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NEWS
August 19, 2005
On August 17, 2005, FLORENCEMARGARET KACZYNSKI (nee Kmieciak), beloved wife of the late Stephen P. Kaczynski; devoted mother of Florence Dean, Rosemarie Mc Curdy and the late Joann Stallings; devoted sister of Phil Kmieciak; loving grandmother of Deborah, Stephanie, John, Daniel, Monica, Katherine, Danielle, Patty and children; dear great-grandmother of Nicholas and Brent. Friends may call at the CVACH/ROSEDALE FUNERAL HOME, 1211 Chesaco Avenue on Friday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral service, Saturday, 10 A.M. from the funeral home.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 10, 2005
BERLIN -- A former labor activist from the Solidarity trade union appeared to have come in first in Poland's hotly contested presidential election yesterday, but exit polls indicated that he would not win the majority he would need to avoid a runoff in two weeks. Donald Tusk, 48, an unabashed free-market supporter who advocated a 15 percent flat tax for Poland, received 38.4 percent of the vote, according to exit polls last night commissioned by Polish state television. The official vote tally was not expected until today.
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FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | September 16, 1996
WE GOT WHAT we came to see. David Kaczynski told us last night on "60 Minutes" what it was like to turn in his brother Ted, the alleged Unabomber, to the FBI.It was hell.It remains hell.He's a man in anguish. And hardly anything makes better television than real-life, from-the-gut anguish.Kaczynski spoke freely of that anguish to Mike Wallace and Leslie Stahl. The program teased with it in the opening. Kaczynski was tortured, he said, by the thought of "how it must feel to him, to be turned in by his own brother."
NEWS
August 19, 2005
On August 17, 2005, FLORENCEMARGARET KACZYNSKI (nee Kmieciak), beloved wife of the late Stephen P. Kaczynski; devoted mother of Florence Dean, Rosemarie Mc Curdy and the late Joann Stallings; devoted sister of Phil Kmieciak; loving grandmother of Deborah, Stephanie, John, Daniel, Monica, Katherine, Danielle, Patty and children; dear great-grandmother of Nicholas and Brent. Friends may call at the CVACH/ROSEDALE FUNERAL HOME, 1211 Chesaco Avenue on Friday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral service, Saturday, 10 A.M. from the funeral home.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Federal law enforcement officials said yesterday that agents searching Theodore J. Kaczynski's Montana cabin had found the original typewritten manuscript of the Unabomber's 35,000-word manifesto, a powerful piece of evidence that has convinced the authorities that they have the long-sought serial terrorist.Elated officials said the recent discovery of the manuscript in the cabin capped a week-long search of the remote mountain cabin, in Lincoln, Mont., that has so far yielded a trove of physical evidence that prosecutors hope will provide them with an incontrovertible case against Mr. Kaczynski.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 1996
TERLINGUA, Texas -- Barely two years ago, Theodore J. Kaczynski, the man suspected of being the Unabomber, raged against government officials, portraying them as "either stupid and incompetent, or liars who twist the law to commit any injustice."At the same time, Mr. Kaczynski, writing to a Mexican farmhand with whom he had maintained a seven-year correspondence, shared his longing for a different life than the solitary existence he led in a remote cabin in the mountains of Montana.Replying to a complaint from the farmhand, Juan Sanchez Arreola, about Mr. Sanchez's difficulty in resolving a pension dispute with the Mexican government, Mr. Kaczynski wrote in May 1994: "Although what the officials are doing is a great injustice, consider that your fortune is not all bad, because you have a wife and three children and all are healthy."
BUSINESS
By Richard Burnett of The Sentinel Staff | September 14, 1993
HELENA, Mont. -- Federal agents are investigating whether Unabomber suspect Theodore J. Kaczynski ever sought or received psychiatric treatment for depression, a source familiar with the investigation said yesterday.Based on the discovery of a bottle of an anti-depressant medication in his cabin, the FBI is attempting to locate any doctors who might have prescribed drugs or provided therapy to the former math professor, the source said.The Unabomber, in the rambling 35,000-word manifesto that was published last year, frequently cited depression as a symptom of society's illness in the technological age. "Instead of removing the conditions that make people depressed, modern society gives them anti-depressant drugs," the serial bomber complained.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 9, 1997
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- To the government, Unabomber suspect Theodore J. Kaczynski is a meticulous terrorist who spent years refining his deadly bombs and keeping "lab notes" ** on his work.Defense lawyers, however, will counter with a different portrait of the man whose murder trial begins with jury selection here Wednesday: They will describe a paranoid schizophrenic, a man whose illness leaves him incapable of intending, by legal definition, to harm anyone.It is, trial analysts say, a risky defense strategy -- but perhaps the best available in a case that has the government promising to fill a federal courtroom with evidence linking Kaczynski to the crimes of the Unabomber.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 26, 1996
NEW YORK -- Breaking his public silence, David Kaczynski described in an interview how he had reluctantly come to the "horrible" realization that his older brother, Theodore, could be the Unabomber. He recounted his anguished decision to turn him in to prevent more lives from being lost, and he pleaded that his brother, if convicted in the fatal bomb attacks, be spared the death penalty.Over six hours on Tuesday, David Kaczynski recalled how, at first, he had resisted his wife's suggestions last summer that Ted might be the Unabomber.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 4, 1998
When U.S. District Judge Garland E. Burrell Jr. had questions for jury candidates in the trial of Unabomber suspect Theodore Kaczynski, he would sometimes step down from the grand elevation of the bench to talk to potential jurors at their eye level.It is a practice rarely seen in the staid federal court. But it is not unusual in Burrell's Sacramento, Calif., courtroom, where the judge presides in a gentlemanly manner meant to preserve decorum while putting people at ease."He wants the jurors to be comfortable and doesn't want them to feel he's above them," says Sacramento lawyer Donald Heller.
NEWS
December 22, 2004
On December 18, 2004, REGINA K. BECKER (nee Kaczynski), beloved wife of William E. Becker, loving mother of Carol A. Currotto, adored grandmother of Benjamin B. Currotto and R. Peter Currotto. Also survived by step-children Darcy L. Lynch and William O. Becker, and brother John Kaczynski. Family and friends may gather at the The Conference Center at Sheppard Pratt, 6501 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21285 on Thursday, December 23 at 10 A.M., followed by a memorial service at 11 A.M. Those desiring may make contributions to Anatomy Gifts Registry, 7526 Connelley Dr., Ste. E, Hanover, MD 21076, or simply send a kind thought and a prayer.
NEWS
December 2, 2003
On November 29, 2003, FRANK J., SR., beloved husband of Louella V. ( nee Lazzaro) and devoted father of Mary Lou Bell and her husband Harry, Frank J. Jr., and Robert D. Heatterich and his wife Louise and Lisa A. Kaczynski; cherished grandfather of Kelly C. Veloso and Brendan J. Kaczynski; loving brother of Lillian Dehaven, Rose Byer and Margaret Trugenberger. Also survived by other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the family owned HARTLEY MILLER-STELLA FUNERAL HOME CHTD., 7527 Harford Rd., on Monday and Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 PM where services will be held on Wednesday at 11 AM. Interment in Parkwood Cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff | March 9, 2003
Harvard and the Unabomber: The Education of an American Terrorist, by Alston Chase. W.W. Norton. 352 pages. $26.95. Take America's fascination with sociopathic murder and pair it with the intellectual mystique surrounding Harvard, and you should have a great tale to be told. And Alston Chase, a Harvard graduate and a former civilization fleer to Montana himself, has told it -- but with a twist that carries his new book over the edge of reasonability and readability. Chase, often through wildly subjective interpretations of how the literature on Ted Kaczynski's cabin bookshelf influenced the Unabomber's antisocial mind and deeds, argues that Harvard subtly planted the seeds of discontent.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2000
When FBI agents raided Theodore J. Kaczynski's remote Montana cabin in April 1996, they found thousands of handwritten pages that eventually unmasked the reclusive, Harvard-trained mathematician as the Unabomber. But there was a problem: Hundreds of the documents were written in Spanish or in a meticulous numerical code that even when broken translated to Spanish instead of English. In time, the cryptic journals formed the cornerstone of the government's case against Kaczynski. But at the Montana cabin that spring, where agents also had found an assembled bomb, investigators feared the pages contained plans for targeting victims beyond the three people already killed and 23 injured.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Pekkanen and Sarah Pekkanen,Sun Staff | August 29, 1999
Four years ago, a man known only as the Unabomber demanded that two major newspapers print his 35,000-word manifesto -- or he'd strike again. After much agonizing over ethics and journalistic responsibility, both papers acquiesced.Today, Ted Kaczynski is locked away for life. But he hasn't stopped writing.Next month, another publication -- an obscure student-run magazine at the State University of New York at Binghamton -- will serve up Kaczynski's latest creative ramblings, penned in his Colorado prison cell.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 1, 1999
From prison, Theodore J. Kaczynski, who pleaded guilty to the Unabomber killings, has a message for his brother, who turned him in to the government.In a book to be published this spring, Kaczynski says he could forgive what he calls his brother's treason. But forgiveness will come only if the brother, David Kaczynski, leaves his wife and joins with groups fighting modern society or, as Theodore himself did, lives in rural isolation."In this way he would not only earn my personal forgiveness; what is more important, he would be cleansed and redeemed of his treason against the values that he once held in common with me and many other people," Kaczynski writes.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 22, 1996
HELENA, MONT. -- Unabomber suspect Theodore J. Kaczynski yesterday was ordered moved to Sacramento, Calif., to face charges in four bombing attacks that killed a lobbyist and a computer store owner and maimed two university professors.Federal District Judge Charles C. Lovell issued the order, and the U.S. Marshal Service said later that Kaczynski will arrive in Sacramento Monday night.He is scheduled to be arraigned Tuesday before Magistrate Judge Peter A. Nowinski, the U.S. attorney's office in Sacramento said.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 21, 1996
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- In a handwritten journal found in his Montana cabin, Unabomber suspect Theodore J. Kaczynski tied himself directly to a deadly, coast-to-coast trail of 16 bombings and expressed "his desire to kill," a federal prosecutor said yesterday.In a number of instances, the daily journal entries simply note " 'I mailed that bomb.' 'I sent that bomb,' " Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Cleary said in a federal court hearing on the status of the case.He described a stack of documents seized at the tiny cabin as "the backbone of the government's case" against Kaczynski, a one-time math professor at the University of California, Berkeley.
NEWS
May 8, 1998
THE TERROR committed by an obsessed murderer from May 1978 to April 1996 is put behind the nation. The man called Unabomber, a shambles of a 55-year-old reclusive mathematician, will not kill, maim or frighten again. He has begun serving his sentence of four lifetimes plus 30 years in Florence, Colo., in the highest security federal prison. It is over.Theodore J. Kaczynski has much in common with his prison mate, Timothy J. McVeigh, and with self-righteous terrorists from the IRA to Hamas.
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