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By Annie Linskey and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 18, 2010
(From the Maryland Politics blog) Maryland's embattled Juvenile Services secretary is stepping down to pursue "an opportunity in a different state," the agency announced this afternoon. The secretary, Donald W. DeVore, is the first cabinet-level departure since Gov. Martin O'Malley won a second term. DeVore's last year has rocked by the murder of a teacher, apparently at the hands of a student, at the Cheltenham Youth Facility in Prince George's County. State auditors also recently turned up chronic problems with the agency's procurement and bureaucratic procedures.
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NEWS
By Ivan Leshinsky | October 1, 2014
The number of young people arrested and brought to the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services (DJS) is down drastically over the past 10 years. Fewer juveniles are being placed in secure detention facilities, and plans for construction of a new juvenile jail in Baltimore City have been shelved, at least temporarily. Some contend that the reduction in the numbers of youth charged and detained is more about revised policing policies than anything else. We've seen the end of zero tolerance, and "youth connection centers" (YCCs)
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NEWS
August 24, 2010
The report from Maryland Occupational Safety and Health (MOSH), this state's workplace safety enforcement agency, cites the Department of Juvenile Services for five serious safety violations in the aftermath of Ms. Hannah Wheeling's murder at the hand of one of her students ("Employees broke safety protocol the day teacher was killed," Aug. 21). Yet the recommendations to DJS might as well be stamped "Keep Up Business as Usual". The MOSH report cites the Department of Juvenile Services' existing safety protocols as sufficient to prevent future homicides of staff by residents when they are followed.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
A 21-year-old Baltimore man — convicted less than five years ago of murder — has been charged in a double shooting last week that left 19-year-old Dominic Tales dead and another man critically injured, police said. Police said two officers were on patrol at 1 a.m. Thursday when they heard shots nearby and one of them saw Marquel Gaffney firing a handgun in the 900 block of N. Monroe St. in West Baltimore. In charging documents, police say the officer recognized Gaffney, of the 2100 block of Ashton St., from "numerous" prior contacts.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
Juvenile Services Secretary Donald W. DeVore announced Thursday that he's looking for jobs in other states and will not seek reappointment, making him the first Cabinet-level departure since Gov. Martin O'Malley won a second term. DeVore's four-year tenure atop the agency has earned mixed reviews from advocates and lawmakers; they applaud his efforts to physically revamp the state facilities but are frustrated that the agency has not beefed up its treatment and rehabilitation programs.
NEWS
May 14, 2006
Not even six months into her tenure as Maryland's independent monitor for juvenile services and Katherine A. Perez has shown that she takes her job quite seriously. In one week, she released a quarterly update of Department of Juvenile Services facilities and two special reports based on surprise visits to two centers. All three reports reinforce the dismally familiar picture of an agency that's not fully in control of its mission or of the young people in its care. DJS Secretary Kenneth C. Montague Jr.'s suggestion that the release of the reports was somehow politically motivated is a regrettable and inappropriate diversion.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | January 8, 1991
Linda D'Amario Rossi, whose blunt, no-nonsense style as secretary of juvenile services has won her fans and critics in her 3 1/2 -year tenure here, said today she has been offered a job package in Rhode Island that Maryland simply cannot match.Rhode Island Gov. Bruce Sundlun was to announce today that he has offered Rossi the directorship of the state Department for Children and Families, a job to which Rossi was appointed in 1984, then promptly lost in 1985 when a new governor, Edward D. DiPrete, was elected.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 1, 2009
Nicola Denise Paylor, a case manager specialist with the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services, died of congestive heart failure Friday at Northwest Hospital Center. The Randallstown resident was 38. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Woodlawn area, she attended St. Cecilia Parochial School and John Paul Regional Catholic School. She was a 1988 graduate of Archbishop Keough High School. She earned a Bachelor of Science and a master's degree in criminal justice at Coppin State University.
NEWS
February 25, 2003
William H. Brooks, a retired juvenile services supervisor, died of complications from cancer Feb. 18 at Northwest Hospital Center. The Randallstown resident was 67. Mr. Brooks retired in 1996 as a supervisor in the Department of Juvenile Services in Baltimore. He began his career in 1964 as a parole and probation officer, and later took a temporary assignment to head a state program to increase minority participation in the real estate industry, family members said. Born in Baltimore and raised on West Lexington Street, he was a 1955 graduate of Douglass High School and earned a business administration degree from what is now Morgan State University.
NEWS
November 21, 2010
The departure of Donald DeVore marks the end of yet another secretary who has failed to turn around Maryland's most troubled agency, the Department of Juvenile Services. Mr. DeVore announced Thursday that he would not seek reappointment and was considering career opportunities outside the state. His withdrawal perhaps just saves Gov. Martin O'Malley from having to fire him so that the department, which has been plagued by persistent organizational and security problems, can finally begin to move ahead.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
As The Baltimore Sun investigated years of financial and regulatory problems surrounding LifeLine, a Maryland company that operated group homes for disabled adults and children, requests for comment went out to the five people listed as members of its board of directors. That produced some unusual responses. Banker Anthony T. Carpenter was listed as heading the board, according to LifeLine's December relicensing application, which The Sun obtained through a Public Information Act request.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
A 29-year-old Department of Juvenile Services employee and her 39-year-old boyfriend have been arrested after shots were fired Thursday night in the parking lot of a youth detention facility in Baltimore County, state police said. Police said an employee reported that he was leaving the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School in the 9700 block of Old Harford Road about 10:30 p.m. when several shots were fired and a car sped off. Troopers learned that the vehicle belonged to Hickey School employee Mia C. Henson and was being driven by her boyfriend, Jermaine A. Conway.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
While gun violence drove Baltimore's homicide numbers up last year, the number of children shot and killed in the city dropped to the lowest level in at least a decade. Three children under 18 were shot and killed in 2013, down from five the year before, to continue a five-year decline. From 2006 to 2008, the death count reached 20 or more each year. Twenty-three youths were shot and wounded in 2013, down from a recent high of 89 in 2008. Total youth killings - including those not involving guns - also fell slightly, from 11 to 10. Advocates for youth called those declines an encouraging sign in a year in which the city's streets turned more deadly.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
Youth advocates are questioning whether the Department of Juvenile Services needs to build a new 48-bed detention facility in Carroll County for girls awaiting assignment to one of the state's juvenile treatment centers. At a time when the state should be trying to reduce the number of youths incarcerated in Maryland, they ask, why is it adding to capacity instead? That's a valid point, but the arguments against a new building are still outweighed by the need to replace the state's dilapidated current facility for girls, which is clearly at the end of its useful life and should be closed.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
Baltimore's Summer Curfew Center reopened Friday for the sixth season in an attempt to keep youths off the streets overnight, hold parents accountable and connect families to services, the mayor's office said. The center, at 200 East North Ave., will be open Fridays and Saturdays from 11:30 p.m. to 4 a.m. through Aug. 25. Youths on the street after the city's weekend curfew of midnight may be brought to the center by police. Parents or guardians are contacted to come for their children.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
Veronica Alford had been friends with Edith Turnage for 20 years. After Turnage's daughter died in an accidental shooting at the hands of her friend's son, Alford sent flowers, balloons and a teddy bear. She asked about the funeral but never heard back. Turnage could not fathom the charges that would be leveled against her friend. How could Alford have helped drag 13-year-old Monae Turnage's body down an alley and bury it in pile of trash? How could she have arranged to hide the gun that killed the girl?
NEWS
October 27, 1998
Carroll County Juvenile Services received a $32,800 state grant to hire an addictions counselor to monitor 30 to 40 heroin-involved youths, officials said yesterday.The counselor will ensure that juvenile offenders receive intense daily supervision, participate in treatment, submit to drug tests, and receive immediate consequences for violating probation.The counselor will work closely with police and other agencies cooperating in the state's Heroin Action Plan, a program that includes monitoring drug trends, prevention, early intervention, education and ensuring safer schools.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
You empty your pockets of change, keys and pens, walk slowly through a metal detector and raise your arms above your head for a top-to-bottom frisking. A grim-looking security guard unlocks a metal door, then two more, closing each behind you with a "thump" as he leads you further into the detention center. Then a final door swings open. "Welcome," exclaims an affable young woman, gesturing toward a table laden with food and surrounded by fresh-faced teen-aged boys. "Won't you sit down and join us?"
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
The Maryland Department of Juvenile Services has asked again to expand the capacity of a privately run residential facility in Carroll County to twice the state's limit, saying there is a backlog of young offenders who are waiting in detention centers instead of getting treatment. The department first broached doubling the capacity of Silver Oak Academy from 48 to 96 beds more than a year ago. It was a departure from the state's long-term plan to create smaller treatment centers for young offenders.
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