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NEWS
April 20, 2012
Afghan President Hamid Karzai made a very weak excuse recently when, in response to recent insurgent strikes in Kabul, he stated that the "attack showed a 'failure' by Afghanistan intelligence and NATO" ("Attacks in Kabul show vulnerability," April 17). In my opinion, this statement should be considered an extreme embarrassment to Mr. Karzai. As anyone else who is as keenly interested as I am should be well aware, this raging conflict between the Taliban rebels and the Afghanistan government and their military forces is, and has been for some time, in desperate need of much stronger support from the U.S and NATO troops in order to quell a challenging problem.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Hundreds of mourners bid farewell Thursday to Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene, the highest-ranking Army officer killed in combat since the Vietnam War. General Greene, a former leader at Aberdeen Proving Ground who was shot to death last week in Afghanistan, was laid to rest during a somber ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. His wife, retired Col. Sue Myers, and their son, Lt. Matthew J. Greene, saluted his flag-draped coffin as a howitzer fired a 13-gun salute. The burial followed a private memorial service attended by 800 mourners, many in uniform, at Joint Base Myers-Henderson Hall.
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NEWS
June 19, 2013
No sooner had the U.S. announced that it would reopen long-stalled peace negotiations with the Taliban this week than Afghan President Hamid Karzai rushed to throw cold water on the idea. Mind you, the mercurial Mr. Karzai had been on board with the American plan as recently as the day before. But he suddenly changed his mind after the Taliban opened a political office in Qatar, where the talks are scheduled to take place. It seems that the office, with the group's banner flying outside, made it look too much as if the Taliban were a legitimate government in exile rather than a lawless insurgency.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene had served more than three decades in uniform without a combat tour when he got the assignment last year: He was wanted in Kabul to help train the Afghan National Security Forces. Jim Costigan, a former co-worker, golf partner and friend, had asked Greene the question before. Now he asked again. "I said, 'Harry, no one's going to be critical of you if you retire,' " Costigan, a retired Army colonel, remembered Wednesday. "'Just retire, now.' "And he said to me, 'I sent soldiers, officers, NCOs, men and women to similar assignments over the last 10 years.
NEWS
February 5, 1993
The rain of rockets and artillery on Kabul makes the Afghan capital another Sarajevo. Hundreds are dead. Thousands are wounded. The hospitals cannot cope. The victims' crime is to dTC live in Kabul. The perpetrators are the militia Hezb-I-Islami whose leader, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, believes that interim President Burhanuddin Rabbani is insufficiently Islamic and should step down, preferably in favor of Mr. Hekmatyar. The weapons are American.Perhaps Mr. Rabbani, a comparatively gentle cleric who favors an Islamic Afghanistan, should step down.
NEWS
May 3, 1992
The installation of a broad-based interim government in Kabul marks the end of the last hot war fought by Third World surrogates of superpowers in the Cold War. Whatever fighting continues is among the victors.Sibghatullah Mojaddidi, who took over as president of the interim council for two months, led the least formidable of the seven exiled political parties in Pakistan. He was chosen as a compromise by stronger rivals. Like most Islamic intellectuals of Afghanistan, he studied in Egypt.
NEWS
June 10, 2002
THE GOOD NEWS about politics in Afghanistan is that it is now actually possible for things to get worse. This week, 1,501 delegates to the loya jirga - or grand council - will get together in Kabul to form a government to run the country for the next two years. Beset by warlordism, drought, tardy aid donors, continued fighting against roving Taliban units, and the lack of an army to call its own, Afghanistan has nonetheless gotten this far and just might keep going. Hamid Karzai, the interim leader, wields no real power outside his capital, but has been able to persuade various regional strongmen that it is in their interests to go along with his program.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Maj. Gen. Harold J. Greene had served more than three decades in uniform without a combat tour when he got the assignment last year: He was wanted in Kabul to help train the Afghan National Security Forces. Jim Costigan, a former co-worker, golf partner and friend, had asked Greene the question before. Now he asked again. "I said, 'Harry, no one's going to be critical of you if you retire,' " Costigan, a retired Army colonel, remembered Wednesday. "'Just retire, now.' "And he said to me, 'I sent soldiers, officers, NCOs, men and women to similar assignments over the last 10 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | February 8, 2004
The Swallows of Kabul, by Yasmina Khadra. Doubleday. 208 pages. $18.95. Most people of Kabul never got used to the idea of the Taliban running their lives. Even after enduring two decades of war, they weren't ready for the brand of peace offered by ultra-conservative Islamic scolds from the sticks. Taliban severity reduced women to caged and silenced birds, subject to beatings for the slightest indiscretion. Men also lived in fear of punishment and execution, lest their piety be called into question.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 2006
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A suicide car bomber struck near a U.S. military base yesterday, killing at least two people, and a U.S. soldier was reported killed in fighting with insurgents in southern Afghanistan. A car accident apparently prevented the suicide bomber from reaching his intended target, believed to be a store frequented by foreigners on the outskirts of Kabul, said Yousuf Stanizai, a spokesman for the Afghan interior ministry. The target also might have been U.S. or NATO forces that have bases on the same road, Stanizai said.
NEWS
January 30, 2014
Afghan President Hamid Karzai's rebuke of U.S. and NATO forces as the principal cause of civilian casualties in his country understandably outraged American officials, with some in Congress threatening to retaliate by making even deeper cuts in military and other aid to that impoverished nation. Nevertheless, the U.S. has important long-term interests in preventing Afghanistan from sliding back into chaos that transcend the indignity of the daily stream of slights and insults issuing from Mr. Karzai's office.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
No sooner had the U.S. announced that it would reopen long-stalled peace negotiations with the Taliban this week than Afghan President Hamid Karzai rushed to throw cold water on the idea. Mind you, the mercurial Mr. Karzai had been on board with the American plan as recently as the day before. But he suddenly changed his mind after the Taliban opened a political office in Qatar, where the talks are scheduled to take place. It seems that the office, with the group's banner flying outside, made it look too much as if the Taliban were a legitimate government in exile rather than a lawless insurgency.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Maryland National Guard Sgt. Darren Lebowitz is leaving soon for Afghanistan as many U.S. troops return home. Lebowitz, who has served three tours in Iraq, volunteered for the mission. "I'm a glutton for punishment," he said as he trained Tuesday at this National Guard installation in Central Pennsylvania. As the United States and its coalition partners draw forces out of Afghanistan, more than 250 Maryland guardsmen are heading in. Members of three military police units are preparing for deployments to Kandahar and Bagram, where they will work with Afghan forces, provide security and take on any other assignments that might arise.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
Afghan President Hamid Karzai made a very weak excuse recently when, in response to recent insurgent strikes in Kabul, he stated that the "attack showed a 'failure' by Afghanistan intelligence and NATO" ("Attacks in Kabul show vulnerability," April 17). In my opinion, this statement should be considered an extreme embarrassment to Mr. Karzai. As anyone else who is as keenly interested as I am should be well aware, this raging conflict between the Taliban rebels and the Afghanistan government and their military forces is, and has been for some time, in desperate need of much stronger support from the U.S and NATO troops in order to quell a challenging problem.
NEWS
June 30, 2011
The Obama administration may finally be on the right track in its strategy for combating terrorism, as its new strategic doctrine has sworn off counter-insurgency in favor of a more targeted approach — one that we see already in effect as unmanned drones carry out strikes in Yemen, Somalia and elsewhere. The new approach is contained in a 19-page document, the "National Strategy for Counterterrorism," which was outlined Wednesday by John O. Brennan, President Obama's counterterrorism chief.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2010
When Donald Albert and Stephen Decato came to Baltimore from rural New Hampshire to sample the urban noise environment for the Army, they had two worries. How dangerous would it be to work on streets they'd seen portrayed in bloody HBO crime dramas? And what kind of suspicion might they arouse as they deployed their black attache cases and weird electronic equipment in a city that was reliving a nightmare during the trial of Washington-area sniper John Allen Mohammad?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 17, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A suicide bomber driving a taxi set off his explosives near a convoy of American civilian contractors and accompanying soldiers yesterday morning, killing himself and four bystanders, the Kabul police said. One of his intended targets was wounded. Within hours, U.S. soldiers fired into a crowd of Afghans near the scene of the blast, accidentally killing one man and wounding another, according to a U.S. military spokesman, Lt. Col. David A. Accetta. "It was an unfortunate incident, and we are investigating the cause of the accidental discharge of a weapon," he said.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 13, 2002
KABUL, Afghanistan - Helmeted riot police fired live ammunition to disperse student demonstrators yesterday during a second day of clashes over conditions at Kabul University, protests that point to some of the wider frustrations building within Afghan society a year after the collapse of the Taliban. No casualties were confirmed in the conflict yesterday, but as many as four students had been killed by police gunfire Monday night. The students attempted to take to the streets yesterday to protest the deadly shootings by police trying to quell an apparently impromptu demonstration Monday night.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Tribune Newspapers | August 16, 2009
KABUL, Afghanistan - - The thunderous explosion Saturday that targeted Western military headquarters in the heart of Kabul carried an ominous message aimed at ordinary Afghans just five days before national elections: Vote at your peril. The audacious suicide car bombing, which killed at least seven people and injured nearly 100, appeared designed to signal that insurgents can strike at will even in the capital's most tightly guarded districts. "The intent here is clear," said Aziz Rafiee, executive director of the Afghan Civil Society Forum.
NEWS
By Laura King and Laura King,Tribune Newspapers | July 10, 2009
KABUL, Afghanistan - -A powerful truck bomb on Thursday killed at least 25 people, more than half of them children, in an eastern province near Kabul. Authorities speculated that the explosives-laden vehicle was intended for an attack in the capital. Three American soldiers were killed by roadside bombs, the U.S. military said, two in southern Afghanistan and one in the east. The incidents followed a pattern of escalating violence in widely scattered areas of Afghanistan. The truck blast took place in Lowgar province.
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