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By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | November 20, 1994
BELGRADE -- Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic escaped an assassination attempt by Serbs with unspecified links to Belgrade, well-placed sources disclosed here yesterday. The plotters were seized by Dr. Karadzic's security agents, and it is possible that one has been executed.It is not known how close the would-be assassins came to killing the Bosnian Serb leader during the attack, which is believed to have taken place in western Bosnia recently.The incident has been hushed up. No mention of it has appeared in the media.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 1, 2008
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - Thirteen years after his indictment as a war criminal, the former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, shorn of the long hair and bushy beard that disguised him during his years as a fugitive, finally appeared before an international court yesterday to answer charges of genocide. Karadzic, 63, who was transferred early Wednesday from Serbia to a jail cell near here, was gaunt and unsmiling, in contrast to his years as the swaggering leader of the Bosnian Serbs, one of the men most closely associated with the horrors of the Yugoslav conflict.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 1998
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The wife of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic added to the speculation yesterday surrounding her husband's possible surrender to a war crimes court, saying Karadzic will "never" give himself up.Ljiljana Karadzic's defense of her husband was echoed by his closest political ally, Momcilo Krajisnik, the Bosnian Serb member of Bosnia-Herzegovina's three-person presidency.But reports in Belgrade suggested that Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic has been drawn into negotiations aimed at easing Karadzic's surrender.
NEWS
July 23, 2008
Some crimes horrify because of their brutality, others because of the sheer number of their victims. The alleged crimes of Radovan Karadzic, the Bosnian Serb leader accused of orchestrating Europe's worst massacre since World War II, were a mad stew of cruelty and mass murder that made the term "ethnic cleansing" synonymous with evil. This week, after a decade-long manhunt, Serbian police finally arrested Mr. Karadzic on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity. His capture, though long delayed, should send a message to tyrants everywhere: You can run, you can hide, but sooner or later you will be found and called to account for your despicable actions.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 1996
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The senior mediator in charge of implementing the Bosnian peace accord intensified his pressure yesterday on Radovan Karadzic, claiming that the Bosnian Serb leader has agreed to step down.But the hard-liners who surround Karadzic at Bosnian Serb headquarters here insisted that their self-declared president is only relinquishing some of his duties.The murky political scene emerging late yesterday showed both the increasing effort of Western officials seeking to be rid of Karadzic, who has been indicted on war crimes charges, and the increasing determination of Bosnian Serb hard-liners to close ranks.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Setting the stage for a Bosnian war-crimes trial in an American court, the Supreme Court refused yesterday to block damage lawsuits against the Bosnian Serb leader, Radovan Karadzic.Without comment, the court left intact a federal appeals court ruling that clears the way for thousands of Bosnian Muslims and Croats to pursue their claims in a U.S. district court in New York City."It is safe to say that we are seeking hundreds of millions of dollars" from Karadzic, said Beth Stephens, a Rutgers University law professor who is handling one of the two cases.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 4, 1995
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Dr. Radovan Karadzic, the leader of the Bosnian Serbs, noted last week that the Roman Emperor Caligula once appointed his horse as a senator. "That horse," Dr. Karadzic said, "was more of a senator than Bosnia is a state."This was a graphic way of making a point that Dr. Karadzic has been determined to prove for more than three years -- that Bosnia does not really exist.Bosnia, of course, was recognized in 1992 by the United States and other Western governments, a move that set them on a collision course with Dr. Karadzic and his nationalist followers that has come as close as ever before to outright conflict since NATO bombed a Bosnian Serb ammunitions depot last week.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 1997
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, who has been indicted on charges of war crimes, oversees a monopoly on the sale of gasoline, cigarettes and other goods in Serbian-controlled Bosnia that earns him millions of dollars while depriving the government of tax revenues, Western diplomats and Bosnian Serb officials say.These officials say that Karadzic controls the monopoly through two companies he runs behind the...
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 3, 1996
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The man who led the Serbs into Bosnia's heart of darkness now resides in his own shadowland, holed up in a glum mountain resort while the world waits to arrest him for genocide.But Radovan Karadzic is still the dominant ruler in Bosnia's Serbian Republic, and the longer he remains in power, the more deeply he entrenches his policies of ethnic intolerance, opponents say.More than six months after the November signing of the Bosnian peace accord in Dayton, Ohio, Muslims in Bosnian Serb territory are still being forced from their homes and jobs.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | November 12, 1994
BELGRADE -- Signs of discord among Bosnian Serb leaders became clear this week after an emergency session of their parliament. The session was called to proclaim martial law throughout Serbian-held Bosnia. But after two days of heated debate, the legislators refused to follow their leader, Radovan Karadzic.Many deputies were openly hostile to the proposal, which would have deposited all power into the hands of Dr. Karadzic and his military chiefs. Instead a compromise was reached allowing a "selective" imposition of martial law when "vital Serb interests are threatened."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 1, 2002
LONDON - NATO gave notice yesterday to the former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, the most wanted man in the Balkans: His life on the run is about to become ever more perilous. For the first time yesterday, NATO-led peacekeepers conducted an intensive and public operation directed at rooting out Karadzic, who has lived for years apparently just out of sight of international forces. The troops set off explosives, lifted carpets and even searched behind a church altar, but failed to find him. Wearing black masks and armed with assault rifles, they swept through a hamlet near Celebici in a remote corner of eastern Bosnia, seizing three caches of weapons.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 2001
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina - This small town, with its pocket-size Orthodox church and tatty cafes, is Karadzic country: a place where indicted war crimes suspect Radovan Karadzic has long been viewed as a native son, a savior, a saint. But even here, where the Bosnian Serb leader lived at the height of his power during his country's brutal war, there is a weariness when people talk about Karadzic - as if they love him but are almost too tired to defend him. That matters, because Pale is a place where people generally see the 1992-1995 war through an exclusively Serbian lens, one in which the Serbs are the biggest victims and not the perpetrators of "ethnic cleansing" against Bosnia's Muslims.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 1998
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- The wife of former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic added to the speculation yesterday surrounding her husband's possible surrender to a war crimes court, saying Karadzic will "never" give himself up.Ljiljana Karadzic's defense of her husband was echoed by his closest political ally, Momcilo Krajisnik, the Bosnian Serb member of Bosnia-Herzegovina's three-person presidency.But reports in Belgrade suggested that Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic has been drawn into negotiations aimed at easing Karadzic's surrender.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 22, 1998
SARAJEVO, Bosnia -- Like pieces in a jigsaw puzzle, some of the most contentious elements in Bosnian peacemaking are starting to fall into place.The seating of a new, apparently cooperative Bosnian Serb government and a move by international mediators to impose decisions when no one agrees have given impetus to a 2-year-old peace process stalled frequently by separatist bickering.Yesterday, Western mediators unveiled a common currency that they have ordered Muslims, Serbs and Croats to accept.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 1997
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- NATO-led peacekeepers seized yesterday four key television transmitters controlled by hard-line Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic, putting his party's television station off the air because it had refused to end attacks against international organizations working in Bosnia.The troops surrounded the transmitters in an early-morning operation that came in response to broadcasts Sunday night suggesting that the United Nations war crimes tribunal is anti-Serb.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 25, 1997
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Moving to end a volatile power struggle that has increasingly sucked in NATO peacekeepers, the Western-backed Bosnian Serb president agreed yesterday with her hard-line rivals to new elections and shared access to state television.The agreement, brokered in Belgrade by Slobodan Milosevic, the president of neighboring Yugoslavia, was seen by international mediators as a breakthrough.The deal is aimed at resolving a stubborn impasse that pitted Bosnian Serb President Biljana Plavsic against allies of indicted war-crimes suspect Radovan Karadzic.
NEWS
August 16, 1997
THE CORRUPT rulers who hijacked Serbian nationalism for their own power and wealth, using crimes against humanity to entrench their hold, have learned and forgotten nothing.Slobodan Milosevic, the old Communist czar who plunged Yugoslavia into wars of dismemberment and butchery, has constitutionally stepped down as president of Serbia. But -- surprise! -- he re-emerged as president of federal Yugoslavia, which consists of Serbia and Montenegro. That was a figurehead job, when he wielded full power.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1996
LYON, France -- President Clinton threatened Serbia yesterday with renewed United Nations economic sanctions if it did not press Radovan Karadzic, the Bosnian Serb leader indicted on charges of war crimes, to step down from political office before the Sept. 14 elections in Bosnia."We want Mr. Karadzic, in the words of the secretary of state, out of power and out of influence," Clinton said at a news conference at the end of the summit of industrial democracies. "And we think that is very important."
NEWS
August 22, 1997
WHEN 350 heavily armed British and Czech soldiers, supported by United States helicopter gunships, invaded and disarmed six Bosnian Serb police stations in Banja Luka on Wednesday, they accomplished several things. The most decisive was dismembering the little Bosnian Serb republic of Srpska into two fiercely rival enclaves.In northern Bosnia, Biljana Plavsic is recognized as president, though without loyal forces. The other enclave is centered on Pale in eastern Bosnia, where the former president and indicted war criminal, Radovan Karadzic, rules as undisputed boss.
NEWS
August 16, 1997
THE CORRUPT rulers who hijacked Serbian nationalism for their own power and wealth, using crimes against humanity to entrench their hold, have learned and forgotten nothing.Slobodan Milosevic, the old Communist czar who plunged Yugoslavia into wars of dismemberment and butchery, has constitutionally stepped down as president of Serbia. But -- surprise! -- he re-emerged as president of federal Yugoslavia, which consists of Serbia and Montenegro. That was a figurehead job, when he wielded full power.
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