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Karen Hughes

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By SUSAN REIMER | April 30, 2002
KAREN HUGHES, President Bush's closest and most trusted adviser, is vacating her place at the center of power and returning to her home in Texas so her son can finish his high school career where he has grown up. Her decision has been widely interpreted as proof positive that a woman can't have it all, that Hughes made the choice many women make when trying to balance work and kids: the kids come first. There is a lesson for working women, and their daughters, in Karen Hughes' dilemma, but I am not sure that's the one. Rather, I think Karen Hughes is an example of how a woman can have it all. Hughes, a former television journalist, became Bush's communications director in 1994 during his first gubernatorial campaign, and in the years since she has made herself absolutely indispensable to him, so much so that he declared that he would not run for president if she would not agree to come to Washington with him if he won. Now, when she finds herself torn by family concerns, she has the cachet with the boss to cut a deal that will allow her to continue working closely with Bush while living in Austin; a deal that will keep both her president and her family happy.
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NEWS
By William A. Rugh | July 31, 2007
Karen Hughes has been unfairly criticized. Yes, she is the most senior official in the Bush administration responsible for working to improve America's image around the world - and that image is in trouble, as polls abroad show. It is therefore not surprising that many people have blamed Ms. Hughes, the undersecretary for public diplomacy and public affairs at the State Department since 2005, for failing to correct this problem. But that judgment ignores several important facts. First, the undersecretary of state does not control the half of the traditional public diplomacy budget that goes for broadcasting (it is under an independent board)
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 2, 2002
BOSTON -- I've got to hand it to Karen Hughes. I always knew that she was good at her job. I just didn't know she was this good. Talk about spin control. The way she's handled her resignation over the past couple weeks is enough to win the 5-foot-10 woman with size 12 shoes a role as prima ballerina. First she framed her exit as a matter of geography. "I want to take my family back home to Texas," she said, carefully phrasing the family decision as if they were "a little homesick" for a state rather than for each other.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas and Cal Thomas,Chicago Tribune | December 27, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Karen Hughes is not as visible as when she worked at the White House, or on two presidential campaigns, but her 16 months as undersecretary of state for public diplomacy and public affairs have given her opportunities to counter what she calls the "propaganda" that the media in many Arab and Muslim countries convey to their people about the United States. In a meeting last week in her State Department office, Ms. Hughes told me that she recognizes the difference between the Cold War, when "we were trying to get information into largely closed societies whose people were hungry to hear from us," and today, when "we're competing for attention and credibility in a very crowded communications environment."
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 14, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - President Bush might as well have asked Karen Hughes - his friend and longtime political adviser - to hold back Hurricane Katrina because he has assigned her an equally impossible task. In naming Ms. Hughes undersecretary of state for public diplomacy, the president wants her to improve America's image abroad and specifically in the Muslim world. The Bush administration believes that image has been distorted and the message concerning what America stands for is not getting out. The problem with this thinking is that the Muslim world's position regarding the United States is rooted in fundamental political and most especially religious doctrines that will not be changed by people many of them regard as "infidels" and worthy of death.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas and Cal Thomas,Chicago Tribune | December 27, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Karen Hughes is not as visible as when she worked at the White House, or on two presidential campaigns, but her 16 months as undersecretary of state for public diplomacy and public affairs have given her opportunities to counter what she calls the "propaganda" that the media in many Arab and Muslim countries convey to their people about the United States. In a meeting last week in her State Department office, Ms. Hughes told me that she recognizes the difference between the Cold War, when "we were trying to get information into largely closed societies whose people were hungry to hear from us," and today, when "we're competing for attention and credibility in a very crowded communications environment."
NEWS
By William A. Rugh | July 31, 2007
Karen Hughes has been unfairly criticized. Yes, she is the most senior official in the Bush administration responsible for working to improve America's image around the world - and that image is in trouble, as polls abroad show. It is therefore not surprising that many people have blamed Ms. Hughes, the undersecretary for public diplomacy and public affairs at the State Department since 2005, for failing to correct this problem. But that judgment ignores several important facts. First, the undersecretary of state does not control the half of the traditional public diplomacy budget that goes for broadcasting (it is under an independent board)
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,Sun Staff | April 30, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Only recently have people begun to associate the West Wing with primetime television. The West Wing -- that section of the real White House, not the show -- has been a source of intrigue since it was constructed as an addition to the presidential mansion in 1902. It houses the Oval Office, which is the president's personal workspace, and the offices of his top advisers and their staffs. The three-floor complex holds only a few dozen offices, none of them fitting for a chief executive officer of a major corporation.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Karen Hughes, the most influential woman ever to serve on a White House staff, announced yesterday that she will leave her job as a senior adviser to President Bush this summer to return to her Texas roots and to spend more time with her family. Hughes, whose title is counselor to the president, will become the first member of Bush's inner circle of Texas advisers to step down from the 15-month-old administration. Those who have followed Bush's political rise noted that Hughes has been an intensely loyal and trusted friend who has written many of his speeches since his days as Texas governor and has helped mold his image.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul West and By Paul West,Sun Staff | January 26, 2003
The Right Man: The Surprise Presidency of George W. Bush, by David Frum. Random House. 384 pages. $25.95. Loyalty means everything to George W. Bush. He made his national political debut as the family's loyalty enforcer during his father's '88 run. When he launched his own candidacy, he forced his chief strategist, Karl Rove, to sell his political consulting business. That way, Rove could give Bush all his time (and couldn't cash in on his Bush connection). In the Bush White House, taking credit away from the president is considered disloyal.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 14, 2005
ARLINGTON, Va. - President Bush might as well have asked Karen Hughes - his friend and longtime political adviser - to hold back Hurricane Katrina because he has assigned her an equally impossible task. In naming Ms. Hughes undersecretary of state for public diplomacy, the president wants her to improve America's image abroad and specifically in the Muslim world. The Bush administration believes that image has been distorted and the message concerning what America stands for is not getting out. The problem with this thinking is that the Muslim world's position regarding the United States is rooted in fundamental political and most especially religious doctrines that will not be changed by people many of them regard as "infidels" and worthy of death.
NEWS
By Jill A. Schuker | March 28, 2005
WASHINGTON - Karen Hughes, the influential senior adviser to President Bush who often is cited as his alter-ego, is poised to assume the position of undersecretary of state for public diplomacy, vacant for much of the administration's first term and ignored the rest of the time. This is a tremendous opportunity to integrate public diplomacy fully into policy-making rather than mere 11th-hour attempts at damage control. Mrs. Hughes' new responsibility in strengthening America's voice abroad requires an ear attuned to anticipating cultural differences by listening as well as educating outside of the strictures of formal diplomatic channels and government-to-government contacts.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 3, 2004
BOSTON - Is it possible that Karen Hughes is getting a little rusty? When she was the full-time communications director for the White House, Ms. Hughes was regarded as the supreme spinmeistress. Reporters actually got dizzy watching her pirouette in her size 12 shoes. But now the spin is looking more like a tailspin. On a day when hundreds of thousands of women and men filled the Washington Mall for the March for Women's Lives, she made an analogy between being pro-life and anti-terrorist or, conversely, pro-choice and pro-terrorist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul West and By Paul West,Sun Staff | January 26, 2003
The Right Man: The Surprise Presidency of George W. Bush, by David Frum. Random House. 384 pages. $25.95. Loyalty means everything to George W. Bush. He made his national political debut as the family's loyalty enforcer during his father's '88 run. When he launched his own candidacy, he forced his chief strategist, Karl Rove, to sell his political consulting business. That way, Rove could give Bush all his time (and couldn't cash in on his Bush connection). In the Bush White House, taking credit away from the president is considered disloyal.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 2, 2002
BOSTON -- I've got to hand it to Karen Hughes. I always knew that she was good at her job. I just didn't know she was this good. Talk about spin control. The way she's handled her resignation over the past couple weeks is enough to win the 5-foot-10 woman with size 12 shoes a role as prima ballerina. First she framed her exit as a matter of geography. "I want to take my family back home to Texas," she said, carefully phrasing the family decision as if they were "a little homesick" for a state rather than for each other.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 30, 2002
KAREN HUGHES, President Bush's closest and most trusted adviser, is vacating her place at the center of power and returning to her home in Texas so her son can finish his high school career where he has grown up. Her decision has been widely interpreted as proof positive that a woman can't have it all, that Hughes made the choice many women make when trying to balance work and kids: the kids come first. There is a lesson for working women, and their daughters, in Karen Hughes' dilemma, but I am not sure that's the one. Rather, I think Karen Hughes is an example of how a woman can have it all. Hughes, a former television journalist, became Bush's communications director in 1994 during his first gubernatorial campaign, and in the years since she has made herself absolutely indispensable to him, so much so that he declared that he would not run for president if she would not agree to come to Washington with him if he won. Now, when she finds herself torn by family concerns, she has the cachet with the boss to cut a deal that will allow her to continue working closely with Bush while living in Austin; a deal that will keep both her president and her family happy.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 3, 2004
BOSTON - Is it possible that Karen Hughes is getting a little rusty? When she was the full-time communications director for the White House, Ms. Hughes was regarded as the supreme spinmeistress. Reporters actually got dizzy watching her pirouette in her size 12 shoes. But now the spin is looking more like a tailspin. On a day when hundreds of thousands of women and men filled the Washington Mall for the March for Women's Lives, she made an analogy between being pro-life and anti-terrorist or, conversely, pro-choice and pro-terrorist.
NEWS
By Jill A. Schuker | March 28, 2005
WASHINGTON - Karen Hughes, the influential senior adviser to President Bush who often is cited as his alter-ego, is poised to assume the position of undersecretary of state for public diplomacy, vacant for much of the administration's first term and ignored the rest of the time. This is a tremendous opportunity to integrate public diplomacy fully into policy-making rather than mere 11th-hour attempts at damage control. Mrs. Hughes' new responsibility in strengthening America's voice abroad requires an ear attuned to anticipating cultural differences by listening as well as educating outside of the strictures of formal diplomatic channels and government-to-government contacts.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Karen Hughes, the most influential woman ever to serve on a White House staff, announced yesterday that she will leave her job as a senior adviser to President Bush this summer to return to her Texas roots and to spend more time with her family. Hughes, whose title is counselor to the president, will become the first member of Bush's inner circle of Texas advisers to step down from the 15-month-old administration. Those who have followed Bush's political rise noted that Hughes has been an intensely loyal and trusted friend who has written many of his speeches since his days as Texas governor and has helped mold his image.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,Sun Staff | April 30, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Only recently have people begun to associate the West Wing with primetime television. The West Wing -- that section of the real White House, not the show -- has been a source of intrigue since it was constructed as an addition to the presidential mansion in 1902. It houses the Oval Office, which is the president's personal workspace, and the offices of his top advisers and their staffs. The three-floor complex holds only a few dozen offices, none of them fitting for a chief executive officer of a major corporation.
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