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NEWS
January 4, 2005
On January 2, 2005, REBECCA M. "BECKY" (nee Schline) of Parkville; beloved wife of Nathan A. Kale and loving daughter of Evelyn I. Schline (nee Tillery) and the late William H. " BILL" Schline; devoted mother of Nathan Scott Kale and Lindsey S. Daniels; loving grandmother of Katelyn Kale. The family will receive friends at the family owned and operated MCCULLY-POLYNIAK FUNERAL HOME, P.A., 237 E. Patapsco Ave. (Brooklyn) on Thursday, from 10 to 11 AM at which time services will be held. Interment Cedar Hill Cemetery.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Liam Flynn's Ale House has all the ingredients to be a great Irish-American bar and restaurant. Its welcoming space, friendly crowd and commitment to local products - both at the tap and in the kitchen - are points in its favor. As a bar, Liam Flynn's is a success. As a restaurant, it's getting there. Scene & Decor Liam Flynn's sits on a rapidly developing stretch of North Avenue in Station North. Even from the outside, there's no questioning the type of establishment it is. From the name to the green and gold signage, the look is pure Irish pub. The visuals carry over inside, where dark wood reigns, flags line the walls and the bar is front and center.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
After years of being relegated through the purgatory of forgotten foods, kale has found itself in the spotlight for the first time in decades and is ready to prove it belongs there permanently. A crop of the ancients, kale has been cultivated for over 2,000 years and was the precursor to modern-day cabbage, brussel sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli. Easy to plant, harvest and propagate, kale was a favorite of both the Romans and the Greeks. The leafy green fell out of favor in many cultures in the last century, as more exotic cruciferous vegetables became popular.
ENTERTAINMENT
Casi Dow and For The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
This week's episode jumped right into this week's Quickfire Challenge, but with a twist. Padma announces that this will be an elimination QF and that one of them will be on the next flight outta New Orleans in the next few minutes. The cheftestants are joined by Food and Wine editor-in-chief Dana Cowin for the QF Challenge. They have to tackle some current food trends that she is sick of and prove to her that they deserve to be on the specials menu at your favorite corner bistro.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
The next time I have a recipe that calls for cooking greens until they are wilted, I'm going to use twice as much as i think I need - and even mix up the greens. I used all the kale from my CSA pick-up this week to make this recipe for Sausages with Kale and White Beans, and I could have used twice as much. I should have thrown in the half bag of remaining spinach, too.  Kale, which is some sort of cousin to collard greens, I believe, is a popular CSA veggie, and yet, I can't remember ever actually choosing to cook with it before.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | December 25, 1991
If you eat out or shop the vegetable stalls, the chances are you've seen it. Kale is often treated like the ugly duckling of the greenery field, ignored by otherwise budget- and health-conscious shoppers.Actually, the vegetable, a sort of green cabbage, has a long history of fitting into hearty international menus -- not just braised with chopped onions, meat stock and pork fat, Dixie-style -- but as an ideal ingredient for balancing casseroles.The only preparational trick is cutting out tough stems of the leaves.
NEWS
By Carol J. G. Ward and Carol J. G. Ward,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 20, 2000
Winter is the time for cooking greens, and among greens, kale is one of the mildest. Nutritionally dense and low-calorie, it can break the boredom of pale winter salads and add flavor to soups. Kale has a mild, cabbage-like flavor and comes in many varieties and colors. Most kale is easily identified by its frilly leaves arranged in a loose bouquet formation. The color of the leaves of varieties commonly available in the United States is deep green. There are ornamental varieties in gorgeous shades of lavender, purple and celadon green.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY. | April 26, 2006
When a bag of kale showed up on the doorstep, courtesy of our neighbors departing on an unexpected trip, it raised the age-old question: What to do? What to do? Somehow Asian flavors came to mind, a departure in our house where almost everything has a Mediterranean influence. With ginger root and a few other flavorings, this dish quickly came together. Pork chops were in the fridge, so they became the protein - but chicken would be a delicious substitute. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe and analysis.
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 17, 2006
The addition of stuffing creates layers -- of flavors and textures, of color and form -- that add new dimension to vegetables. The gorgeous longboats of purple Chinese eggplants get a faintly Middle Eastern treatment: here, a stuffing of walnuts and black kale flavored with cumin and pomegranate molasses. The walnuts give both structure and a nutty depth, and the spice notes provide intricacy; together, they allow the dish to play off the classic Mediterranean mezze muhammara, a creamy walnut and eggplant dip. Amy Scattergood wrote this article for the Los Angeles Times, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2002
Gay H. McCormick of Westminster wrote that she was seeking a recipe for Potato-Kale Soup. "It was once available from a company called Walnut Acres Organic Farm in Penns Creek, Pa., which has now gone out of business. Ingredients such as kale, potatoes, onions and more were listed on the can. I would greatly appreciate a recipe." Nancy Gabriel of Eldersberg responded with a recipe and a note: "I have used so many recipes over the years that were cut from newspapers - I'm glad to submit one."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
As we entered Week 5 of our Moon Valley Farm CSA pickups, I realized two things have happened. First, I am not panicking as much about what to do with all the vegetables. And we're eating more cleanly. Not familiar with the term "clean eating"? Neither was I. It was one of those phrases that I'd never heard before and then suddenly it seemed like everyone was expecting me to understand it. When I filled out some paperwork at the Maryland Fitness Club a few months ago, for example, I was supposed to note how many of my meals each day were "clean.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
The next time I have a recipe that calls for cooking greens until they are wilted, I'm going to use twice as much as i think I need - and even mix up the greens. I used all the kale from my CSA pick-up this week to make this recipe for Sausages with Kale and White Beans, and I could have used twice as much. I should have thrown in the half bag of remaining spinach, too.  Kale, which is some sort of cousin to collard greens, I believe, is a popular CSA veggie, and yet, I can't remember ever actually choosing to cook with it before.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | November 1, 2012
Now that the weather is cooling down and winter is approaching, it's time for comfort food, including stews. Stews are great because you can make a pot on Sunday and eat from it throughout the week. Stews can also be made in large batches to freeze for later. Our latest health recipe is White Bean and Kale Stew and comes from Whole Living Magazine. Ingredients 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 onion, diced 2 cloves garlic, chopped 2 carrots, peeled and diced 2 stalks celery, diced Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 can (15 ounces)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
After years of being relegated through the purgatory of forgotten foods, kale has found itself in the spotlight for the first time in decades and is ready to prove it belongs there permanently. A crop of the ancients, kale has been cultivated for over 2,000 years and was the precursor to modern-day cabbage, brussel sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli. Easy to plant, harvest and propagate, kale was a favorite of both the Romans and the Greeks. The leafy green fell out of favor in many cultures in the last century, as more exotic cruciferous vegetables became popular.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | August 8, 2011
Does it cost more to eat nutritious food? A University of Washington researcher found that customers who spent the most on their groceries were most likely to come close to meeting the federal Food and Drug Administration's recommended nutrition standards, particularly for potassium and fiber, according to this MSNBC story . (Thankfully, most were already within the range of calcium.) They also were more likely to stay within recommended levels of fat and salt. I was surprised by this finding, because I think there are plenty of things that would cost a lot of money --- like cheese and meat --- that are also high in fat and salt and sugar.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 17, 2009
Though it's nearly freezing outside, fresh arugula, kale and more greens are flourishing in Hoop Village. That's the name given to Baltimore's newest urban farming venture - a trio of plastic-skinned hoop greenhouses on the historic Lake Clifton schools campus. The structures, finished in October, are already yielding harvests that will provide wholesome snacks to some city elementary students this winter. And students at the three Lake Clifton schools are helping to raise the food they'll be eating.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER | November 12, 2009
The gardener's never-ending search for color, even in the bleak months of fall and winter, has brought cabbage and kale out of the kitchen and into the garden. With the help of hybridizers, these peasant vegetables have been transformed into the colorful stars of late fall. Their blue-green outer leaves can enclose gem-like centers that run the rainbow from creamy white and yellow to deep red, touching on pink and lavender in between. Or their deeply cut and spiky foliage can look like something fanciful from a coral reef.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | March 8, 2006
The strawberries and citrus fruit that Joe Bartenfelder is unloading at the Waverly farmers' market this bitter cold Saturday morning come from far away. But his deep-green, tightly curled kale is from right here in Maryland. "It's still our kale," said Bartenfelder, who operates farms in Fullerton, in Baltimore County, and Preston, on the Eastern Shore, where this batch of kale was grown. "Which is unusual, since it is February." Even for kale, a cold-weather crop for which Maryland's climate is perfect, harvests past Thanksgiving Day are noteworthy.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer On Gardening | November 12, 2009
T he gardener's never-ending search for color, even in the bleak months of fall and winter, has brought cabbage and kale out of the kitchen and into the garden. With the help of hybridizers, these peasant vegetables have been transformed into the colorful stars of late fall. Their blue-green outer leaves can enclose gem-like centers that run the rainbow from creamy white and yellow to deep red, touching on pink and lavender in between. Or their deeply cut and spiky foliage can look like something fanciful from a coral reef.
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