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K Street

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NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - HBO's new pseudo-reality series K Street offers an amusing and entertaining peek inside the world of Washington power. But its view inside the curtain that shrouds the real K Street is about as close to reality as M*A*S*H was to a real war zone. As a journalist who works in and around the real K Street - a stark boulevard that is to the world of power-brokering and influence-peddling what Wall Street is to high finance - I'm delighted to see Hollywood take it seriously enough to make a series about it. But after watching the first episode Sunday, I wonder whether co-producers Steven Soderbergh, the Oscar-winning director of Traffic, and actor George Clooney will be serious enough to show the deal-making, back-scratching, log-rolling and brow-beating that goes on in K Street's real world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley is supposed to be Maryland's political TV star. Just ask him. But it was Congressman Andy Harris who drew the bigger national audience in his appearance on CNN's "Crossfire. " When O'Malley "debated" Texas Gov. Rick Perry Sept. 18 on "Crossfire," 329,000 viewers tuned in. When Harris appeared Monday on the CNN show with Anne Filipic, president of Enroll America, an organization trying to enroll people in Obamacare, the telecast drew 450,000 viewers. Before Harris starts thinking he's the most telegenic conservative since Ronald Reagan, or O'Malley sinks into a depression over the feared loss of his TV mojo, there's a major factor contributing to those audiences: the news flow of the day. Monday was a good night for cable news because of President Barack Obama's late afternoon appearance to talk about the deeply flawed rollout of the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a Obamacare)
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NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND | April 23, 2005
IT'S A GORGEOUS spring afternoon at Farragut Square, and the old admiral who damned the torpedoes at Mobile Bay is heroically keeping watch on the lobbyists and climbers and special pleaders and experts on arcane topics and button-holers and elbow-grabbers and gofers of all descriptions who have arrived from the four corners of the continent and now pour back and forth along the avenues of influence in the nation's capital. Back in the Civil War days, David Farragut wasn't shy about sailing into enemy territory - especially because it used to be and by rights should still have been our territory - and so what better location could there be for the little shop that still beckons to Washingtonian passers-by with the black and orange banner and familiar bird of Baltimore?
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Yesterday I invited you to come up with a term , a label for the kind of reasonable or informed or empirical prescriptivist that I profess to be. That Bill Walsh and Jan Freeman and others demonstrably are. Here are most of your responses, culled from the comments, Facebook, Twitter, and private messages. Dr. Whom  Much as I might like to see myself doing battle with peever Daleks, this is an individual title, not a generic one. Same with Mayor of Wordville .   Fixer Tends to place me among the K Street crowd in Washington.
NEWS
By PETER H. STONE | July 30, 1995
Since early in the year, an elite group of K Street lobbyists with strong Republican pedigrees has been huddling every few weeks with Rep. John A. Boehner, Republican of Ohio, to discuss the House Republican leadership's performance and its strategies for implementing its "Contract with America."Many of those in the group were formerly lobbyists for the White House or top aides to Republican congressional leaders. In the Bush administration, for instance, Washington lobbyists Nicholas E. Calio and Gary J. Andres ran the White House's liaison operations with the House, doing much of their work out of the offices of then-Minority Whip Newt Gingrich, Republican of Georgia.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | May 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Under a bridge off K Street, not far from one of Washington's busier business districts, two Metropolitan Police officers rouse a homeless man sleeping in a plywood shelter."
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
Yesterday I invited you to come up with a term , a label for the kind of reasonable or informed or empirical prescriptivist that I profess to be. That Bill Walsh and Jan Freeman and others demonstrably are. Here are most of your responses, culled from the comments, Facebook, Twitter, and private messages. Dr. Whom  Much as I might like to see myself doing battle with peever Daleks, this is an individual title, not a generic one. Same with Mayor of Wordville .   Fixer Tends to place me among the K Street crowd in Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley is supposed to be Maryland's political TV star. Just ask him. But it was Congressman Andy Harris who drew the bigger national audience in his appearance on CNN's "Crossfire. " When O'Malley "debated" Texas Gov. Rick Perry Sept. 18 on "Crossfire," 329,000 viewers tuned in. When Harris appeared Monday on the CNN show with Anne Filipic, president of Enroll America, an organization trying to enroll people in Obamacare, the telecast drew 450,000 viewers. Before Harris starts thinking he's the most telegenic conservative since Ronald Reagan, or O'Malley sinks into a depression over the feared loss of his TV mojo, there's a major factor contributing to those audiences: the news flow of the day. Monday was a good night for cable news because of President Barack Obama's late afternoon appearance to talk about the deeply flawed rollout of the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a Obamacare)
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 25, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Along K Street, Washington's busiest downtown thoroughfare, very bright red signs have started showing up on utility poles and boxes, and pasted over other posters on available flat spaces. Scurrying pedestrians andmotorists can't miss the glaring top line: "Stop Souter."But, if all of the political realists in this city could be polled on whether that will happen, it is fair to speculate that they could be close to unanimous in saying it would not.It is now common wisdom, shared along K Street as well as elsewhere in town, that Judge David H. Souter's move to the U.S. Supreme Court almost certainly will not be stopped.
NEWS
By KAREN HOSLER | November 26, 2005
Thousands of young people head to Capitol Hill each year hoping to launch their careers, and when Michael Scanlon arrived in the mid-1990s, he was fairly typical: talented, ambitious, not particularly ideological but drawn to power. But Mr. Scanlon, now 35, apparently was missing something: a moral compass that might have helped him better navigate an environment that fostered personal corruption. This boyishly handsome and charming flim-flam man from Kensington, Md., is now at the center of an epic scandal - complete with mobsters, murder, defrauded millions, and women scorned.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2011
For the Jack Abramoff biopic, "Casino Jack," how difficult was it for John David Whalen to get into the heart and head of K Street lobbyist Kevin Ring? The Baltimore-born actor explained Wednesday that it wasn't all that hard. In an ensemble filled with master manipulators and scam artists from Kevin Spacey's Abramoff on down, "Kevin Ring's the innocent, the ingenue, the guy who goes along — he is not headstrong, not greedy, not a mover or shaker. " Director George Hickenlooper included this junior member of Abramoff's team in his cast of tainted characters only after he and screenwriter Norman Snider interviewed Ring about the Abramoff fraud and corruption scandal.
NEWS
By KAREN HOSLER | November 26, 2005
Thousands of young people head to Capitol Hill each year hoping to launch their careers, and when Michael Scanlon arrived in the mid-1990s, he was fairly typical: talented, ambitious, not particularly ideological but drawn to power. But Mr. Scanlon, now 35, apparently was missing something: a moral compass that might have helped him better navigate an environment that fostered personal corruption. This boyishly handsome and charming flim-flam man from Kensington, Md., is now at the center of an epic scandal - complete with mobsters, murder, defrauded millions, and women scorned.
NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND | April 23, 2005
IT'S A GORGEOUS spring afternoon at Farragut Square, and the old admiral who damned the torpedoes at Mobile Bay is heroically keeping watch on the lobbyists and climbers and special pleaders and experts on arcane topics and button-holers and elbow-grabbers and gofers of all descriptions who have arrived from the four corners of the continent and now pour back and forth along the avenues of influence in the nation's capital. Back in the Civil War days, David Farragut wasn't shy about sailing into enemy territory - especially because it used to be and by rights should still have been our territory - and so what better location could there be for the little shop that still beckons to Washingtonian passers-by with the black and orange banner and familiar bird of Baltimore?
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 4, 2005
WASHINGTON - Rep. Billy Tauzin and Sen. John B. Breaux commiserated on the telephone recently, two Louisiana politicians considering what their lives would be like now that they won't be part of the new Congress convening today on Capitol Hill. The question wasn't where they'd live or what hobby they'd take up after retiring from their powerful posts. It was which multimillion-dollar offers from law firms, lobbying shops or trade groups they would accept. "It's been kind of exciting and at the same time kind of a little traumatic," Tauzin said in an interview on the day last month that he was announced as the new head of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA)
TRAVEL
By Kathy McCabe and Kathy McCabe,Special to the Sun | November 16, 2003
The future of Iraq, Arnold's California win, who will get the Democratic nomination in 2004 -- all are topics of conversation in the nation's capital right now. But what Washington is really talking about these days is HBO's K Street, the weekly television series featuring real Washington power players (mixing it up with actors) and the places where they get deals done. If you haven't seen the show, tonight is your chance to catch the season finale (at 9 p.m.; HBO says it expects to air reruns)
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - HBO's new pseudo-reality series K Street offers an amusing and entertaining peek inside the world of Washington power. But its view inside the curtain that shrouds the real K Street is about as close to reality as M*A*S*H was to a real war zone. As a journalist who works in and around the real K Street - a stark boulevard that is to the world of power-brokering and influence-peddling what Wall Street is to high finance - I'm delighted to see Hollywood take it seriously enough to make a series about it. But after watching the first episode Sunday, I wonder whether co-producers Steven Soderbergh, the Oscar-winning director of Traffic, and actor George Clooney will be serious enough to show the deal-making, back-scratching, log-rolling and brow-beating that goes on in K Street's real world.
NEWS
By Larry Luxner | February 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- If you want to see the trappings of diplomacy, take a drive along tree-lined Massachusetts Avenue, where the colorful flags of more than a hundred embassies flutter from the tops of stately mansions.But the real grunt work is done on K Street, where sleek steel-and-glass buildings house many of the capital's 17,500 or so lobbyists -- the hired guns who, for a fee, try to sway the White House, Congress and a bewildering array of federal agencies on behalf of their various clients.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2011
For the Jack Abramoff biopic, "Casino Jack," how difficult was it for John David Whalen to get into the heart and head of K Street lobbyist Kevin Ring? The Baltimore-born actor explained Wednesday that it wasn't all that hard. In an ensemble filled with master manipulators and scam artists from Kevin Spacey's Abramoff on down, "Kevin Ring's the innocent, the ingenue, the guy who goes along — he is not headstrong, not greedy, not a mover or shaker. " Director George Hickenlooper included this junior member of Abramoff's team in his cast of tainted characters only after he and screenwriter Norman Snider interviewed Ring about the Abramoff fraud and corruption scandal.
NEWS
By Larry Luxner | February 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- If you want to see the trappings of diplomacy, take a drive along tree-lined Massachusetts Avenue, where the colorful flags of more than a hundred embassies flutter from the tops of stately mansions.But the real grunt work is done on K Street, where sleek steel-and-glass buildings house many of the capital's 17,500 or so lobbyists -- the hired guns who, for a fee, try to sway the White House, Congress and a bewildering array of federal agencies on behalf of their various clients.
NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | May 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Under a bridge off K Street, not far from one of Washington's busier business districts, two Metropolitan Police officers rouse a homeless man sleeping in a plywood shelter."
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