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By Anthony Fair and By Anthony Fair | July 26, 2011
T o say the legacy of Khia “K-Swift” Edgerton lives on is about as big an understatement as you can make in Baltimore.   Three years after her death, the 92Q DJ and radio host's work has motivated a new wave of female artists, popularized a lasting genre of Baltimore club music, draws crowds to memorials and is the inspiration for scholarships and a new school of music and technology.   Hundreds gathered Sunday at Riverside Park Pool in South Baltimore to celebrate 92Q's annual K-Swift Day.  There, attendees said Swift's legacy has spawned an upsurge of female DJs in an industry once dominated by men.  “There weren't a lot of female DJs when Swift started,” says 92Q's Pork Chop, a longtime friend and colleague.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
In July 2008, Angel Carpenter, better known as DJ AngelBaby, fulfilled her lifelong dream of earning an on-air position at 92Q, the city's hip-hop radio station. On one of her first days at the job, Carpenter spotted the source of her inspiration - Khia Edgerton, the beloved and ubiquitous queen of Baltimore Club music known as K-Swift. "There's a window right there, where you could see her on-air," remembered Carpenter, now 28 and a lover of Club music her entire life. "I was so weird and so scared.
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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | July 23, 2008
It's not the kind of music heard at the dentist's office - unless, of course, it's a very hip and hard-core dentist. It's Baltimore club music, and it has made another rare appearance in the mainstream news after the Monday death of one of its most influential promoters, Khia Edgerton, known to her many club and 92Q radio fans as K-Swift. The "Club Queen" brought the so-called B-More sound not only to dance floors and living rooms (literally) in Baltimore, but to clubs throughout the East Coast and beyond.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony Fair and By Anthony Fair | July 26, 2011
T o say the legacy of Khia “K-Swift” Edgerton lives on is about as big an understatement as you can make in Baltimore.   Three years after her death, the 92Q DJ and radio host's work has motivated a new wave of female artists, popularized a lasting genre of Baltimore club music, draws crowds to memorials and is the inspiration for scholarships and a new school of music and technology.   Hundreds gathered Sunday at Riverside Park Pool in South Baltimore to celebrate 92Q's annual K-Swift Day.  There, attendees said Swift's legacy has spawned an upsurge of female DJs in an industry once dominated by men.  “There weren't a lot of female DJs when Swift started,” says 92Q's Pork Chop, a longtime friend and colleague.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | July 23, 2008
It was a day of music and mourning. Yesterday, downtrodden callers and DJs on hip-hop station 92Q shared heartfelt memories of their late colleague Khia Edgerton, better known as K-Swift. Edgerton, 29, died early Monday morning of neck injuries after jumping into an above-ground pool at her home, the state medical examiner's office said yesterday. Dubbed the "Club Queen," Edgerton trumpeted the Baltimore club scene on the air and in dance halls up and down the East Coast. She introduced a younger audience to the fast beats and dirty vocal tracks of Baltimore club music - one of the city's signature sounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ishita Singh | July 10, 2008
T.I. Set to release his new CD Paper Trail this summer, rapper T.I. comes to Baltimore in the latest stop on his "E&R Smoke Tour." "The Boss" Rick Ross, Lil Boosie, Jim Jones, Trina and DJ K-Swift join him at 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. The show is at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow. Tickets are $42-$202. Call 410-347-2020 or go to baltimorearena.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
In July 2008, Angel Carpenter, better known as DJ AngelBaby, fulfilled her lifelong dream of earning an on-air position at 92Q, the city's hip-hop radio station. On one of her first days at the job, Carpenter spotted the source of her inspiration - Khia Edgerton, the beloved and ubiquitous queen of Baltimore Club music known as K-Swift. "There's a window right there, where you could see her on-air," remembered Carpenter, now 28 and a lover of Club music her entire life. "I was so weird and so scared.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | July 22, 2008
Khia Edgerton, a pioneering DJ who as "K-Swift" became one of Baltimore's top radio personalties and a major player in the local music scene, died early yesterday morning after a pool accident at her home. She was 29. Through her popular radio show, which attracted thousands of listeners each night, and frequent live performances, Ms. Edgerton helped reinvigorate and reintroduce the aging genre of Baltimore Club music to a younger generation of listeners. For local artists, a spin on K-Swift's 92Q radio show meant instant recognition.
NEWS
By Alexandra Douglas-Barrera | July 23, 2008
When I heard a live K-Swift set for the first time at age 13, I knew there was no one else on the radio like her. Her mixes, on-air commentary and obvious love for music inspired me and my interest in music and radio. Of course, I had no idea what Baltimore Club music was then - I just knew that whatever she dropped was infectious. I was certainly not alone in my love for K-Swift's radio show. An avid listener throughout high school and into college, I got a show at my school's radio station and, following her example, got into live DJing.
NEWS
March 27, 2006
On March 25, 2006, RAYMOND KENNETH, of Hampstead, MD; beloved husband of Delores V. Swift (nee Bailey); devoted father of Robert K. and Richard K. Swift and Debra J. Hammer; brother of Helen L. Moore, Doris M. Belt, Joyce A. Rudd and the late John E. Swift. Services at Poplar Grove U.M. Church, Poplar Hill Road, Phoenix, MD, Thursday 10 A.M. Interment Poplar Grove Cemetery. Friends may call Tuesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 at the ELINE FUNERAL HOME, 934 S. Main Street, Hampstead, MD 21074.
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | July 23, 2008
It was a day of music and mourning. Yesterday, downtrodden callers and DJs on hip-hop station 92Q shared heartfelt memories of their late colleague Khia Edgerton, better known as K-Swift. Edgerton, 29, died early Monday morning of neck injuries after jumping into an above-ground pool at her home, the state medical examiner's office said yesterday. Dubbed the "Club Queen," Edgerton trumpeted the Baltimore club scene on the air and in dance halls up and down the East Coast. She introduced a younger audience to the fast beats and dirty vocal tracks of Baltimore club music - one of the city's signature sounds.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | July 23, 2008
It's not the kind of music heard at the dentist's office - unless, of course, it's a very hip and hard-core dentist. It's Baltimore club music, and it has made another rare appearance in the mainstream news after the Monday death of one of its most influential promoters, Khia Edgerton, known to her many club and 92Q radio fans as K-Swift. The "Club Queen" brought the so-called B-More sound not only to dance floors and living rooms (literally) in Baltimore, but to clubs throughout the East Coast and beyond.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | July 22, 2008
Khia Edgerton, a pioneering DJ who as "K-Swift" became one of Baltimore's top radio personalties and a major player in the local music scene, died early yesterday morning after a pool accident at her home. She was 29. Through her popular radio show, which attracted thousands of listeners each night, and frequent live performances, Ms. Edgerton helped reinvigorate and reintroduce the aging genre of Baltimore Club music to a younger generation of listeners. For local artists, a spin on K-Swift's 92Q radio show meant instant recognition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ishita Singh | July 10, 2008
T.I. Set to release his new CD Paper Trail this summer, rapper T.I. comes to Baltimore in the latest stop on his "E&R Smoke Tour." "The Boss" Rick Ross, Lil Boosie, Jim Jones, Trina and DJ K-Swift join him at 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. The show is at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow. Tickets are $42-$202. Call 410-347-2020 or go to baltimorearena.com.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | July 30, 2008
When radio personality Bob Lopez died in May 2005, after 27 years on 98 Rock, his bosses knew finding someone to fill his shoes wouldn't be easy. "We had lost a guy who had been on the air almost since the birth of the radio station," said Dave Hill, at the time three years into his tenure as program director at WIYY-FM (97.9). "After Lopez died, by just playing music and highlights of Lopez's career, it gave the audience time to reflect. It also gave us the chance to step back for a second.
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