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By Dexter Filkins and Dexter Filkins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 1997
NEW DELHI, India -- "Kama Sutra," the lavishly filmed story of four lovers in the 16th century, is mostly about India.But it's also about sex, and that's why almost no one in India has been able to see it.The film, named for the ancient Indian sex manual, is bogged down in a dispute with the country's censors, who have deemed it too smutty for the people's good.The fight has landed the movie's Indian-born director, Mira Nair, in an imbroglio with her own government, even as the film earns praise around the world as a sumptuous evocation of the nation's past.
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NEWS
June 17, 2007
The Bible is the No. 1 bestseller in American history, and today nearly two-thirds of Americans believe that this book holds the answers to all or most of life's basic questions. Yet this scripture is revered far more that it is read. Are you religiously biblically literate? Or are you among the majority of Americans for whom the Bible and other religious texts remain closed books? Take this religious literacy quiz and find out QUESTIONS: 1. Name the four Gospels. List as many as you can. 2. Name a sacred text of Hinduism.
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By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 26, 2004
CALCUTTA, India -- On a recent visit to one of this city's 20,000 prostitutes, the doctor offered a few pointers on escaping India's raging AIDS epidemic, beginning with the boudoir's most essential equipment. For one, her bed was 6 inches too high, he said. He sat against the edge of the mattress, feet flat on the floor, to demonstrate the optimum height. And the walls were the wrong shade of pink. Too hot. He liked the placement of the television, high in a corner overlooking the bed, and the radio on the windowsill, blaring Hindi film music.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 26, 2004
CALCUTTA, India -- On a recent visit to one of this city's 20,000 prostitutes, the doctor offered a few pointers on escaping India's raging AIDS epidemic, beginning with the boudoir's most essential equipment. For one, her bed was 6 inches too high, he said. He sat against the edge of the mattress, feet flat on the floor, to demonstrate the optimum height. And the walls were the wrong shade of pink. Too hot. He liked the placement of the television, high in a corner overlooking the bed, and the radio on the windowsill, blaring Hindi film music.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 4, 1997
To cut to the chase: no, the one where she puts her foot there and he puts his leg over here and she puts her other hand down there, and he somehow -- did they have chiropractors in ancient India? -- gets his lumbar region way over there no, that one isn't in the movie.Instead, Mira Nair's "Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love" is more a study of sexual politics, pre-colonial style, in a colorful, exotic and always fascinating lost world of 16th-century India. It's more fun to look at than it is to think about.
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By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the sun | April 19, 1998
"Aphrodite: A Memoir of the Senses," by Isabel Allende. Illustrations: Robert Shekter/ Recipes: Panchita Llona/ Translation from the Spanish: Margaret Sayers Peden. HarperCollins. 320 pages. $26. Isabel Allende's latest book, "Aphrodite: A Memoir of the Senses," should come with a warning label: Not for the abstemious or Puritanical. For those unfazed by such strictures, however, this is a book to revel in and savor. Delectable, enticing and humorous, "Aphrodite" is a yummy confection of language and sensuality.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | October 24, 1994
Like most people, I have my own particular memories of a first visit to Paris. I was 17, just out of high school and traveling through Europe with a group of 75 other teen-agers. When we hit Paris, my friends and I went straight to the cafes, where we tried to order red wine in carafes and smoke the impossibly foul Gaulois cigarettes. We didn't wear berets or black turtlenecks, but we were bohemians nonetheless.While on the Left Bank, we made frequent trips to the used-book stalls along the River Seine.
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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 8, 1998
In a world where college costs continue to rise faster than inflation and student loan payments can linger into middle age, the trend on many college campuses has been toward a nuts and bolts education that gives graduates immediately useful, salable skills.But meander through university course guides and Web sites this fall and you can still find some deliciously odd, entertaining and debatably useful courses being offered.Consider a graduate seminar in Stanford University's philosophy department: "Is Morality Too Demanding?"
NEWS
June 17, 2007
The Bible is the No. 1 bestseller in American history, and today nearly two-thirds of Americans believe that this book holds the answers to all or most of life's basic questions. Yet this scripture is revered far more that it is read. Are you religiously biblically literate? Or are you among the majority of Americans for whom the Bible and other religious texts remain closed books? Take this religious literacy quiz and find out QUESTIONS: 1. Name the four Gospels. List as many as you can. 2. Name a sacred text of Hinduism.
NEWS
By NORRIE EPSTEIN | April 12, 1992
I'll never forget the summer I first read "Little Women." Twenty-six years later, that memorable opening (" 'Christmas won't be Christmas without any presents,' grumbled Jo, lying on the rug") is a literary madeleine, taking me back to an earlier time when reading was an unmixed pleasure and a book a magical charm that sealed me off from the world.I recently turned to "Little Women" again, partly out of a need to recapture that old feeling -- I had just moved and felt lost and disconnected -- and partly out of a critic's curiosity to see if it "held up."
FEATURES
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 8, 1998
In a world where college costs continue to rise faster than inflation and student loan payments can linger into middle age, the trend on many college campuses has been toward a nuts and bolts education that gives graduates immediately useful, salable skills.But meander through university course guides and Web sites this fall and you can still find some deliciously odd, entertaining and debatably useful courses being offered.Consider a graduate seminar in Stanford University's philosophy department: "Is Morality Too Demanding?"
FEATURES
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the sun | April 19, 1998
"Aphrodite: A Memoir of the Senses," by Isabel Allende. Illustrations: Robert Shekter/ Recipes: Panchita Llona/ Translation from the Spanish: Margaret Sayers Peden. HarperCollins. 320 pages. $26. Isabel Allende's latest book, "Aphrodite: A Memoir of the Senses," should come with a warning label: Not for the abstemious or Puritanical. For those unfazed by such strictures, however, this is a book to revel in and savor. Delectable, enticing and humorous, "Aphrodite" is a yummy confection of language and sensuality.
FEATURES
By Dexter Filkins and Dexter Filkins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 1997
NEW DELHI, India -- "Kama Sutra," the lavishly filmed story of four lovers in the 16th century, is mostly about India.But it's also about sex, and that's why almost no one in India has been able to see it.The film, named for the ancient Indian sex manual, is bogged down in a dispute with the country's censors, who have deemed it too smutty for the people's good.The fight has landed the movie's Indian-born director, Mira Nair, in an imbroglio with her own government, even as the film earns praise around the world as a sumptuous evocation of the nation's past.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 4, 1997
To cut to the chase: no, the one where she puts her foot there and he puts his leg over here and she puts her other hand down there, and he somehow -- did they have chiropractors in ancient India? -- gets his lumbar region way over there no, that one isn't in the movie.Instead, Mira Nair's "Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love" is more a study of sexual politics, pre-colonial style, in a colorful, exotic and always fascinating lost world of 16th-century India. It's more fun to look at than it is to think about.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Staff Writer | October 24, 1994
Like most people, I have my own particular memories of a first visit to Paris. I was 17, just out of high school and traveling through Europe with a group of 75 other teen-agers. When we hit Paris, my friends and I went straight to the cafes, where we tried to order red wine in carafes and smoke the impossibly foul Gaulois cigarettes. We didn't wear berets or black turtlenecks, but we were bohemians nonetheless.While on the Left Bank, we made frequent trips to the used-book stalls along the River Seine.
NEWS
By NORRIE EPSTEIN | April 12, 1992
I'll never forget the summer I first read "Little Women." Twenty-six years later, that memorable opening (" 'Christmas won't be Christmas without any presents,' grumbled Jo, lying on the rug") is a literary madeleine, taking me back to an earlier time when reading was an unmixed pleasure and a book a magical charm that sealed me off from the world.I recently turned to "Little Women" again, partly out of a need to recapture that old feeling -- I had just moved and felt lost and disconnected -- and partly out of a critic's curiosity to see if it "held up."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1996
Bob and Jack launch their big show tonight, as the GOP convention concludes with acceptance speeches from nominees Dole and Kemp. Network coverage begins at 9 p.m., except on NBC, where even stronger forces are at work."
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By Kevin Cowherd | March 25, 2002
APPARENTLY, we have now reached the point in this country where everyone above the age of 8 is being issued a cell phone and told: "OK, get out there and have real LOUD, personal conversations in public." In the dairy aisle of my local Mars supermarket the other day, a woman -- dark hair, intense, in her early 30s -- was doing just that. Pushing her shopping cart with one hand and holding her Nokia with the other, she conducted an incredibly intimate conversation with someone named Ernie that could only be overheard by, oh, 300 other people.
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