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By Jody Roesler and Jody Roesler,Contributing Writer | October 29, 1993
Carlos Patalinghug fainted in a college genetics class when he saw the blood from his pricked finger. He's glad he did. If he hadn't, he might have gone to medical school, become a doctor and never created one of the newest things in exercise -- karate aerobics."
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NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2001
KEVIN MCMURTRY, 35, a local karate instructor, returned from Sydney, Australia, last year with a gold medal, a bronze medal and a broken toe. The souvenirs were related. More than 45 styles of martial arts exist, said Kevin's father, John. They range from the more familiar karate, popularized by actors like Chuck Norris, to Brazilian feet-only modes of fighting, said John McMurtry, who became interested in martial arts in the 1960s. Tae kwon do was the first martial art to be included in last year's Olympics as a formal event.
NEWS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,Staff writer | October 21, 1990
Former Western Maryland College football standout Joe Brockmeyer began setting football records at age 11 with the George Fox Little Buccaneers in Anne Arundel County in 1962.By the time he finished his college career at Western Maryland in 1973, Brockmeyer established three school rushing records that have stood up pretty well over the years."Records were more of a personal goal to better yourself. It gave me a competitive edge, but winning games was always more important," Brockmeyer said.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 1, 1993
The North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is a complex but vital . . .zzzzzzzzz.Whoops. Sorry. Dozed off.Actually, I don't know anything about NAFTA.I think it may have something to do with Canadians and Mexicans coming here to live in our houses, but I'm not going to worry about it until it actually happens.So instead of learning all about NAFTA today -- let's go to a movie!The first trick in going to a movie during working hours is getting out of the office.You can't just say to your boss: "Hey, I'm going to a movie!"
NEWS
December 12, 2002
Agnes E. Karat, a retired American Institute of Banking administrator and former Hamilton resident, died Saturday of a heart attack at her home in Oxford, Pa. She was 80. Born Agnes E. Kushnerick in Jeddo, Pa., she was a graduate of Hazleton High School in Pennsylvania. She was also a graduate of McCann Business College in Hazelton. In 1948, she married Alexander J. Karat, a salesman, who died in 1978. Mrs. Karat was an administrator for 30 years for the American Institute of Banking in Baltimore, until her retirement in 1995.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | April 1, 2014
When Monique Washington-Jones was growing up near Richmond, Va., in the small town of Charles City, she and her younger sister took karate lessons from their father, who ran a coed martial arts school known across the state. There are family photos of her at age 2 holding nunchucks - a weapon that consists of a pair of hardwood sticks joined by a rope or chain - but her formal training didn't begin until she was 10. “The woman I am today is a direct reflection of my martial arts training,” she says of that family bonding experience.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | August 24, 2003
It looks like a piece of minimalist art, but those are samples of the seven, ascending achievement belts (white, yellow, orange, green, purple, brown, and black) hanging on one wall of Shotokan Karate Club of Maryland. It takes on average 3 1/2 years to progress from white to first-level black belt. Only about one in 300 students gets that far, according to Farid Amin, who regularly teaches at the club. Karate is a demanding pastime. Those who stick with it say the key is to not become too color- conscious.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | July 8, 1993
The guys thought they were pretty good fighters. But when they came up against Carlos Bedoya, instructor for the Westminster Karate Academy, they had met their match. Amid screaming cheers and laughter, Mr. Bedoya demonstrated his craft yesterday to about 100 Carroll County 4-H campers by "fighting" with volunteers from the audience. Each punch and kick was delivered just inches from his targets, causing them all to duck and flinch. "Just do what I did -- run!" advised one of the boys as his comrade warily eyed the 28-year-old karate master.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | February 9, 1995
A Brooklyn Park man sued a Harundale karate school yesterday for $1 million, charging that a kick from his instructor broke his nose, jaw and cheekbone and forced him to miss a month of work.Joseph Gill Gadow, 32, of the 4900 block of Brookwood Road alleges that Brian Soe, an instructor at Kim's Karate in Harundale Mall "maliciously" kicked him in the face in 1994, causing the injuries.Mr. Gadow, a first-degree black belt, agreed on July 7, 1994, to spar with Mr. Soe, who is a third-degree black belt.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | December 5, 2003
NAJIB AMIN will live forever or die trying. He is 71 years old and still putting the kids through their paces. Sometimes they think he's not talking their language. But there are days, like last week with Julian Harris, where they come back to tell Amin he was right, and look how their lives are working out. Julian came in from Chicago. Amin remembers him as puffed up, exploding with energy, bragging to everybody in the locker room that he was better than they were. You never know about kids.
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