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By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A suicide bomber detonated a vest packed with explosives in a Sunni Arab mosque in Fallujah yesterday, killing 10 worshipers, including the imam, and shattering what had been a period of relative calm for a region once the most volatile hotbed of Iraq's insurgency. The attack at the end of evening prayers was the deadliest to shake Anbar province since Sunni tribal leaders began working with U.S. forces in recent months to purge Islamist insurgents. The U.S. military and a Fallujah police official blamed al-Qaida in Iraq.
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NEWS
By Ned Parker and Saad Fakhrildeen and Ned Parker and Saad Fakhrildeen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Bombs claimed the lives of at least 52 Iraqis and two U.S. soldiers yesterday, a day in which Vice President Dick Cheney and Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain made visits to Iraq to focus on American successes as the war enters its sixth year. Initial reports said a female suicide bomber killed 43 people and wounded 74 in the Shiite Muslim holy city of Karbala. Karbala province media director Abdel Ameer Hamoun said the woman detonated the explosives in the early evening on a street packed with shoppers not far from the Imam Hussein tomb, one of the holiest places in Shiite Islam.
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NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2007
BAGHDAD -- The death toll for Iraqi civilians and American forces rose inexorably yesterday as a car bomb ripped through crowds of worshipers in the Shiite shrine city of Karbala, killing at least 60 people, and U.S. military authorities announced the deaths of nine soldiers and Marines. U.S. deaths have surged in April. Details were sketchy of the Karbala attack, the second in the city this month. The car bomb apparently exploded at the checkpoint closest to a mosque that is one of Shiite Islam's holiest shrines.
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,Los Angeles Times | November 3, 2007
FORT JACKSON, S.C. -- Seizing on the decline in civilian and U.S. military deaths in Iraq, President Bush delivered an upbeat assessment of the war's progress yesterday, citing both the drop in violence and greater Iraqi control of restive provinces. But he conceded that corruption remains a problem, unemployment is high and economic improvement is spotty at best. "Slowly but surely, the people of Iraq are reclaiming a normal society," he told a cheering crowd of 1,300 soldiers who had just completed the Army's nine-week basic combat training course.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 29, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Roadside bombs, which have become the most lethal threat to U.S. troops in Iraq, killed two more American soldiers yesterday, one in the capital and another near the volatile Sunni Muslim town of Fallujah. The Baghdad attack claimed the lives of two Iraqi children. Meanwhile, the death toll in a series of car bomb and rocket attacks a day earlier in the southern city of Karbala rose to 19 - seven coalition soldiers and 12 Iraqis. Throughout the day, funeral processions wound their way through the streets of the Shiite Muslim holy city, and medical officials said that many of the nearly 200 people wounded remained hospitalized.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 8, 2004
KARBALA, Iraq - U.S. soldiers battled insurgents led by a rebel Shiite cleric yesterday, killing scores of Iraqis in a continuing offensive south of Baghdad. The Americans pursued Muqtada al-Sadr's militia forces in the warrens and alleyways of two of the holiest Shiite cities, Karbala and Najaf, where the rebels have barricaded themselves for more than a month. Militiamen fired rocket-propelled grenades and AK-47s at more than 100 soldiers, who moved low along walls and inched down a mile-long stretch of road, returning fire as roadside bombs exploded near them.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Said al-Rifai and Tracy Wilkinson and Said al-Rifai,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2003
KARBALA, Iraq - Suicide bombers in four vehicles launched a multipronged attack yesterday on U.S. allies in this southern holy city, killing 13 people and wounding more than 170, officials said. Killed were six soldiers from the U.S.-led coalition - four Bulgarians and two Thais - and six Iraqi police officers and one Iraqi civilian. Scores of Iraqi police officers and five U.S. soldiers were among the wounded, officials said. It was one of the largest and most brazen assaults by guerrillas fighting the U.S. occupation in weeks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 22, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - American troops helping the Iraqi police during a raid on a mosque in Karbala yesterday morning arrested 32 supporters of a fundamentalist Shiite cleric who has openly defied the United States. The men, followers of Sheik Moktada al-Sadr, had sought refuge in the al-Mukayam mosque Oct. 14 after a gunbattle with followers of a rival cleric. "These are criminal elements," said Lt. Col. George Krivo, a spokesman for the military here. "Illegal weapons were also seized." No casualties were reported.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Saad Fakhrildeen and Ned Parker and Saad Fakhrildeen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 18, 2008
BAGHDAD -- Bombs claimed the lives of at least 52 Iraqis and two U.S. soldiers yesterday, a day in which Vice President Dick Cheney and Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain made visits to Iraq to focus on American successes as the war enters its sixth year. Initial reports said a female suicide bomber killed 43 people and wounded 74 in the Shiite Muslim holy city of Karbala. Karbala province media director Abdel Ameer Hamoun said the woman detonated the explosives in the early evening on a street packed with shoppers not far from the Imam Hussein tomb, one of the holiest places in Shiite Islam.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Raed el-Rafei and Borzou Daragahi and Raed el-Rafei,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 30, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- As Shiite Arabs observe the important holiday of Ashura, they stand at a critical juncture, one marked both by potential peril and once-unimaginable opportunity for their sect, long considered second-class citizens in the Sunni-dominated Middle East. Ashura, the 10-day religious festival that culminates today and commemorates the martyrdom of Imam Hossein in the seventh century, has leaped in importance in the Arab world since the U.S.-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein and his Sunni regime in 2003.
NEWS
By Christian Berthelsen and Christian Berthelsen,Los Angeles Times | October 28, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S. military officials said yesterday that they were turning over security for Karbala province south of Baghdad to Iraqi security forces tomorrow, which will mark the eighth of Iraq's 18 provinces in which Iraqis have assumed control. The move has been delayed several times as violence has continued to erupt there. Also, Iraq's prime minister pledged yesterday to protect and support the Christian minority, which has been fleeing the chaos and sectarian violence in the country.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 30, 2007
Baghdad -- Radical Shiite Muslim cleric Muqtada al-Sadr ordered his Mahdi Army militia yesterday to halt hostilities for six months in order to restore its credibility in the eyes of Iraqis shaken by a deadly outbreak of Shiite-on-Shiite violence. The unexpected move by the anti-American cleric, coupled with a vow to cease attacks on U.S. forces in Iraq, might also have been aimed at elevating his standing among his countrymen and their neighbors by demonstrating that he has the power to make peace or destroy it. "I direct the Mahdi Army to suspend all its activity for six months, until it is restructured in a way that helps honor the principles for which it was formed," al-Sadr said in a statement from his stronghold in the holy city of Najaf.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2007
BAGHDAD -- A suicide bomber detonated a vest packed with explosives in a Sunni Arab mosque in Fallujah yesterday, killing 10 worshipers, including the imam, and shattering what had been a period of relative calm for a region once the most volatile hotbed of Iraq's insurgency. The attack at the end of evening prayers was the deadliest to shake Anbar province since Sunni tribal leaders began working with U.S. forces in recent months to purge Islamist insurgents. The U.S. military and a Fallujah police official blamed al-Qaida in Iraq.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,Los Angeles Times | April 29, 2007
BAGHDAD -- The death toll for Iraqi civilians and American forces rose inexorably yesterday as a car bomb ripped through crowds of worshipers in the Shiite shrine city of Karbala, killing at least 60 people, and U.S. military authorities announced the deaths of nine soldiers and Marines. U.S. deaths have surged in April. Details were sketchy of the Karbala attack, the second in the city this month. The car bomb apparently exploded at the checkpoint closest to a mosque that is one of Shiite Islam's holiest shrines.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Raed el-Rafei and Borzou Daragahi and Raed el-Rafei,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 30, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- As Shiite Arabs observe the important holiday of Ashura, they stand at a critical juncture, one marked both by potential peril and once-unimaginable opportunity for their sect, long considered second-class citizens in the Sunni-dominated Middle East. Ashura, the 10-day religious festival that culminates today and commemorates the martyrdom of Imam Hossein in the seventh century, has leaped in importance in the Arab world since the U.S.-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein and his Sunni regime in 2003.
NEWS
By PETER SPIEGEL AND GREG MILLER and PETER SPIEGEL AND GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Russian diplomats passed detailed, though sometimes inaccurate, tactical information about American troop movements to senior Iraqi officials even as U.S. troops closed in on Baghdad during the 2003 invasion of Iraq, according to Iraqi intelligence documents captured by the U.S. military that raise new questions about Moscow's role. One of the documents, which purports to be a summary of a letter sent to Saddam Hussein's office by a Russian official, claims that Moscow had "sources inside the American Central Command in Doha" - the U.S. military's headquarters during the war - that Russia used to convey American intentions and troop movements to Baghdad.
NEWS
By Christian Berthelsen and Christian Berthelsen,Los Angeles Times | October 28, 2007
BAGHDAD -- U.S. military officials said yesterday that they were turning over security for Karbala province south of Baghdad to Iraqi security forces tomorrow, which will mark the eighth of Iraq's 18 provinces in which Iraqis have assumed control. The move has been delayed several times as violence has continued to erupt there. Also, Iraq's prime minister pledged yesterday to protect and support the Christian minority, which has been fleeing the chaos and sectarian violence in the country.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2004
KARBALA, Iraq - After more than a week of intense combat here and amid intensifying scrutiny of military actions throughout the country, U.S. commanders said yesterday that they were withdrawing their troops from the besieged center of this holy city. In Baghdad, U.S. commanders strongly defended a missile strike near the Syrian border this week that reportedly killed 41 people, saying they believed they had hit a hideaway for foreign fighters and not a wedding party as claimed by Iraqis there.
NEWS
By Colin McMahon and Colin McMahon,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 29, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi insurgents struck again yesterday in Baghdad's Dora neighborhood, killing a police precinct chief. But Shiite Muslim pilgrims defied threats of violence and marched through the troubled area, waving their flags in pride and beating their chests in piety. The events captured two key aspects of the evolving Iraq conflict: The mostly Sunni insurgents are piling up victims among Iraqi security forces, particularly Shiites. But that has failed to deter the majority Shiites from pressing their religious and political agendas.
NEWS
By T. Christian Miller and T. Christian Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 20, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraq's Shiite Muslims marked their holiest day with emotional displays of faith yesterday, defying a bloody wave of suicide attacks that killed at least 54 people and wounded more than 130 others. In the sacred Shiite cities of Najaf and Karbala, religious celebrants scored themselves with chains and swords in memory of the martyrdom of Imam Hussein, the prophet Muhammad's grandson. Despite the violence, the public celebration of the Ashura holiday added to a sense of hope among some Shiites that has grown since January, when Shiite-backed political parties swept to victory in national elections.
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