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HEALTH
By Andea K. Walker | February 28, 2013
Legislation pending in the General Assembly challenges new regulations to go into affect this summer that would ban decorative bumpers that line the inside of baby cribs. The bill introduced by Sen. John C. Astle, an Anne Arundel County Democrat, w ould allow crib bumpers that meet standards set up by The American Society for Testing and Materials. The state ban takes affect June 21 and prohibits the sale of pads made of nonmesh material that rest on the crib mattress and run the circumference of the crib . It does not apply to mesh bumpers or those that wrap around crib rails.
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HEALTH
By Andea K. Walker | February 28, 2013
Legislation pending in the General Assembly challenges new regulations to go into affect this summer that would ban decorative bumpers that line the inside of baby cribs. The bill introduced by Sen. John C. Astle, an Anne Arundel County Democrat, w ould allow crib bumpers that meet standards set up by The American Society for Testing and Materials. The state ban takes affect June 21 and prohibits the sale of pads made of nonmesh material that rest on the crib mattress and run the circumference of the crib . It does not apply to mesh bumpers or those that wrap around crib rails.
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NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Maryland could become the first state in the nation to ban the sale of bumper pads that line the inside of cribs after a state panel recommended Friday that health officials declare them a hazard because they can suffocate or strangle babies. The recommendations made by the four-member task force of mostly pediatricians will now go to Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, who will decide whether to write them into regulation. The recommendations would not prevent parents from using the crib bumpers — which have been attributed to at least two dozen infant deaths nationwide — or buying them in other states.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
Maryland health officials proposed Tuesday a ban on the sale of crib bumpers, which have been linked to the asphyxiation of at least two dozen infants across the country — a move that would make it the first state to prohibit the bumpers. The pads have little safety benefit and pose a small, but potentially deadly risk, according to members of a state task force formed this year to advise state health officials. "Crib bumpers are not part of the safe sleep ABCs — babies should sleep alone, on their backs in a crib," Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said at a news conference announcing the proposal.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
Maryland health officials proposed Tuesday a ban on the sale of crib bumpers, which have been linked to the asphyxiation of at least two dozen infants across the country — a move that would make it the first state to prohibit the bumpers. The pads have little safety benefit and pose a small, but potentially deadly risk, according to members of a state task force formed this year to advise state health officials. "Crib bumpers are not part of the safe sleep ABCs — babies should sleep alone, on their backs in a crib," Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said at a news conference announcing the proposal.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
The state will consider adopting voluntary safety standards rather than an all-out ban on bumper pads that line the inside of cribs and have been determined a hazard to babies. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has been pushing regulations that would make it the first state to ban the sale of bumper pads, but said Friday it will hold hearings to look at voluntary safety standards adopted by the manufacturers. Studies have found that the bumper pads, often included as part of bedding sets, can suffocate or strangle babies.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
Maryland health officials have published final regulations to prohibit the sale of decorative bumpers that line the inside of baby cribs, making this the first state with such a ban. The regulations issued by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene go into effect June 21. The ban comes amid heightened concern about bumpers, which have been found to suffocate and strangle babies. Older babies can use the bumpers to climb out of the crib and fall, studies have also found.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - The federal government issued its first ratings of car seats for children yesterday and called for improvements in a life-saving product that many parents have trouble installing correctly. Only three models earned straight A's in the five categories rated by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for convenience and ease of use. Two were Graco Comfort Sport models and a third was an Evenflo Tribute. "Our expectation is that all child-seat manufacturers will make A-rated seats before too long," said Jeffrey W. Runge, head of the agency.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | November 5, 1991
Cribs once considered safe may be dangerousOLDER CRIBS that once passed government safety standards may now be considered dangerous, according to the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association, which has been testing and certifying baby products since 1975. Of particular concern are older cribs that have corner posts extending two to four inches high. A baby can catch its clothing on the posts and be strangled, says the association. The Consumer Product Safety Commission concurs.To ensure a child's safety, the association recommends that parents:* Make sure the corner posts are no more than one-sixteenth of an inch high.
NEWS
By Ovetta Sampson and Ovetta Sampson,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 9, 2000
Today's busy kids are loaded up with dance classes, karate lessons, soccer games, scouts. They play computer games and Nintendo, plug in their CD players, and operate the VCR like a pro. Sounds like a charmed existence, but some experts worry. They fear these children don't get enough time or encouragement to play. Really play. Gameboy and Pokemon don't count. These experts are talking about good old-fashioned, doll house, make-believe clubhouse play. By not engaging in such "creative play," experts say children are missing out on getting much-needed survival skills.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Maryland could become the first state in the nation to ban the sale of bumper pads that line the inside of cribs after a state panel recommended Friday that health officials declare them a hazard because they can suffocate or strangle babies. The recommendations made by the four-member task force of mostly pediatricians will now go to Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, who will decide whether to write them into regulation. The recommendations would not prevent parents from using the crib bumpers — which have been attributed to at least two dozen infant deaths nationwide — or buying them in other states.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
No one can expect to escape childhood without a few bumps and scrapes. But federal regulators, manufacturers and parents are still grappling with ensuring the safety of products for babies and toddlers. Several widespread product recalls this year have stoked the debate — and made navigating the consumer market potentially heart-wrenching. At least half of more than 500 recalls by the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission each year are for children's products, said Don Mays, senior director of product safety for Consumer Reports.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | November 10, 1994
Each year, about 23,000 children ages 15 months and younger receive hospital emergency-room treatment for injuries caused by falls while secured in one of the most popular baby items available -- infant baby walkers. According to the Consumer Products Safety Commission, walkers account for more injuries than any other juvenile product on the market.Of those injuries, about 80 percent occurred when the walker and baby careened down a set of stairs; in many cases, that happened even when a gate was in place.
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