Advertisement
HomeCollectionsJuvenile Offenders
IN THE NEWS

Juvenile Offenders

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 1, 2012
Here is a simple solution to the "problem" of juvenile offenders ("For many juvenile offenders, parole is out of reach," July 22): If you don't want to do the time, then don't do the crime! Paul Glascock, Ellicott City
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 11, 2014
For far too many young people who get caught up in the criminal justice system, an arrest or conviction for even a minor, non-violent offense can become a one-way ticket to a shrunken future that slams the door on opportunities for the rest of their lives. Being arrested as a teen increases a person's chances of being arrested again as an adult, and teenagers sentenced to jail are more likely to be incarcerated later in life as well. Add to that the nation's harsh drug laws and stiff mandatory minimum sentencing policies and it's no wonder America locks up more of its citizens than any other country in the world.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
A program that aims to keep juvenile offenders in treatment and out of jail in Anne Arundel County that was threatened with cancellation because of state budget cuts will continue for the next year and expand to Baltimore City with federal stimulus funds. The Juvenile Intervention & Family Independence Project, or JIFI, was told in October that state funding for the 10-year-old program would cease at the end of 2009 because of budget constraints, said Ivan Leshinsky, executive director of the Baltimore-based Chesapeake Center for Youth Development, which administers JIFI and also runs an alternative school and an after-school program.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Mark D. Metzger, who was director of youth initiatives for the Baltimore County Police Department for more than 30 years and was recognized for his work with juvenile delinquents and their families, died April 9 of lung cancer at his Stoney Beach home in Anne Arundel County. He was 65. "Dr. Metzger served the citizens of Baltimore County for over 32 years. He was a dedicated and outstanding leader who impacted the quality of life for many families," Baltimore County Police Chief James W. Johnson said in a statement.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 17, 2010
A youngster is found delinquent - juvenile justice system parlance for guilty - for spray painting gang symbols on a wall. A police officer tells the principal that the youth could be headed for more trouble and warrants close watching. Seems like the prudent thing to do. But in Maryland, that exchange is against the law, a violation of secrecy rules governing juvenile proceedings in criminal courts. A top lawmaker in Annapolis, outraged that parents in Anne Arundel County didn't know gangs were active in their schools until a 14-year-old boy was killed last year in Crofton, is trying to undo those restrictions, hoping to create a better system of communications to combat gang activity.
NEWS
August 10, 2012
There appears to be a disconnect with the state's analysis of how to address the very serious issue of how to adequately and appropriately deal with the placement of young people charged with adult crimes under the state's supervision. Corrections secretary Gary Maynard in his August 6th letter to your paper ("Corrections chief: Youth are kept safe in adult jail") acknowledged that, "these juveniles are in an adult facility because they have been charged as adults with violent felony or other serious crime and are under the jurisdiction of the adult court.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2010
First-time juvenile offenders in Annapolis will be offered an alternative to a juvenile record with the start of a new program offered by police. The Juvenile Offenders in Need of Supervision Program, or JOINS, will give first-time offenders under the age of 18, who admit to minor crimes and agree to enter into the 90-day program, a chance to expunge their record, if the victim agrees. "It's for those kids that you can work with and give the right attention to. They need to be given a second chance," said Det. Shelley White, director of the program.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2005
The Ehrlich administration's plan to send some Maryland juvenile offenders to programs as far away as Texas, Minnesota and Iowa drew sharp criticism yesterday from Baltimore's top juvenile judge, the Maryland Public Defender's Office and key state legislators. "I'm absolutely appalled by it," Baltimore Circuit Judge Martin P. Welch said of the plan released this week. He said judges need to be familiar with the places where juveniles are being sent so they know if they are appropriate for disadvantaged, urban youths.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
First-time juvenile offenders in Howard County and their victims will meet face-to-face in a few months, and inmates at the Howard County Detention Center will be learning how to prepare for job interviews and balance checkbooks -- thanks to state grants announced yesterday."
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1998
It's a hot, sticky Wednesday afternoon in Baltimore County, and Courtroom No. 3 in Wilkens is quiet except for the muffled hum of a vacuum cleaner next door. Officer Sherell Queen leans across a glossy oak table usually occupied by prosecutors, an arrest report dangling from her fingers."The incident you were charged with was a narcotics violation," she says. "I know what the police report says, but I want you to tell me."The 14-year-old boy in a purple shirt stares at the table and mumbles a few words, then wilts under Queen's stony gaze.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
The state Board of Public Works voted Wednesday to allow a Carroll County treatment center for juveniles to double its size to 96 beds — twice the state cap of 48 — despite a policy of sending troubled teens to smaller facilities for treatment. "It's not ideal," Gov. Martin O'Malley, a member of the board, said after voting for the expansion. "It's not ideal at all. " But O'Malley and Sam Abed, Maryland's secretary of juvenile services, said the state had no choice but to allow the privately run Silver Oak facility to expand because more than 40 youths are languishing in state detention centers instead of getting court-mandated treatment.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Lawyers for a Harford County teen accused of killing his father last year attempted to convince a judge Friday that it would be unconstitutional to try the 17-year-old as an adult. Robert C. Richardson III's attorneys also said the boy is suffering from the effects of isolation at the county jail, asking at a motions hearing for their client to be transferred to a facility for juveniles. They said he is being held in solitary confinement at the Harford County Detention Center. "The jail in Harford County does not have the capability to address the needs of juvenile offenders and juvenile inmates," lawyer Kay Beehler said at a hearing Friday in Harford County Circuit Court.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
In school, and in court, showing up is half the battle. So when statistics revealed that 60 percent of juveniles charged in Baltimore County were missing their court dates, officials decided they needed something to help make sure the youngsters showed up. The result was the Notification Caller Project, an effort in which a court staffer simply calls juveniles several days before their court dates to remind them — and their parents — of the...
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2012
Activists fighting a state plan to build a new $70 million juvenile detention facility in Baltimore received some high-profile backing Thursday night, as the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson joined their cause. "We must revive the war on poverty tonight, not the war on the poor," the prominent civil rights activist and Baptist minister said before a crowd of more than 200 people who gathered in Baltimore's War Memorial Building to rally against the state plan. Jackson said that with thousands of vacant homes degrading neighborhoods and unemployment leaving families unstable, Gov. Martin O'Malley could better serve the city and its youth by reallocating the jail funding to jobs programs, community initiatives and neighborhood redevelopment.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Dozens of Baltimore teens and young adults packed a state Senate hearing Wednesday, urging lawmakers not to build a new Baltimore jail for juvenile offenders charged as adults and instead shift efforts to keeping youths from being locked up in the first place. The comments came as the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee met to take testimony on the $70 million, 120-bed proposal being pushed by the state as a way to improve conditions for youthful prisoners in the city. Opponents, such as 21-year-old activist Nicole Cheatom, told senators that the state should repurpose a women's prerelease unit closed three years ago instead of building a new facility.
NEWS
August 15, 2012
Regarding your recent editorial on holding juvenile offenders in adult detention centers, here are some specific recommendations that might assist in salvaging the lives of some of these misguided youth ("A broken system", Aug. 7). •Discipline and respect could be inculcated by engaging a local military reserve unit for drilling exercises, and eventually organizing the youth into military like groups to perform these exercises themselves. •Community involvement to develop a positive attitude among residents could be strengthened by having juveniles choose to donate half their lunch or dinner each week to a local organization that serves the needy.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1995
Instead of sending juvenile delinquents away to be reformed, a new state program in Severn seeks to help them at home.The Pioneer City Project puts counselors in the community to help rebuild families and get their teen-agers off drugs and the street. It is the state's first attempt at an intensive, community-based juvenile reform program."The concept is not new. Just try to be there to help the kid and to help the kid help himself," said Laurens Carner, the project director who works for the state Department of Juvenile Services.
NEWS
August 10, 2012
There appears to be a disconnect with the state's analysis of how to address the very serious issue of how to adequately and appropriately deal with the placement of young people charged with adult crimes under the state's supervision. Corrections secretary Gary Maynard in his August 6th letter to your paper ("Corrections chief: Youth are kept safe in adult jail") acknowledged that, "these juveniles are in an adult facility because they have been charged as adults with violent felony or other serious crime and are under the jurisdiction of the adult court.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
Regarding your recent article about living conditions for juvenile offenders at the Baltimore City Detention Center, these young people were charged as adults because they robbed, raped, murdered or shot someone ("'Nobody belongs in those conditions,'" July 29). Are we supposed to feel sorry for them because they have no air conditioning? Not that long ago these same juveniles were hanging out on the streets in hot and humid weather terrorizing their neighborhoods, but now they can't stand the heat?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.