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By Woody Hochswender and Woody Hochswender,N.Y. Times News Service | October 30, 1991
PARIS - Pulled by some mysterious, irresistible force, hemlines have been falling.Is it gravity? Or fate? Why now, you say, when women are just beginning to feel comfortable in the shorter lengths?Indeed, store buyers and fashion editors in Europe for the spring showings were divided over the new silhouette. Even the designers seemed confused. This was the season of the great compromise hemline.Fashion is a little bit like trading futures: the clothes shown in Paris and Milan, Italy, in the past month are for spring delivery.
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By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
For years in the world of high fashion, to be elite was to be seen as successful. Exclusivity is what separated two relatively expensive and well-made items - say, a Gucci bag from a Coach bag. High-end, luxury merchandise was seen as being for the privileged or monied few. The rest of us were resigned to mall-shopping. But recently, a handful of high-end designers have been bucking that elitist trend, pairing up with mall-based retailers, department stores or chains to bring their clothes and their coveted labels to the middle-of-the-road masses.
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By Woody Hochswender and Woody Hochswender,N.Y. Times News Service | January 9, 1991
NEW YORK -- Women in the 1990s may be searching for quiet chic, but the desire for shimmer and sparkle cannot be entirely suppressed.Those who would not wear expensive jewelry around the neck or wrist think nothing of wearing today's glittering, gem-studded clothes. But these are not the galactic dresses of old Hollywood.Contemporary designers go beyond sequins and rhinestones to marry the techniques of jewelry-making to simple dress shapes.The jewel-like effects include shoulder straps of suede threaded through big chunks of Austrian crystal, faux-pearl straps or pearl-studded knits, and big 60s-style Lucite bangles, which crisscross the back, line the bare midriff or dangle around the waist as a belt.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff | December 6, 1998
Front-row seat for fashionMaybe your invitation to the Ralph Lauren show got lost in the mail.No matter. You can watch highlights of New York's recent fashion week in the comfort of your own home today on "7th on Sixth - Inside Fashion Week," a TV special airing at 2 p.m. on WBAL-TV.You'll see celebrities: Lauren Hutton is the host, and actress Sela Ward translates runway trends into real life. You'll see designers: Donna Karan, Anna Sui and Marc Jacobs show beautiful spring clothes for women and men. And there are bonuses for tuning in: makeup artists, models and pros reveal what's hot, new and very now.All this and no crowds.
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By Mary Rourke and Mary Rourke,Los Angeles Times | April 17, 1991
NEW YORK - It used to be that designers knocked off only the dead. Fashion's late super stars Madeleine Vionet, Cristobal Balenciaga and Norman Norell are still prime targets today.But apparently the etiquette is changing. Now, some of the best-known names in New York fashion people who ought to know better are imitating each other.For their fall 1991 collections, Donna Karan thought of Geoffrey Beene, Louis dell'Olio looked to Christian Lacroix and newcomer Zang Toi did his impressions of Karl Lagerfeld suits.
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By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
For years in the world of high fashion, to be elite was to be seen as successful. Exclusivity is what separated two relatively expensive and well-made items - say, a Gucci bag from a Coach bag. High-end, luxury merchandise was seen as being for the privileged or monied few. The rest of us were resigned to mall-shopping. But recently, a handful of high-end designers have been bucking that elitist trend, pairing up with mall-based retailers, department stores or chains to bring their clothes and their coveted labels to the middle-of-the-road masses.
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By Mary Rourke and Mary Rourke,Los Angeles Times | March 17, 1994
Every season, one show in Paris goes beyond fashion. It gives people a slice of Paris life they could never find on their own. This season, which ended Friday, the Xuly Bet show was the ticket. Staged on an empty floor of Le Samarataine, a local department store, and attended by all the usual suspects from the fashion industry plus a hundred or so of the designer's friends, it was a reminder of where style is born -- in the streets.Starting with Lamine Kouyate himself. He's the 20-something Mali native who designs the Xuly Bet collection.
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By Holly Selby | July 4, 1991
We've faded, fringed and patched denim. We've ripped, cuffed and cut it off.We've stone- , acid- and lava-washed it. Heck, one Tennessee company shoots holes in it -- and charges for the damage.Protesters flaunted denim in the '60s. John Wayne swaggered in it in the movies. Brooke Shields claimed she wore bluejeans over nothing. Rap stars wear bluejean overalls.But if you think nothing new can be done to denim, think again."Denim is becoming a fabric that has no time limits -- you can wear it anywhere, any time," says Carolyn Moss, associate fashion director for Macy's.
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By Edited by Catherine Cook and Edited by Catherine Cook,Knight-RidderChicago TribuneChicago Tribune | October 31, 1991
Model talkSupermodels, whose salaries and perks are at an all-time high, were at the center of a firestorm that was the talk of those gathered in Paris recently for the spring fashion shows.The controversy was over the astronomical fees that top models such as Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista and Christy Turlington are paid and the bonuses they command. In addition, there's a backstage feud brewing as less well-known models watch the supermodels strut down the runways wearing the best of each collection.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff | December 6, 1998
Front-row seat for fashionMaybe your invitation to the Ralph Lauren show got lost in the mail.No matter. You can watch highlights of New York's recent fashion week in the comfort of your own home today on "7th on Sixth - Inside Fashion Week," a TV special airing at 2 p.m. on WBAL-TV.You'll see celebrities: Lauren Hutton is the host, and actress Sela Ward translates runway trends into real life. You'll see designers: Donna Karan, Anna Sui and Marc Jacobs show beautiful spring clothes for women and men. And there are bonuses for tuning in: makeup artists, models and pros reveal what's hot, new and very now.All this and no crowds.
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By Amy M. Spindler and Amy M. Spindler,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 1997
When Bernard Arnault, the chairman of LVMH Moet Hennessy-Louis Vuitton, chose two young British designers to head up Christian Dior and Givenchy, the French Establishment could be a bit blithe. Arnault is press hungry, shows off his power, thrives on doing the unthinkable.But when yet another big luxury goods house, the Vendome Group, put Stella McCartney, 25 and British, in charge of its Chloe collection, it seemed like more than one man's eccentricities. It seemed like a trend.How will the French Establishment rationalize it this time?
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By Mary Rourke and Mary Rourke,Los Angeles Times | March 17, 1994
Every season, one show in Paris goes beyond fashion. It gives people a slice of Paris life they could never find on their own. This season, which ended Friday, the Xuly Bet show was the ticket. Staged on an empty floor of Le Samarataine, a local department store, and attended by all the usual suspects from the fashion industry plus a hundred or so of the designer's friends, it was a reminder of where style is born -- in the streets.Starting with Lamine Kouyate himself. He's the 20-something Mali native who designs the Xuly Bet collection.
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By Marylou Luther and Marylou Luther,Contributing Writer | August 6, 1992
Paris -- If the gods who rule Paris fashion got it right this season we're all going to get into the black.Haute hippie black at Gianni Versace. Corseted and see-through black at Chanel, Christian Lacroix and Thierry Mugler. Jet-beaded black bras at Yves Saint Laurent. Furred and feathered black at Christian Dior. And from Givenchy, the man who brought us Audrey Hepburn in the little black dress, the new mother-of-chic little black suit.For U.S. retailers here looking for clear, new fashion direction that they will buy later in the form of the couturiers' less expensive ready-to-wear, the other big news of the season is the overall endorsement of many skirt lengths.
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By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | December 18, 1991
Style is an elusive quality, easily recognized but defined only with great difficulty.Still, in years of observing the passing fashion parade, we have come to notice a few things about the art of stylish dress.We have noticed, for example, that the most stylish people do not always wear the most expensive clothes. Nor do the stylish mindlessly adopt every trend.Invariably, however, the stylish pay close attention to detail. They would no sooner be seen in sloppy sweats and dirty hair than they would run naked in the streets.
FEATURES
By Edited by Catherine Cook and Edited by Catherine Cook,Knight-RidderChicago TribuneChicago Tribune | October 31, 1991
Model talkSupermodels, whose salaries and perks are at an all-time high, were at the center of a firestorm that was the talk of those gathered in Paris recently for the spring fashion shows.The controversy was over the astronomical fees that top models such as Naomi Campbell, Linda Evangelista and Christy Turlington are paid and the bonuses they command. In addition, there's a backstage feud brewing as less well-known models watch the supermodels strut down the runways wearing the best of each collection.
FEATURES
By Woody Hochswender and Woody Hochswender,N.Y. Times News Service | October 30, 1991
PARIS - Pulled by some mysterious, irresistible force, hemlines have been falling.Is it gravity? Or fate? Why now, you say, when women are just beginning to feel comfortable in the shorter lengths?Indeed, store buyers and fashion editors in Europe for the spring showings were divided over the new silhouette. Even the designers seemed confused. This was the season of the great compromise hemline.Fashion is a little bit like trading futures: the clothes shown in Paris and Milan, Italy, in the past month are for spring delivery.
FEATURES
By Holly Hanson and Holly Hanson,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | December 18, 1991
Style is an elusive quality, easily recognized but defined only with great difficulty.Still, in years of observing the passing fashion parade, we have come to notice a few things about the art of stylish dress.We have noticed, for example, that the most stylish people do not always wear the most expensive clothes. Nor do the stylish mindlessly adopt every trend.Invariably, however, the stylish pay close attention to detail. They would no sooner be seen in sloppy sweats and dirty hair than they would run naked in the streets.
FEATURES
By Marylou Luther and Marylou Luther,Contributing Writer | August 6, 1992
Paris -- If the gods who rule Paris fashion got it right this season we're all going to get into the black.Haute hippie black at Gianni Versace. Corseted and see-through black at Chanel, Christian Lacroix and Thierry Mugler. Jet-beaded black bras at Yves Saint Laurent. Furred and feathered black at Christian Dior. And from Givenchy, the man who brought us Audrey Hepburn in the little black dress, the new mother-of-chic little black suit.For U.S. retailers here looking for clear, new fashion direction that they will buy later in the form of the couturiers' less expensive ready-to-wear, the other big news of the season is the overall endorsement of many skirt lengths.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | July 4, 1991
We've faded, fringed and patched denim. We've ripped, cuffed and cut it off.We've stone- , acid- and lava-washed it. Heck, one Tennessee company shoots holes in it -- and charges for the damage.Protesters flaunted denim in the '60s. John Wayne swaggered in it in the movies. Brooke Shields claimed she wore bluejeans over nothing. Rap stars wear bluejean overalls.But if you think nothing new can be done to denim, think again."Denim is becoming a fabric that has no time limits -- you can wear it anywhere, any time," says Carolyn Moss, associate fashion director for Macy's.
FEATURES
By Mary Rourke and Mary Rourke,Los Angeles Times | April 17, 1991
NEW YORK - It used to be that designers knocked off only the dead. Fashion's late super stars Madeleine Vionet, Cristobal Balenciaga and Norman Norell are still prime targets today.But apparently the etiquette is changing. Now, some of the best-known names in New York fashion people who ought to know better are imitating each other.For their fall 1991 collections, Donna Karan thought of Geoffrey Beene, Louis dell'Olio looked to Christian Lacroix and newcomer Zang Toi did his impressions of Karl Lagerfeld suits.
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