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By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 5, 1996
LOTS OF CHILDREN take karate lessons. Some even stick with it long enough to move up one or two degrees, earning more than one belt.But a young Severna Park resident has set a record at the Kick Connection in Pasadena. Five days before his seventh birthday on Aug. 29, Gregory Aiken became the club's youngest black belt. He earned eight belts to get to this level.Gregory, the son of Jerry and Sandy Aiken, began lessons at age 3 and has won 40 trophies.The second-grader at Calvary Baptist Academy hopes to take his karate prowess to the 1997 Junior Olympics.
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By Janene Holzberg | April 1, 2014
When Monique Washington-Jones was growing up near Richmond, Va., in the small town of Charles City, she and her younger sister took karate lessons from their father, who ran a coed martial arts school known across the state. There are family photos of her at age 2 holding nunchucks - a weapon that consists of a pair of hardwood sticks joined by a rope or chain - but her formal training didn't begin until she was 10. “The woman I am today is a direct reflection of my martial arts training,” she says of that family bonding experience.
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By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2001
PETER HILTZ, headmaster of Ake No Myojo Budo Inc., Morning Star Martial Arts in Eldersburg, has won two awards in a major karate competition. He won third place in forms competition and fourth place in the Senior Blackbelt weapons division at the 15th annual International Shorinjiryu Shinzen karate tournament in New York City this month. Hiltz is a fourth-degree black belt and chief instructor at Morning Star and conducts classes for Sykesville Parks and Recreation. The Shorinjiryu Shinzen tournament included more than 200 practitioners from the United States, Canada, India and other Shorinjiryu schools.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Hans C. Kliemisch, a 10th-degree black belt who established three karate studios, died Feb. 25 of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Essex resident was 84. Mr. Kliemisch was born and raised in the Bronx, N.Y., where he attended public schools. "He lied about his age and served in the Army during World War II," said his daughter, Kimberly Moss of Virginia Beach, Va. "He later served in the Navy during the Korean War. " In 1954, Mr. Kliemisch moved to Baltimore and went to work at Sparrows Point in Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s tin mill, from which he retired in 1999.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 1997
My 6-year-old son has been enrolled in a karate class for almost a year.Can karate be harmful to his physical development?How about soccer, gymnastics and other organized athletic activities?With a few exceptions -- boxing and weightlifting come immediately to mind -- it is perfectly safe for a young child to participate in sports, provided a few guidelines are followed:The sport should be fun for the child and the motivation should come from the child, rather than a parent or coach.The sport should not take all the child's free time.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Sun Reporter | April 10, 2008
When David Klotz was 5, he didn't care much about football. He was more interested in playing Power Rangers and Ninja Turtles. Klotz found just the right outlet, too: karate. It taught him the moves a young Power Ranger wannabe loved, but it also helped him develop the discipline, agility, power and physical control that would come in handy years later as a center on Wilde Lake's football team. "Overall, it's the stances, getting low, working out and flexibility," said Klotz, a senior.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1996
A Severn man who imitated what he saw in a Bruce Lee karate movie pleaded guilty Friday in Anne Arundel Circuit Court to bashing in the face of a youth last summer.Charles Randolph, 18, of the 1800 block of Quebec Road, who was convicted of assault with intent to maim, will be sentenced Feb. 27 by Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr.Randolph attacked Anthony Scherer, 15, near his home in the 1700 block of Village Square Court in Severn on Aug. 16. Police say two others also attacked the boy.The youth underwent 10 hours of surgery for a concussion and other head injuries at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2000
Ryan Pinkston loved the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, those cartoon superheroes who surfaced on television in the late 1980s. At 4, he scooted around, emulating the Turtles' karate chops, leaping at imaginary foes, and delivering yells and grunts intended to scare bad guys. "He'd imitate them all the time. He was always talking about karate," said his mother, Linda Pinkston. Catering to this passion, she and husband, Mark, let Ryan, now 12, try a few lessons at a Laurel-area karate school with a friend's daughter.
NEWS
By Melissa Manware and Melissa Manware,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 28, 2002
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - Irwin Carmichael uses a Palm Pilot every morning to figure out which uniform he needs to wear. Carmichael, 37, has as many jobs as most people do meals a day. He's a full-time Charlotte firefighter, a part-time Mecklenburg County sheriff's deputy and an eighth-degree black belt who teaches karate at several Charlotte area schools. "I always tell people I haven't figured out what I want to be when I grow up," he said. "Each job has different rewards." Carmichael sees a connection in all his careers - helping people be safe.
NEWS
April 7, 1992
At 3 feet 7 inches, Ashley Briggs is the smallest kid in her fifth-grade class. But last weekend, she was head and shoulders above the competition.Ashley, a 10-year-old blue belt from Severna Park, captured first place in the forms category in her age bracket in the JohnBurdyck National Karate Tournament at Essex Community College.The Folger McKenzie Elementary student was one of two girls among21 competitors in the 9- to 10-year-old class.It was Ashley's first tournament since she began studying karate in July 1990.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Sun Reporter | April 10, 2008
When David Klotz was 5, he didn't care much about football. He was more interested in playing Power Rangers and Ninja Turtles. Klotz found just the right outlet, too: karate. It taught him the moves a young Power Ranger wannabe loved, but it also helped him develop the discipline, agility, power and physical control that would come in handy years later as a center on Wilde Lake's football team. "Overall, it's the stances, getting low, working out and flexibility," said Klotz, a senior.
FEATURES
By Carolyn Peirce and Carolyn Peirce,Sun Reporter | March 2, 2007
Ryan Pinkston's life is just like that of any 19-year-old's - except that on any given day, he may read a screenplay, stop by a few auditions or call up his buddy Ashton Kutcher. A really good day might include kissing Carmen Electra. Pinkston may not yet have achieved the fame of his friend Kutcher, but his face is instantly recognizable to anyone who has watched the hidden-camera hit Punk'd. These days, the Columbia native is living in Los Angeles while searching for his next step toward stardom.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,sun television critic | August 28, 2006
The 58th Primetime Emmy Awards opened last night under a cloud of controversy surrounding a new voting system that resulted in some widely ridiculed nominees. Ultimately, however, the best talent won out - and viewers were presented with a witty telecast. Fox's 24, the clock-is-ticking thriller that this fall will spawn a raft of imitators, took top honors as best drama, with Kiefer Sutherland, who plays federal agent Jack Bauer, winning as best dramatic actor. Jon Cassar also won as best director for his work on the series.
NEWS
BY A BALTIMORESUN.COM STAFF REPORTER | March 13, 2006
Baltimore County police have arrested Jacob Davis Jr., 51, of the 4600 block of Sherwood Mills Road in Owings Mills and charged him with sexually abusing a 9-year-old girl, authorities said today. The alleged abuse took place from 1999 through 2001 at the victim's former home in Bel Air, at Davis' former apartment in Owings Mills and at his karate school on Reisterstown Road in Owings Mills, police said. They are asking others who may have been abused by Davis and have not yet come forward to contact the family crimes unit at 410-853-3650.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 2005
While driving to Northern Virginia on a weekend in late July, Dan Ricker realized that he knew little about a martial arts tournament he had entered. Ricker was not sure of much more than the competition would feature tough opponents in the relatively unknown sport of submission grappling, a no-holds-barred combination of jiu-jitsu and wrestling. Ricker, who lives on the Howard County side of Sykesville, found a big surprise waiting for him in Chantilly, Va. The competition wasn't just a high-level competition in a sport he had taken up less than three months earlier.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2005
You might blame it on Greece in the '70s. On those sun-bleached, languorous days when Fee Hughes was getting her Ph.D. in "leisure time management" and socializing with a lively American actress who lived upstairs from her in Athens. Jessica Dublin had recently appeared in Fellini's Satyricon and was a passionate aficionado of Scrabble. She introduced the young "living room" player from Baltimore to a form of "combat" Scrabble waged with four or five dictionaries. "Her approach was to cut off as many avenues for scoring as possible," Hughes recalls.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
Robert Franklin Miller, a con artist who has posed as a chiropractor, a lawyer and a world karate champion, was convicted this week in connection with another fraudulent scheme. He pleaded guilty Tuesday in Baltimore County Circuit Court to four counts of felony theft -- charges that stem from a phony real estate business he operated from the summer of 2001 through the spring of 2002. Miller is scheduled to be sentenced March 16 and under terms of the plea agreement could receive up to 12 years in prison.
NEWS
December 19, 1990
Anne Revere, an actress who won acclaim for her screen portrayals of wise, protective motherly characters until her career was cut short by the 1950s Communist blacklist, died Monday at her home in Locust Valley, N.Y. She was 87. The stately, spirited character actress won a 1945 Academy Award as the mother of Elizabeth Taylor in "National Velvet." Miss Revere was also nominated for supporting Oscars for playing the mothers of Jennifer Jones in "The Song of Bernadette" (1943) and of Gregory Peck in "Gentleman's Agreement" (1947)
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
Robert Franklin Miller, a con artist who has posed as a chiropractor, a lawyer and a world karate champion, was convicted this week in connection with another fraudulent scheme. He pleaded guilty Tuesday in Baltimore County Circuit Court to four counts of felony theft -- charges that stem from a phony real estate business he operated from the summer of 2001 through the spring of 2002. Miller is scheduled to be sentenced March 16 and under terms of the plea agreement could receive up to 12 years in prison.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2004
"It is a fun sport, an art, a discipline, a recreational or social activity, a fitness program, a means of self-defense or combat, and a way of life." That description of judo, from a Web site about that martial art, applies in essence to most martial arts - a simplification that may bug some who specialize in one of them or another. And there are dozens of martial arts. Which is just one factor that, frankly, bewilders lots of folks about the martial arts. (Not to mention those double vowels or the multiple spellings caused by varying translation into English of Chinese, Japanese or Korean characters.
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