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NEWS
May 8, 1997
WITH KINSHASA preparing to welcome Laurent Kabila and his Alliance of Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Congo, Mobutu Sese Seku's 32-year misrule of Zaire is virtually ended, and the trauma of rebellion nearly so.President Mobutu flew mercifully to Gabon yesterday. Although promising to return, he will dismay all Zairians if he fails to fly on to his ill-gotten villa in the south of France, there to see out his remaining days.A Western world that created, coddled and ignored the Mobutu tyranny has suddenly awakened to imperfections of the obscure liberator.
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NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | March 25, 2007
An international relief agency housed at the Brethren Service Center in New Windsor is implementing a $40 million federal grant to restore public health in war-ravaged zones of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. IMA World Health, formerly known as Interchurch Medical Assistance Inc., has been active in African relief efforts since its founding in 1960. The nonprofit organization works around the globe through a worldwide network of a dozen church agencies. "It's a hidden jewel," said Sher Horosko, who moved to Westminster 11 years ago. Horosko learned of IMA's work last year before becoming its director of development and communications in January.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 19, 1997
LUBUMBASHI, Zaire -- A day after seizing power, Zaire's new president, Laurent Kabila, remained closeted yesterday in this sun-washed and quiet southern town with his closest advisers, struggling to transform his 7-month-old rebel movement into a transitional government.It is a tall order. Now that rebel troops have taken the capital and former President Mobutu Sese Seko has fled, Kabila has enormous obstacles to overcome in forming a government from his relatively inexperienced group of aides.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and Edmund Sanders,Los Angeles Times | October 29, 2006
KINSHASA, Democratic Republic of the Congo -- Anxious Congolese were to return to the polls this morning to complete the first democratic presidential election in more than 40 years. But fears of renewed violence in this Central African country largely overshadowed the hope and optimism many people expressed during the first round of voting. Thousands began lining up at 50,000 polling stations nationwide early today, just as they did July 30 for the first round, which ended without any of 33 presidential contenders garnering the required 50 percent of ballots.
NEWS
May 30, 1997
LAURENT KABILA's government mocks the constitutional provisions laboriously drafted by the ousted Mobutu regime. By claiming to govern presidentially without a prime minister, and by decree, Mr. Kabila is not only resisting the pretensions of Etienne Tshisekedi. He is proclaiming revolution rather than evolution for the Democratic Republic of Congo, formerly Zaire.The first 13 cabinet ministers kept the key portfolios among his loyal lieutenants. Others went to men associated with the political opposition to Mobutu Sese Seko.
NEWS
August 22, 1998
IN 14 MONTHS as ruler of Democratic Republic of Congo, formerly Zaire, Laurent Kabila has not coped.His victory last year over the tyranny of Mobutu Sese Seko was greeted with joy. But it was easy to doubt he was up to the job.A small-time revolutionary of the 1960s, he was propped up by an invading army of largely Rwandan Tutsis defending the Banyamulenge, their kin in Congo, and pursuing their Hutu enemy. The people wanted anyone but Mobutu.The rebellion against Mr. Kabila, now spreading from eastern Congo toward the capital Kinshasa, appears to come from the Tutsi army that put him in power but also to be picking up Congolese soldiers.
NEWS
May 17, 1997
THE DEATH RATTLE of the 32-year tyranny of Mobutu Sese Seko in Zaire came when Gen. Nzimbi Ngbale donned civilian clothes and hopped a speedboat to sanctuary in neighboring Congo. If a last stand was going to be made, the presidential guard he commanded would have made it. The departure of President Mobutu from Kinshasa and announcement of his giving up power were anticlimax.Taking over an unresisting Kinshasa is a daunting challenge. It is a Third World megalopolis of some five million people, who need water and food and sanitation, reached by few roads, a mighty river and an airport.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 29, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- President Nelson Mandela is emerging as the chief defender of Laurent Kabila, self-proclaimed president of the new Democratic Republic of Congo. But the role has put him at odds with the United States and stirred a storm in his own country.Washington registers alarm over Kabila's ban on all political activity in the former Zaire, which his army took over May 17."The United States hopes this will be a short-term ban," U.S. State Department spokesman John Dinger said yesterday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 2001
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast - A flurry of reports from Congo yesterday said that President Laurent Kabila, who deposed one of Africa's great dictators but then brought his country into even worse disarray, had been shot and killed. The president of the Democratic Republic of Congo was shot by one of his bodyguards, according to John E. Aycoth, a lobbyist and public relations consultant in Washington who acts as Kabila's spokesman in the United States. He said he had talked to top Congolese officials, who told him that the president was dead.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 18, 1997
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- President Nelson Mandela invited Zaire's beleaguered President Mobutu Sese Seko yesterday to meet with rebel leader Laurent Kabila for face-to-face talks here in South Africa.The invitation caps a sustained effort by Mandela's government to play a leading role as continental peacemaker in a civil war that threatens not only the survival of Zaire but Central Africa's stability."We are confident that all parties are committed now to having a summit between the two leaders," Deputy Foreign Minister Aziz Pahad said in a radio interview last night.
NEWS
By EDMUND SANDERS and EDMUND SANDERS,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 21, 2006
NAIROBI, Kenya -- A landmark presidential election in the Democratic Republic of Congo is headed for a runoff this fall between two former rebel leaders seeking to lead Africa's second-largest nation, officials said yesterday. But a violent clash during the evening between militias loyal to the two candidates heightened fears of renewed violence. Joseph Kabila, the transitional president, led the count from the July 30 race with 45 percent of the 16.9 million ballots cast, according to preliminary results announced by the Independent Electoral Commission.
NEWS
July 15, 2003
Nigeria regularly finds itself high up on any list of corrupt nations, helped along by the ever-successful worldwide scheme known as the "419," after the section of the Nigerian criminal code that targets the practice and makes it illegal. Typically, an intended victim receives an e-mail appeal. (The scheme reportedly began in Nigeria in the 1980s with handwritten letters, then evolved to faxed messages and finally e-mails.) The writer pretends to be someone famous, or well-placed or simply rich.
NEWS
January 24, 2002
THIS IS A DISASTER of Old Testament proportions: A lakeside resort city is overrun by Tutsi and Hutu refugees from genocide in a neighboring country; a rebellion ensues; rebels seize control; and a fiery river of lava cleaves the land in two. Food supplies from the United Nations arrived in Goma this week; the international community is helping, as it should. But President Joseph Kabila of the Democratic Republic of the Congo has said he wants aid to bypass the city's rebel commanders.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2001
JANUARY 1 / 1 Veteran Baltimore sports writer John Steadman dies at age 73. 1 / 2 Actor Ray Walston dies at 86. 1 / 3 Federal Reserve policymakers unexpectedly cut key interest rates, the first of 11 rate cuts that take interbank lending rates to 40-year low by year's end. 1 / 9 Linda Chavez withdraws bid to be labor secretary because of controversy over illegal immigrant who lived with her. 1 / 11 Army acknowledges that U.S. soldiers killed "unknown...
NEWS
January 23, 2001
LAURENT KABILA, figurehead of the foreign-backed revolution that overturned the tyranny of Mobutu Sese Seko, solved none of the problems of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Instead, he compounded them by replacing tyranny with more tyranny, civil war with more war and corruption with worse. His assassination by a palace guard solves nothing. With his son Joseph proclaimed successor, his disputes with generals are concluded. Nothing else is changed. The government's writ goes no further inland than before.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 17, 2001
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast - A flurry of reports from Congo yesterday said that President Laurent Kabila, who deposed one of Africa's great dictators but then brought his country into even worse disarray, had been shot and killed. The president of the Democratic Republic of Congo was shot by one of his bodyguards, according to John E. Aycoth, a lobbyist and public relations consultant in Washington who acts as Kabila's spokesman in the United States. He said he had talked to top Congolese officials, who told him that the president was dead.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 15, 1997
KISANGANI, Zaire -- The three guerrillas looked menacing amid the market stalls. Two held shiny assault rifles. Their leader, a huge man with a bushy beard, wore a pistol at his side. Suddenly, they stopped and gruffly ordered Marie Lifaefi to fill a bottle with cooking oil from the vat at her feet.When she finished, the leader slowly reached into his pocket and pulled out money. He smiled, paid for the palm oil, and the rebels wandered on.Behind them, Lifaefi, 40, seemed stunned. "Before, soldiers took everything by force," she explained.
NEWS
April 11, 1997
THE REBELLION has paused for three days to consolidate its gains, which are now half of Zaire, as it prepares the final push to Kinshasa and the sea. Rebel leader Laurent Kabila gave President Mobutu Sese Seku this time to hand over the country. If the reaction of the million people in Lubumbashi is indicative, the country is handing itself to Mr. Kabila, with most people welcoming him as a liberator.So much for the brief negotiation in Pretoria, or talk of a cease-fire, or shared power, or the forlorn U.S. State Department suggestion about transitional arrangements.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 24, 1998
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Leaders of 15 African states yesterday called for an immediate cease-fire in the civil war in Congo to head off the threat of full-scale regional conflict.Congolese President Laurent Kabila's Angolan allies captured a key rebel stronghold in western Congo yesterday. The rebels acknowledged losing the town of Kitona, but said they were continuing their advance on Kinshasa, the capital, and had captured the eastern city of Kisangani.At their summit in South Africa's capital, the African leaders called for a standstill of troops and recognized the government of Kabila, who toppled dictator Mobutu Sese Seko.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 23, 1998
PRETORIA, South Africa -- With outside military intervention increasing in the Democratic Republic of Congo's civil war, President Nelson Mandela launched last-ditch peace negotiations here yesterday.But the absence of two key players -- Congo President Laurent Kabila and his ally President Robert G. Mugabe of Zimbabwe -- undermined the chances of heading off a military showdown.As the rebels, backed by Rwanda and Uganda, claimed to be within 18 miles of the capital, Kinshasa, Angolan troops reportedly crossed the border to aid Kabila by threatening the rebels' western flank.
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