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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
Maryland homebuyers will gain some warning of environmental hazards like the methane gas that forced evacuation of several new homes in Elkridge last year and sparked a $75 million lawsuit, say advocates of a bill enacted by the General Assembly April 7. The legislation survived opposition from builders, who helped kill several other consumer-oriented measures this year -- such as builder registration -- and who say the new law will require useless...
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NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
Baltimore County's roads stand to receive $351 million in state- and federally funded improvements during the next six years -- but local officials are asking for more.With a $200 million pot of transportation money up for grabs, Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger renewed his push yesterday for the state to contribute $50 million toward the construction of a long-planned extension of Route 43 in White Marsh."This project opens up almost 700 acres for new commercial development," Ruppersberger told state transportation secretary John D. Porcari and his top aides, in town for their annual meeting on local road and transit projects.
NEWS
October 26, 1994
To cut into conservative strength in Maryland's Eighth Legislative District, Democratic redistricters acted two years ago drop some of the Eighth's more Republican precincts in favor of city neighborhoods and other areas that would be inclined to vote for Democrats. The lone Democratic incumbent from the district, Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell, will nonetheless have a hard time winning re-election. For one thing, the district remains largely conservative. For another, his GOP opponent, Del. John J. Bishop Jr., is a moderate who can appeal to voters from both parties.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2002
The Baltimore County Council's commission on redistricting has announced its plan for getting what critics said was lacking the last time lines were redrawn: public input. The six members, meeting for the first time Friday, said they are reluctant to schedule meetings with other groups that have drafted reform proposals or with people who complained that the council acted in secret when it drew new lines last summer. Such meetings, they said, could keep the commission from meeting its May 1 deadline.
NEWS
March 1, 1994
In 1929, Arab rioters killed some 60 Jews in Hebron. The event is etched in Israeli consciousness. Its remembrance forms part of Israeli nationalism. After partition in 1948, Hebron was controlled by Jordan, the ethnic cleansing complete. To roll it back, ardent Zionists founded Kiryat Arba and other settlements near Hebron and the reputed Cave of Abraham, after Israel occupied the West Bank in 1967.The slaughter of Arab Muslim worshipers at the Cave of Abraham by the American-Israeli Baruch Goldstein last Friday was a comparable atrocity.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
A former math teacher. A firefighter. A lawyer. A small-business woman. A full-time doctoral student. A congressional aide. When the legislative session started in January, the six delegates from different cliques in Maryland's clubby General Assembly had this in common: None would have called himself or herself a supporter of Gov. Martin O'Malley's bill to legalize same-sex marriage. Yet all cast votes Friday in favor of the measure, providing the margin needed to pass the bill, 72-67, in the House of Delegates, which had rejected a similar measure 11 months ago. Some never let on that they were wavering.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | September 9, 1995
JERUSALEM -- A radical Jewish group claimed that its members shot and killed a Palestinian yesterday, suggesting re-emergence of the violent underground movement that has long worried Israeli authorities.Five men dressed as Israeli soldiers broke into several Palestinian homes near Hebron, rousted the residents, tied up an elderly man and shot to death his son about 1 a.m., according to police reports.The army said none of its soldiers was in the area.Later yesterday, a group called Eyal, which means "ram" in Hebrew and is an acronym for "Fighting Jewish Organization," claimed responsibility for the killing.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
The Baltimore County Council could see big changes in the coming elections as most members face stiff primary challenges and a council veteran is stepping down. Campaign signs are popping up all over the county and literature is arriving in mailboxes as candidates approach the June 24 primary. Four of the council's seven members - Democrats Cathy Bevins, Ken Oliver and Vicki Almond and Republican Todd Huff - are in spirited primary battles. And Dundalk's John Olszewski Sr. is retiring from the council, triggering a scramble among five Democrats for the party nomination.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 27, 1997
JERUSALEM -- After serving 15 1/2 years of a life sentence for a terrorist attack on a Muslim holy shrine, Baltimore-born Alan H. Goodman was released from an Israeli prison last night under an agreement that enabled the convicted killer to return to Maryland, prison officials said.Goodman, 53, was scheduled to leave Israel on a flight bound for the United States and a reunion with his mother, Fannie, in Baltimore.Goodman was convicted on murder and assault with intent to murder charges in an April 11, 1982, shooting in the courtyard of the Al Aqsa mosque on the sacred Temple Mount in Jerusalem, the third-holiest shrine in Islam.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2004
A House committee voted 16-6 yesterday to approve a bill that would create a state registry to allow unmarried roommates to make medical decisions for one another. Members of the Health and Government Operations Committee fought amendments to the Medical Decision Making Act of 2004 that would have widened its target beyond the two groups that want the protection because they are unable or unwilling to marry: gay couples and seniors age 62 and older. If the bill becomes law, eligible couples would be able to register their relationship with a state health agency in order to ease post-death and medical care decision-making.
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