- Some of the big fashion houses are setting off explosions that will be heard round the world with their spring ready-to-wear collections.The best designers here, like Christian Lacroix, mix practicality with imagination. He has toned down the creative blast that brought him to the head of the fashion column five years ago, but his clothes haven't lost their fizz.The colors still sizzle, and the patterns grab the eye with their mixtures of checks, stripes, heart shapes, ornate frills and flowers.
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By New York Times News Service | June 13, 1991
Fashion flirted with hemlines, toyed with dresses and re-established pants as major players of the season. But the strongest message from the fall shows in Paris, London, New York and Milan, Italy, was an affirmation of the jacket as the heavy hitter in the current fashion scene.Sure, there are changes. Shoulder pads are no longer as formidable as the ones football players wear. Jackets are not so oversized that they could accommodate a couple of sweaters and a wool shirt underneath. Some have pronounced curves, as waistlines nip snugly above jutting or gently flared peplums.
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By James Warren and James Warren,Chicago Tribune | April 9, 1995
It's inevitably intriguing to open plush design magazines and inspect the handiwork of men and women of impeccable taste.Then again, April-May Elle Decor is refreshing precisely because it asks 50 "friends," mostly big-time fashion trendsetters, about the spaces they absolutely detest."
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By AIME PALMER and AIME PALMER,PALM BEACH POST | October 16, 2005
In just a few years, Apple's iPod MP3 players have gone from geeky gadget to "gotta have it." But having the pricey gizmo may no longer be enough. This fall, couture designers from Chanel to Marc Jacobs are offering cases in calfskin, signature canvas, you name it - sometimes at more than $300 a pop. But is the average MP3 junkie ready to dish out more for a posh case than for the player itself? "Over the last year or two, the market has shifted on iPod cases," says Dean Constantine of XtremeMac of Weston, Fla. "It used to be that protection for the iPod was the most important thing.
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By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,New York Times News Service TC | January 27, 1994
The French haute couture shows were predictably either very, very good or horrible. A little less predictable was the fact that the heroes of the showing season were both Italian.Gianni Versace of Milan and Valentino of Rome went to Paris with lustrous collections. Versace incorporated modern elements in distinguished-looking clothes, while Valentino achieved the requisite couture look in elegant clothes of quiet refinement.Christian Lacroix upheld the glory of the French with a wildly imaginative collection that brought him the only standing ovation and caused him to be pelted with flowers like an opera diva.
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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | September 14, 1995
Long before Karl Lagerfeld stamped the double C logo on every Chanel bag, belt and button and the Vuitton fleur de lis became a knockoff cliche, a woman of discriminating style was known by the quality of her shoes and handbag. That meant perfectly crafted pumps and a structured purse of the finest leather. Those who could pay the price wore alligator -- the status turnout, a discreet message of belonging to the fashion sorority. The '30s, '40s and '50s were the dressy decades.Fashion evolved and we had the decades when plastic go-go boots, combat boots, sneakers and schlep totes became acceptable wear for a day in town.
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By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,N.Y. Times News Service | February 4, 1993
NEW YORK -- Seventh Avenue gave one of those parties eulogizing itself Monday night, and surprise, everyone seemed to have a great time. It was an awards ceremony sponsored by the Council of Fashion Designers of America.Though there had been some caviling when the recipients were announced a few months ago, that had ended by the time the awards were presented at the New York State Theater in a ceremony conducted with wit, style and heart.On stage, videotapes interspersed events of 1992 with fashion highlights and scenes from the party.
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