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By Los Angeles Times | April 5, 1991
NEWPORT BEACH, Calif. -- President Bush's meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu was a session laden with warm words about the U.S.-Japanese relationship but no signals of progress on the numerous issues that continue to divide the two nations.Indeed, the two made clear that on at least two issues -- Japan's contribution to help defray the costs of the Persian Gulf war and U.S. efforts to sell rice in Japan -- the gap remains wide. And the emotional issue of Japanese automobile sales in the United States was not even discussed, White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said.
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NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 27, 1991
TOKYO -- President Bush's oft-delayed first state visit here will meet up with something new in Japan-U.S. relations next month.For the first time in recent memory, Japan will have a prime minister who speaks his mind plainly and can do it in elegant English.The governing Liberal Democratic Party will assure that today when it crowns Kiichi Miyazawa's five decades in government by electing him its president, and thus prime minister-designate."The Americans are going to know just where they stand, which they've always said they wanted, but they're not always going to like it," said a foreigner who has been on the other side from Mr. Miyazawa in negotiations.
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NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | December 30, 1990
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu scored a lightning year-end victory over his governing party's political bosses yesterday by suddenly giving them a Cabinet reshuffling they had long demanded but by doing it on virtually his own terms.Japanese newspapers credited Mr. Kaifu with swiftly turning a brewing new political-money scandal into an unexpected chance to resist mounting demands by party bosses that he restore to power old faces that had been dirtied by the Recruit stock-for-favors affair of the preceding two years.
NEWS
October 9, 1991
The disconnect between Japan's citizens and the party bosses in seemingly permanent control of the national government is illustrated once again in the downfall of Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu.According to the latest opinion polls, Mr. Kaifu's popularity stands at a near-record 56.7 percent and the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, which he had rescued from a humiliating 1989 setback, is drawing 64.8 percent support -- the highest in its 38 unbroken years in power.Such figures, however, did not deter the self-perpetuating factions that dominate the LDP and parliament from deciding they no longer needed Mr. Kaifu.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 13, 1990
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu asked Japan's parliament yesterday for a new law letting him send soldiers to the Persian Gulf and to future hot spots where the United Nations works to "restore peace.""This crisis is a major time of testing for Japan and the most severe trial we have faced since the end of the war," Mr. Kaifu told the two houses of the Diet, which has been called into a special session primarily to help set policy in response to Iraq's seizure of Kuwait.Japanese newspapers billed the talk in advance as one of the central policy speeches of Mr. Kaifu's term in office.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | August 9, 1991
BEIJING -- When Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu arrives here tomorrow, China's leaders may be excused if they fall all over themselves to give him a warm welcome.The Japanese prime minister's three-day visit to Beijing will be the first by a leader of a major industrialized nation since the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989 sparked worldwide rebuke and the imposition of diplomatic, economic and military sanctions against China.Mr. Kaifu's visit underscores not only the importance of China for Japan, but also China's remarkably quick and artfully managed return to better graces with much of the world -- except the United States.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
TOKYO -- The secretary-general of Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu's governing party resigned yesterday after his candidate for governor of Tokyo took a whipping from an 80-year-old incumbent.Resisting two days of intense pressure to stay on from Mr. Kaifu and the chief power brokers of his own faction within the Liberal Democratic Party, Ichiro Ozawa insisted on taking responsibility for a backfired attempt to dump Gov. Shunichi Suzuki.To cheers of "Banzai!" -- 10,000 years, a traditional Asian wish of long life -- Governor Suzuki savored his lopsided fourth-term win yesterday morning at a victory ceremony at the recently dedicated, twin-towered City Hall.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 4, 1991
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu expressed "sincere contrition" yesterday for the "unbearable suffering and sorrow" Japan inflicted on "a great many" fellow Asians in World War II.Offering other Asians words they have waited nearly 50 years to hear, Mr. Kaifu made Japan's equivalent of gestures German leaders made to fellow Europeans more than a decade ago.He took the occasion of a major foreign policy speech in Singapore to utter the first unequivocal apology...
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | September 28, 1990
TOKYO -- Japan's Cabinet has worked out the basics of a plan to send soldiers to join United Nations operations in the Persian Gulf, Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu said yesterday.Mr. Kaifu said he would call the Diet, Japan's parliament, into special session to act on a bill that would allow uniformed soldiers to join in operations outside Japan for the first time since the U.S. occupation imposed a pacifist constitution on this country after World War II.Responding to relentless U.S. pressure to take a tangible as well as a financial role in resisting Iraq's occupation of Kuwait, Mr. Kaifu said the time had come for Japanese to be seen to "sweat" alongside other nationals in times of crisis.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
TOKYO -- The secretary-general of Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu's governing party resigned yesterday after his candidate for governor of Tokyo took a whipping from an 80-year-old incumbent.Resisting two days of intense pressure to stay on from Mr. Kaifu and the chief power brokers of his own faction within the Liberal Democratic Party, Ichiro Ozawa insisted on taking responsibility for a backfired attempt to dump Gov. Shunichi Suzuki.To cheers of "Banzai!" -- 10,000 years, a traditional Asian wish of long life -- Governor Suzuki savored his lopsided fourth-term win yesterday morning at a victory ceremony.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 5, 1991
TOKYO -- Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu is expected to announce later today that he will not seek a second term, raising the question whether a political leader here can exercise power and leadership in the Western sense.Close associates of Mr. Kaifu, who has led the country for two years, said he will step down as leader of the majority Liberal Democratic Party at the end of this month. The majority party's leader is automatically prime minister.Mr. Kaifu's decision followed a stunning setback last Monday when leaders of his own party unceremoniously scuttled a plan to reform Japan's scandal-ridden political system.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | August 9, 1991
BEIJING -- When Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu arrives here tomorrow, China's leaders may be excused if they fall all over themselves to give him a warm welcome.The Japanese prime minister's three-day visit to Beijing will be the first by a leader of a major industrialized nation since the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989 sparked worldwide rebuke and the imposition of diplomatic, economic and military sanctions against China.Mr. Kaifu's visit underscores not only the importance of China for Japan, but also China's remarkably quick and artfully managed return to better graces with much of the world -- except the United States.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 15, 1991
TOKYO -- Former Foreign Minister Shintaro Abe died early today, opening the way to a wide-open power struggle at the top of the governing Liberal Democratic Party for the right to succeed Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu.Mr. Abe, 67, had been the leading candidate to succeed Mr. Kaifu until last year, when his health began to fail after a bile duct operation.The struggle that will follow his death will determine whether a man of the middle-aged generation will succeed to the prime ministry some time this year, or one of the party's old-guard bosses who have long waited for the honor will manage to fight back from the disgraces of the deep scandals that abruptly lifted Mr. Kaifu into the post in 1989.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 4, 1991
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu expressed "sincere contrition" yesterday for the "unbearable suffering and sorrow" Japan inflicted on "a great many" fellow Asians in World War II.Offering other Asians words they have waited nearly 50 years to hear, Mr. Kaifu made Japan's equivalent of gestures German leaders made to fellow Europeans more than a decade ago.He took the occasion of a major foreign policy speech in Singapore to utter the first unequivocal apology...
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 25, 1991
TOKYO -- Japan will send six vessels to help clear mines from the Persian Gulf, the first overseas use of Japanese forces since World War II, Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu announced last night.Reached more than a month after the end of the gulf war, the decision will create the first tangible product of Japan's eight-month constitutional debate on how to add a "physical presence" to supplement its more than $13 billion in cash contributions to the coalition of nations that defeated Iraq and to countries affected by the war.Answering questions at a press conference, Mr. Kaifu struggled for the right balance -- between making the most, for Western consumption, of a modest and long-delayed physical contribution to security in the region that supplies most of Japan's oil and making the least, for domestic political consumption, of any change in Japan's 45 years of postwar pacifism.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 17, 1991
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu and President Mikhail S. Gorbachev gave top priority to their countries' toughest territorial dispute yesterday in the opening sessions of the Soviet leader's historic summit visit.The two leaders sealed the lips of all in the room, then tried for an hour and a half -- about half of their first meeting -- to find a last-minute way out of the dispute that has for four decades confounded all attempts to draft a peace treaty legally ending the two Sea of Japan neighbors' World War II state of belligerence.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 15, 1991
TOKYO -- Former Foreign Minister Shintaro Abe died early today, opening the way to a wide-open power struggle at the top of the governing Liberal Democratic Party for the right to succeed Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu.Mr. Abe, 67, had been the leading candidate to succeed Mr. Kaifu until last year, when his health began to fail after a bile duct operation.The struggle that will follow his death will determine whether a man of the middle-aged generation will succeed to the prime ministry some time this year, or one of the party's old-guard bosses who have long waited for the honor will manage to fight back from the disgraces of the deep scandals that abruptly lifted Mr. Kaifu into the post in 1989.
NEWS
October 9, 1991
The disconnect between Japan's citizens and the party bosses in seemingly permanent control of the national government is illustrated once again in the downfall of Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu.According to the latest opinion polls, Mr. Kaifu's popularity stands at a near-record 56.7 percent and the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, which he had rescued from a humiliating 1989 setback, is drawing 64.8 percent support -- the highest in its 38 unbroken years in power.Such figures, however, did not deter the self-perpetuating factions that dominate the LDP and parliament from deciding they no longer needed Mr. Kaifu.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
TOKYO -- The secretary-general of Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu's governing party resigned yesterday after his candidate for governor of Tokyo took a whipping from an 80-year-old incumbent.Resisting two days of intense pressure to stay on from Mr. Kaifu and the chief power brokers of his own faction within the Liberal Democratic Party, Ichiro Ozawa insisted on taking responsibility for a backfired attempt to dump Gov. Shunichi Suzuki.To cheers of "Banzai!" -- 10,000 years, a traditional Asian wish of long life -- Governor Suzuki savored his lopsided fourth-term win yesterday morning at a victory ceremony at the recently dedicated, twin-towered City Hall.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 9, 1991
TOKYO -- The secretary-general of Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu's governing party resigned yesterday after his candidate for governor of Tokyo took a whipping from an 80-year-old incumbent.Resisting two days of intense pressure to stay on from Mr. Kaifu and the chief power brokers of his own faction within the Liberal Democratic Party, Ichiro Ozawa insisted on taking responsibility for a backfired attempt to dump Gov. Shunichi Suzuki.To cheers of "Banzai!" -- 10,000 years, a traditional Asian wish of long life -- Governor Suzuki savored his lopsided fourth-term win yesterday morning at a victory ceremony.
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