Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKangaroo
IN THE NEWS

Kangaroo

NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 2001
BOLLMAN BRIDGE Elementary physical education teacher Jim McCleary is a busy man these days. In addition to his academic duties, he coaches the Kangaroo Kids, a precision jump rope team. The team has been around since 1978, with McCleary coaching since 1983. Jumping rope is not just a schoolyard-game anymore. The team performs choreographed routines at area functions, including a Washington Mystics women's basketball game not too long ago. The team's favorite routine is one choreographed by Howard County resident Robby Moylan, a member of the team, to the Hamster Dance tune, from the animated Web site that features cartoon hamsters cavorting to a silly song.
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 6, 1991
Defendant: Vince Coleman. Crime: Allowing an opposing player to borrow his glove. Verdict: Guilty, of course.Welcome to another session of the Kangaroo Court.Star or scrub, bus driver or batboy, no one is above baseball's bizarre bastion of justice. And nothing goes unnoticed -- missing a sign, tripping on a foul line, wearing an ugly suit.Sometimes, it doesn't take much. In 1983, New York Yankees judge Don Baylor fined coach Don Zimmer. Why?"Just for being Don Zimmer," Baylor said.Once, San Francisco manager Roger Craig was fined for getting a taxi receipt after another passenger paid the fare.
FEATURES
By John Barry and John Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 12, 1994
The generation that Captain Kangaroo taught self-respect and empathy has let the big guy down.Thirty-nine years after Bob Keeshan brought his famous gentle whimsy to CBS -- imparting values of trust and mutual caring and affection through his associations with Bunny Rabbit and Mr. Green Jeans -- the Captain is shocked at how things have turned out. The generation he nurtured has not done nearly as well by its own progeny.In much the same terms expressed lately by disheartened baby-care guru Dr. Benjamin Spock, Mr. Keeshan says he sees American children as worse off today than they were when he debuted as Captain Kangaroo in 1955.
TRAVEL
By MARJIE LAMBERT and MARJIE LAMBERT,MIAMI HERALD | April 23, 2006
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA / / I went to the Sydney Fish Market to see what strange creatures I had been eating: barramundi and Balmain bugs. I found them amid an astonishing variety of seafood at one of the world's largest fish markets. Mounded on ice were more than two-dozen types of whole fish, steaks and fillets. There was smoked eel, sea urchin roe and several varieties of oysters, already shucked and displayed on the half-shell. There were tubs of calamari rings and squid tubes. And a lovely rose-colored octopus, its arms twisted to show off rows of perfect tentacles next to a sign that proclaimed "Sashimi quality."
NEWS
By Kathleen B. Hennelly and Kathleen B. Hennelly,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 10, 1996
Competing against more than 1,100 other rope jumpers, the Howard County-based Kangaroo Kids recently brought home 18 medals from the recent U.S. National Jump Rope Championship.The rope jumpers won four gold medals, seven silver medals, seven bronze medals and placed 27 times in the top 10 for all events in a championship held June 28-30 at Disney-MGM Studios in Orlando, Fla.The competition will be shown on ESPN Aug. 24.Kangaroo Kids is a 16-year-old organization based in Simpsonville near Columbia.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 1995
He didn't have enough at-bats to qualify, of course, but Curt Motton was batting .360, higher than American League leader Rod Carew, and the Orioles were gleeful about it.Imagine a reserve outfielder and right-handed pinch hitter challenging for the batting title.In the Orioles' kangaroo court in the clubhouse on that August day in 1969, the judge, Frank Robinson, suggested that the players petition manager Earl Weaver to play Motton in the remaining 42 games so that he would have enough at-bats to qualify.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | November 26, 1992
An attorney blasted the board that retires disabled police officers in Annapolis as a "kangaroo court" yesterday and threatened to have the city held in contempt for failing to hold a court-ordered hearing.Only four of the five members on the volunteer Public Safety Disabilities Retirement Board showed up, prompting lawyer Joel Katz to charge the hearing would be "improper and illegal."Although board Chairman John H. Fellowes insisted enough members were present for it to take action, Mr. Katz said he would ask a circuit judge to hold the city in contempt for violating terms of an order that required the full board to meet.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
Bob Keeshan, television's veteran Captain Kangaroo, returns to Western Maryland College tomorrow for a speech of the millennium.It's part of "A Day of Illumination" at the campus and the kickoff of a $40 million fund-raising drive to the year 2000. The day concludes with Carroll County's first laser show.Keeshan's address, "Defining Lessons," will be at 2 p.m. in Baker Memorial Chapel. Programs on technology and education will follow in the academic buildings. The laser show will be in the Gill Center at 8: 45 p.m. The events are free.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1997
The road to mediocre movies is paved with good intentions. Thus we get "Warriors of Virtue," this tale of sad little Ryan (Mario Yedidia), who wants escape from his restricted life and gets it in the form of a magic book that transports him to the land of Tao. There, the good guys, defended by five giant kangaroos who are trained to fight but not kill, are trying to keep an immortality-minded warlord (Angus Macfadyen, Robert the Bruce in "Braveheart")...
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2004
I remember my early childhood in black and white. Maybe it's because I'm a baby boomer who watched a lot of television. That's why when I think about Captain Kangaroo and his bristly mustache, his Treasure House set, his friends Bunny Rabbit and Mr. Green Jeans, I see it all in black and white. By the time color television was commonplace, I had pretty much stopped watching. But those grainy memories of perching daily before the glowing screen in the mid-to-late 1950s are woven into the fabric of my life.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.