Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKadima
IN THE NEWS

Kadima

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 30, 2006
ELON MOREH, West Bank -- On a hilltop overlooking the Palestinian city of Nablus, residents of this Jewish settlement wept and prayed yesterday at a memorial service for four residents killed by Palestinians in 2002, and in a sense, over Israeli voters' decision this week to tell Jewish settlers to abandon their homes. On Tuesday, Israelis voted into office the Kadima party, whose chief promise is to evacuate settlements such as this one. At yesterday's memorial service, the residents of Elon Moreh promised to honor the dead by never leaving.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John Murphy, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
Ariel Sharon, the daring Israeli general who as a field commander and prime minister became one of the most influential and controversial leaders in the Middle East, died Saturday. He was 85. Sharon, who had been incapacitated since suffering a severe stroke in 2006, was moved in 2010 to his ranch in the Negev desert at the request of his family. In September he underwent abdominal surgery, but his condition worsened this month as his organs deteriorated. Sharon's death at a hospital near Tel Aviv was announced by his son Gilad.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 2006
JERUSALEM --Ehud Olmert, the acting prime minister and the leader of the new Kadima Party, has been renamed Smolmert in an effort to label him dovish and left-wing (smol is Hebrew for left). Benjamin Netanyahu of Likud, the former prime minister known as Bibi, is pictured as shifty-eyed, bloated, anxious and untrustworthy, giving himself pep talks ("I can do this; I'm the Bibi"). Amir Peretz, the Moroccan-born leader of the Labor Party, is portrayed as an inexperienced socialist simpleton, with Israel's Russian-born voters reminded of how much he looks like Stalin.
NEWS
By Griff Witte and Griff Witte,The Washington Post | February 11, 2009
JERUSALEM -Israeli voters delivered a split decision in national elections yesterday, sparking competing claims by backers of opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu and Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni over who will be the next prime minister. Voters appeared to give Livni's Kadima Party, which favors negotiations with the Palestinians, a slight and unexpected edge over Netanyahu's Likud, which has been critical of peace talks, according to nearly complete returns and exit polls. But the overall shift in Israel's parliament, the Knesset, was sharply to the right.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Ehud Olmert's centrist Kadima party won the largest number of seats yesterday in Israel's parliamentary elections, ensuring that Olmert will become prime minister and be able to pursue his plan to give up some Jewish settlements in the West Bank and establish the country's permanent borders. Kadima's victory was muted by the party's winning fewer seats than polls had projected. But it broke the monopoly on leadership held since the country's founding by the center-left Labor Party and its predecessors, and by the right-wing Likud, the party Olmert left to join Kadima.
NEWS
By Griff Witte and Griff Witte,The Washington Post | February 11, 2009
JERUSALEM -Israeli voters delivered a split decision in national elections yesterday, sparking competing claims by backers of opposition leader Benjamin Netanyahu and Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni over who will be the next prime minister. Voters appeared to give Livni's Kadima Party, which favors negotiations with the Palestinians, a slight and unexpected edge over Netanyahu's Likud, which has been critical of peace talks, according to nearly complete returns and exit polls. But the overall shift in Israel's parliament, the Knesset, was sharply to the right.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2009
JERUSALEM - Less than a week before Israeli voters pick a new leader, the candidate most involved in negotiations with the Palestinians is on the defensive over newly reported details of an interim peace accord offered months ago by outgoing Prime Minister Ehud Olmert. Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni, the standard bearer of Olmert's centrist Kadima Party, was already trailing in the polls before the disclosures last week prompted the hawkish front-runner to accuse her of agreeing to "surrender" parts of Jerusalem for an independent Palestinian state.
NEWS
By JOEL GREENBERG and JOEL GREENBERG,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 28, 2006
JERUSALEM -- The centrist Kadima Party of acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert signed a coalition deal yesterday with the left-leaning Labor Party, forming the core of a new Israeli government expected to pursue a plan for the removal of Israeli settlements from large areas of the West Bank. Kadima won Israel's election March 28 but must build a coalition with other parties to gain a majority in the 120-member legislature. A coalition agreement was signed Wednesday with the Pensioners Party, and two religious parties, Shas and United Torah Judaism, are expected to join.
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 2005
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon was hospitalized last night after suffering a minor stroke, hospital officials said, adding a fresh element of uncertainty to a tumultuous political season in Israel. Officials at Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem said the 77-year-old prime minister was awake and speaking with family members and aides after undergoing tests. Officials said that, contrary to initial reports on Israeli television, he did not lose consciousness. Sharon remained in control of the government and had received a military briefing at his bedside, said his spokesman, Raanan Gissin.
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas met informally in Jordan yesterday, and aides said the leaders would hold official talks in coming weeks. The two leaders attended a breakfast held by Jordan's King Abdullah II as part of a two-day gathering of Nobel laureates and business and political leaders near the ruins of the ancient town of Petra. Olmert and Abbas shook hands and smiled for the cameras but did not delve into substantive matters, officials said.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | February 4, 2009
JERUSALEM - Less than a week before Israeli voters pick a new leader, the candidate most involved in negotiations with the Palestinians is on the defensive over newly reported details of an interim peace accord offered months ago by outgoing Prime Minister Ehud Olmert. Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni, the standard bearer of Olmert's centrist Kadima Party, was already trailing in the polls before the disclosures last week prompted the hawkish front-runner to accuse her of agreeing to "surrender" parts of Jerusalem for an independent Palestinian state.
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas met informally in Jordan yesterday, and aides said the leaders would hold official talks in coming weeks. The two leaders attended a breakfast held by Jordan's King Abdullah II as part of a two-day gathering of Nobel laureates and business and political leaders near the ruins of the ancient town of Petra. Olmert and Abbas shook hands and smiled for the cameras but did not delve into substantive matters, officials said.
NEWS
By JOEL GREENBERG and JOEL GREENBERG,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 28, 2006
JERUSALEM -- The centrist Kadima Party of acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert signed a coalition deal yesterday with the left-leaning Labor Party, forming the core of a new Israeli government expected to pursue a plan for the removal of Israeli settlements from large areas of the West Bank. Kadima won Israel's election March 28 but must build a coalition with other parties to gain a majority in the 120-member legislature. A coalition agreement was signed Wednesday with the Pensioners Party, and two religious parties, Shas and United Torah Judaism, are expected to join.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 30, 2006
ELON MOREH, West Bank -- On a hilltop overlooking the Palestinian city of Nablus, residents of this Jewish settlement wept and prayed yesterday at a memorial service for four residents killed by Palestinians in 2002, and in a sense, over Israeli voters' decision this week to tell Jewish settlers to abandon their homes. On Tuesday, Israelis voted into office the Kadima party, whose chief promise is to evacuate settlements such as this one. At yesterday's memorial service, the residents of Elon Moreh promised to honor the dead by never leaving.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Ehud Olmert's centrist Kadima party won the largest number of seats yesterday in Israel's parliamentary elections, ensuring that Olmert will become prime minister and be able to pursue his plan to give up some Jewish settlements in the West Bank and establish the country's permanent borders. Kadima's victory was muted by the party's winning fewer seats than polls had projected. But it broke the monopoly on leadership held since the country's founding by the center-left Labor Party and its predecessors, and by the right-wing Likud, the party Olmert left to join Kadima.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2006
JERUSALEM -- On the eve of Israel's parliamentary elections, the large lead held by Kadima, the centrist party founded by Ariel Sharon before he was felled by a stroke, appeared to be eroding, final public opinion surveys indicated. Kadima was still expected to win the biggest share of seats in the 120-member Knesset in today's vote, but a smaller-than-hoped-for margin of victory would complicate efforts to assemble a stable governing coalition. The vote pits Kadima, led by acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, against the left-leaning Labor Party and the conservative Likud, led respectively by Amir Peretz and former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
NEWS
By John Murphy, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
Ariel Sharon, the daring Israeli general who as a field commander and prime minister became one of the most influential and controversial leaders in the Middle East, died Saturday. He was 85. Sharon, who had been incapacitated since suffering a severe stroke in 2006, was moved in 2010 to his ranch in the Negev desert at the request of his family. In September he underwent abdominal surgery, but his condition worsened this month as his organs deteriorated. Sharon's death at a hospital near Tel Aviv was announced by his son Gilad.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2006
JERUSALEM -- On the eve of Israel's parliamentary elections, the large lead held by Kadima, the centrist party founded by Ariel Sharon before he was felled by a stroke, appeared to be eroding, final public opinion surveys indicated. Kadima was still expected to win the biggest share of seats in the 120-member Knesset in today's vote, but a smaller-than-hoped-for margin of victory would complicate efforts to assemble a stable governing coalition. The vote pits Kadima, led by acting Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, against the left-leaning Labor Party and the conservative Likud, led respectively by Amir Peretz and former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 10, 2006
JERUSALEM --Israel's acting prime minister, Ehud Olmert, said that if his Kadima Party wins national elections this month, he would seek to set Israel's permanent borders by 2010 and that the boundary would run along or close to Israel's separation barrier in the West Bank. Olmert also said he planned to develop Israel's largest settlement, Maale Adumim, which would eventually be linked with nearby East Jerusalem - a move the Palestinians vehemently oppose. The United States has also objected to this plan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 2006
JERUSALEM --Ehud Olmert, the acting prime minister and the leader of the new Kadima Party, has been renamed Smolmert in an effort to label him dovish and left-wing (smol is Hebrew for left). Benjamin Netanyahu of Likud, the former prime minister known as Bibi, is pictured as shifty-eyed, bloated, anxious and untrustworthy, giving himself pep talks ("I can do this; I'm the Bibi"). Amir Peretz, the Moroccan-born leader of the Labor Party, is portrayed as an inexperienced socialist simpleton, with Israel's Russian-born voters reminded of how much he looks like Stalin.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.