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By Nicole Sakin, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
Sammi Nelson-Saunders stood in a crowd of blue and purple shirts, dirt on her hands and a smile on her face. Behind her, music was blasting and flowers were being planted as more than 300 volunteers built a new playground for students at KIPP Baltimore. The rising third-grader at KIPP, a Knowledge is Power Program charter school in Northwest Baltimore, had been used to playing on an empty field adjacent to the school. "I was very excited because we never had a playground, and now we have a playground to play on," Nelson-Saunders said.
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FEATURES
By Nicole Sakin, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
Sammi Nelson-Saunders stood in a crowd of blue and purple shirts, dirt on her hands and a smile on her face. Behind her, music was blasting and flowers were being planted as more than 300 volunteers built a new playground for students at KIPP Baltimore. The rising third-grader at KIPP, a Knowledge is Power Program charter school in Northwest Baltimore, had been used to playing on an empty field adjacent to the school. "I was very excited because we never had a playground, and now we have a playground to play on," Nelson-Saunders said.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
The playground at the Salvation Army was in sad shape: 50 years old, falling apart and infested with bees. It was so shabby that kids were no longer allowed to play in it. That changed this month with a daylong construction blitz that ended with a new playground featuring swings, slides, a rock wall and a zip line. "When they went to school this morning, there wasn't a playground. When they get out, they will have a playground," said Katrina Hill, a project manager with KaBOOM!
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
The playground at the Salvation Army was in sad shape: 50 years old, falling apart and infested with bees. It was so shabby that kids were no longer allowed to play in it. That changed this month with a daylong construction blitz that ended with a new playground featuring swings, slides, a rock wall and a zip line. "When they went to school this morning, there wasn't a playground. When they get out, they will have a playground," said Katrina Hill, a project manager with KaBOOM!
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2001
Pimlico Elementary School once had nothing but an empty lot for kids to play in. Swing sets and monkey bars came later -- only to be done in by enthusiastic use and vandals. Yesterday, kids in the Northwest Baltimore neighborhood got a playground to covet. More than 200 volunteers swept into the school's back yard and erected shiny red, yellow and blue equipment -- slides, ladders, even a steering wheel for flights of fancy. They shoveled a mountain of mulch. They built benches, planters and picnic tables.
NEWS
By Julie Baughman, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Reservoir Hill's Whitelock Street, once known for its thriving businesses, is known more today for violence and illegal drugs. On Thursday, the Baltimore Ravens and a nonprofit organization built a new playground and butterfly garden at German Park in an effort to aid the long-troubled neighborhood. The old playground at German Park was built in 1979. But the wooden structure, built over concrete, proved dangerous and has fallen into disuse in recent years. The new playground is built from metal and plastic over a foundation of mulch and rubber.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
A Navy band sounded colors, the U.S. flag was raised, and three 300-foot-tall radio towers came crashing down yesterday at the Naval Academy in Annapolis in a matter of seconds.The towers -- a landmark for sailors and tourists -- fell victim to the changing world of telecommunications, as satellites and other wireless communication eclipsed their usefulness."They raised the flag, and within a minute -- kaboom, kaboom, kaboom -- down came the towers," said John Schorpp, the only employee at the Navy radio station since it closed in 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | July 1, 1999
MeadeFest '99Enjoy carnival rides and games, magic and puppet shows, roaming clowns, music ranging from rock to jazz to patriotic, a military car show, the Marine Silent Drill Team and plenty of food this weekend at the annual MeadeFest on McGlachlin Field, Mapes Road and Llewellyn Avenue, Fort Meade. A 5-kilometer fun-run/walk is scheduled for 8 a.m. Saturday, and the three-day festival closes with fireworks Sunday evening. Hours are noon to 11 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and noon to midnight Sunday.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The nation's capital is a city of lights. And pops. And flares. And dive-bomb whistles.This is one of the few major East Coast cities where a wide range of fireworks is sold legally. Marylanders, whose state imposes stricter curbs, cross the border to buy Fourth of July goodies, while visitors from Hong Kong and other far-flung cities marvel at the array of items outlawed back home."I had a customer from Australia -- she was looking around, and she said everything's illegal over there," said Wanda Lewis, who sells Pyromaniac gift packages and Kaboom fireworks from a flag-draped stand on New York Avenue here.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | May 2, 2008
Over the next three days, a few hundred thousand Americans are expected to show up at theaters for the premiere weekend of Iron Man, based on the Marvel Comics character. If only the country's 3,000 comics stores could entice even a small percentage of them into their shops. "There might be a few people who come in for their kids, but it won't be as many people as you'd think, as far as the person who's not into comics," says John "Bumper" Moyer, owner of Glen Burnie's Twilite Zone Comics.
NEWS
By Julie Baughman, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Reservoir Hill's Whitelock Street, once known for its thriving businesses, is known more today for violence and illegal drugs. On Thursday, the Baltimore Ravens and a nonprofit organization built a new playground and butterfly garden at German Park in an effort to aid the long-troubled neighborhood. The old playground at German Park was built in 1979. But the wooden structure, built over concrete, proved dangerous and has fallen into disuse in recent years. The new playground is built from metal and plastic over a foundation of mulch and rubber.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore | February 21, 2011
Digital entertainment has shaken the retail industry, shuttering your local brick-and-mortar record store, bookseller and video rental outlets. Could the neighborhood comic book shop be next? Diamond Comic Distributors Inc. hopes not. The Timonium company is the country's largest distributor of comics to about 2,700 small retailers. It has been fighting the same forces — online sales, changing consumer habits and even digital piracy — that are pushing other retailers to the brink.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | May 2, 2008
Over the next three days, a few hundred thousand Americans are expected to show up at theaters for the premiere weekend of Iron Man, based on the Marvel Comics character. If only the country's 3,000 comics stores could entice even a small percentage of them into their shops. "There might be a few people who come in for their kids, but it won't be as many people as you'd think, as far as the person who's not into comics," says John "Bumper" Moyer, owner of Glen Burnie's Twilite Zone Comics.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2001
Pimlico Elementary School once had nothing but an empty lot for kids to play in. Swing sets and monkey bars came later -- only to be done in by enthusiastic use and vandals. Yesterday, kids in the Northwest Baltimore neighborhood got a playground to covet. More than 200 volunteers swept into the school's back yard and erected shiny red, yellow and blue equipment -- slides, ladders, even a steering wheel for flights of fancy. They shoveled a mountain of mulch. They built benches, planters and picnic tables.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1999
A Navy band sounded colors, the U.S. flag was raised, and three 300-foot-tall radio towers came crashing down yesterday at the Naval Academy in Annapolis in a matter of seconds.The towers -- a landmark for sailors and tourists -- fell victim to the changing world of telecommunications, as satellites and other wireless communication eclipsed their usefulness."They raised the flag, and within a minute -- kaboom, kaboom, kaboom -- down came the towers," said John Schorpp, the only employee at the Navy radio station since it closed in 1996.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | July 1, 1999
MeadeFest '99Enjoy carnival rides and games, magic and puppet shows, roaming clowns, music ranging from rock to jazz to patriotic, a military car show, the Marine Silent Drill Team and plenty of food this weekend at the annual MeadeFest on McGlachlin Field, Mapes Road and Llewellyn Avenue, Fort Meade. A 5-kilometer fun-run/walk is scheduled for 8 a.m. Saturday, and the three-day festival closes with fireworks Sunday evening. Hours are noon to 11 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and noon to midnight Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1998
There are magicians among us. But instead of rabbits or flowers, they conjure jet fighters, demons, pirates and the ghosts of Civil War generals.Sid Meier is first among them. The 44-year-old Hunt Valley computer programmer is a legend in the world of computer gamers, practicing his craft in a snake pit of electrical cords, humming computers, crumb-filled Pop Tarts boxes, and half-empty soda cans.Many gamers think his masterpiece, Sid Meier's Civilization, is the greatest simulation of all time.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore | February 21, 2011
Digital entertainment has shaken the retail industry, shuttering your local brick-and-mortar record store, bookseller and video rental outlets. Could the neighborhood comic book shop be next? Diamond Comic Distributors Inc. hopes not. The Timonium company is the country's largest distributor of comics to about 2,700 small retailers. It has been fighting the same forces — online sales, changing consumer habits and even digital piracy — that are pushing other retailers to the brink.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1998
There are magicians among us. But instead of rabbits or flowers, they conjure jet fighters, demons, pirates and the ghosts of Civil War generals.Sid Meier is first among them. The 44-year-old Hunt Valley computer programmer is a legend in the world of computer gamers, practicing his craft in a snake pit of electrical cords, humming computers, crumb-filled Pop Tarts boxes, and half-empty soda cans.Many gamers think his masterpiece, Sid Meier's Civilization, is the greatest simulation of all time.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN : SUN STAFF | March 14, 1998
THE END IS FAR! THE END IS FAR!Nothing really dramatic ever happens anymore. The universe is getting so boring. One day, an asteroid the size of a Rocky mountain is aiming for us in 2028. The next day, that prediction is retracted, and the astronomers who made it "could not be reached for comment."Another party ruined. But for a brief moment in time, chances were microscopic, infinitesimal, molecular and even small that Asteroid 1997 XF11 ("Biff," for short) would thump us to extinction. Despite the odds, Wednesday's thrilling astronomical bulletin rocked our puny imaginations.
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